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Is there a better way to write this Ruby code? Please help to refactor.

def get_code(val)
    case val
    when 0..20 then 'E2'
    when 20..32 then 'E1'
    when 33..40 then 'D'
    when 41..50 then 'C2'
    when 51..60 then 'C1'
    when 61..70 then 'B2'
    when 71..80 then 'B1'
    when 81..90 then 'A2'
    when 91..100 then 'A1'
    else 'A0'
    end
 end
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2  
What's wrong with it? Seems perfectly understandable to me. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 31 '11 at 18:41
    
Too lengthy? Just wanted to see if any refactoring is possible. –  Vijay Dev Mar 31 '11 at 18:44
1  
Shorter does not mean better nor does it mean concise. –  mu is too short Mar 31 '11 at 19:05
2  
20..32 will never match 20, it should be 21..32. –  karatedog Mar 31 '11 at 21:32
1  
Code reviews should be on Code Review.SE. –  Jörg W Mittag Apr 1 '11 at 0:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
def get_code(val)
    if [31, 32].include?(val) then 'E1'
    else ['E2', 'E2', 'E1', 'D', 'C2', 'C1', 'B2', 'B1', 'A2', 'A1'][(val-1)/10] || 'A0'
    end
end

I am not sure about how you are dealing with 0, negatives. It looks like a grading system. If there is a mistake to my code, I think you will be able to fix it.

Update Another version:

def get_code(val)
    val += 1 if 0 == val
    val -= 2 if [31, 32].include?(val)
    ['E2', 'E2', 'E1', 'D', 'C2', 'C1', 'B2', 'B1', 'A2', 'A1'][(val-1)/10] || 'A0'
end
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7  
The clever answer. Please don't change your perfectly clear code to this. Think of the children. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 31 '11 at 18:55
2  
Good geek!!! :-) –  Vijay Dev Mar 31 '11 at 18:55
    
What does the ? after the (val) do? –  Vijay Dev Mar 31 '11 at 18:56
2  
@Vijay Dev, It is a magick. Ruby magick. It disappears after midnight :) –  fl00r Mar 31 '11 at 18:58
1  
@fl00r @Martinho @Vijay This situation reminds me of Zeller's congruence: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zeller%27s_congruence. Forcing a mildly irregular list to follow from a formula. –  sawa Mar 31 '11 at 19:58

Your code is quite good. For fun you can use hash instead of case.

def get_code(val)
  my_hash = { 0..20 => 'E2',
    20..32 => 'E1',
    33..40 => 'D',
    41..50 => 'C2',
    51..60 => 'C1',
    61..70 => 'B2',
    71..80 => 'B1',
    81..90 => 'A2',
    91..100 => 'A1' }
  my_hash.select{ |k, v| k === val }.first[1] rescue 'A0'
end

Or to make it more inline :)

def get_code(val)
  { 0..20 => 'E2', 20..32 => 'E1', 33..40 => 'D', 41..50 => 'C2', 51..60 => 'C1', 61..70 => 'B2', 71..80 => 'B1', 81..90 => 'A2', 91..100 => 'A1' }.select{ |k, v| k === val }.first[1] rescue 'A0'
end

and, as @Geo noticed, you should extract your hash out of method.

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But you would probably place the hash outside of the function, and add it to a class,right? Because if you would call this multiple times, you'd be creating a lot of Hashes only to access their keys once. –  Geo Mar 31 '11 at 18:52
    
of course. it is kind of a sketch ) –  fl00r Mar 31 '11 at 18:52

Not a refactoring, just a shorter way to write it:

def get_code(val)
    case val
    when 0..20
      'E2'
    when 20..32
      'E1'
    when 33..40
      'D'
    when 41..50
      'C2'
    # etc.
    else
      'A0'
    end
 end

Or you could substitute the then's with semi-colons:

case val
  when  0..20; 'E2'
  when 20..32; 'E1'
  #etc
  else 'A0'
end
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If this is the only instance of this pattern, then it's not worth shortening; it's perfectly clear as it is, and not very noisy.

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