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I have a minor problem in one of my apps. It uses a BroadCastReceiver to detect when a call finishes and then performs some minor housekeeping tasks. These have to be delayed for a few seconds, to allow the user to see some data and to ensure that the call log has been updated. I'm currently using handler.postDelayed() for this purpose:

public class CallEndReceiver extends BroadcastReceiver {

@Override
public void onReceive(final Context context, final Intent intent) {
    if (DebugFlags.LOG_OUTGOING)
        Log.v("CallState changed "
                + intent.getStringExtra(TelephonyManager.EXTRA_STATE));
    if (intent.getStringExtra(TelephonyManager.EXTRA_STATE)
            .equalsIgnoreCase(TelephonyManager.EXTRA_STATE_IDLE)) {
        SharedPreferences prefs = Utils.getPreferences(context);
        if (prefs.getBoolean("auto_cancel_notification", true)) {
            if (DebugFlags.LOG_OUTGOING)
                Log.v("Posting Handler to remove Notification ");
            final Handler mHandler = new Handler();
             final Runnable mCancelNotification = new Runnable() {
                   public void run() {
                        NotificationManager notificationMgr = (NotificationManager) context
                        .getSystemService(Service.NOTIFICATION_SERVICE);
                notificationMgr.cancel(12443);
                if (DebugFlags.LOG_OUTGOING)
                    Log.v("Removing Notification ");
                   }
                };
                mHandler.postDelayed(mCancelNotification, 4000);


        }
        final Handler updateHandler = new Handler();
         final Runnable mUpdate = new Runnable() {
               public void run() {
        if (DebugFlags.LOG_OUTGOING)
            Log.v("Starting updateService");
        Intent newBackgroundService = new Intent(context,
                CallLogUpdateService.class);
        context.startService(newBackgroundService);
               }
               };
               updateHandler.postDelayed(mUpdate, 5000);

        if (DebugFlags.TRACE_OUTGOING)
            Debug.stopMethodTracing();
        try
        {
        // Stopping old Service
        Intent backgroundService = new Intent(context,
                NetworkCheckService.class);
        context.stopService(backgroundService);
        context.unregisterReceiver(this);
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            Log.e("Fehler beim Entfernen des Receivers", e);
        }
    }

}

}

Now I have the problem, that this setup works about 90% of the time. In about 10% of cases, the notification isn't removed. I suspect, that the thread dies before the message queue processes the message/runnable.

I'm now thinking about alternatives to postDelayed() and one of my choices is obviously the AlarmManager. However, I'm not sure about the performance impact (or the resources it uses).

Maybe there is a better way to ensure that all messages have been processed before a thread dies or another way to delay the execution of those two bits of code.

Thank you

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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'm currently using handler.postDelayed() for this purpose:

That's not a good idea, assuming the BroadcastReceiver is being triggered by a filter in the manifest.

Now I have the problem, that this setup works about 90% of the time. In about 10% of cases, the notification isn't removed. I suspect, that the thread dies before the message queue processes the message/runnable.

More accurately, the process is terminated, taking everything with it.

I'm now thinking about alternatives to postDelayed() and one of my choices is obviously the AlarmManager. However, I'm not sure about the performance impact (or the resources it uses).

It's not that bad. Another possibility is to do your delayed work in an IntentService -- triggered via a call to startService() -- and have it sleep on its background thread for a couple of seconds.

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Ok, just as i thought - i just didn't want to waste resources. I think i will go with the AlarmManager and use a single receiver for both tasks. Thank you! –  alibi Mar 31 '11 at 21:15
    
Ok, implemented it (it was easier than i thought), works flawlessly. Thank you again! –  alibi Mar 31 '11 at 21:56
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In addition to the first answer, you might want to consider what the API documentation says for the onReceive method:

[...] The function is normally called within the main thread of its process, so you should never perform long-running operations in it [...]

So it looks like generally it is not a good idea to start something that waits a couple of time within onReceive (even though, in your case it's less than the 10s limit).

I had a similar timinig problem with the BroadcastReceiver. I couldn't get my results processed even though I onReceive had been called with exactly what I was exepcting. It seemed that the thread the BroadastReceiver was running in, got killed before my result processing could finish. My solutuion was to kick off a new thread to perform all processing.

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