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A friend of mine is interviewing for a job. One of the interview questions got me thinking, just wanted some feedback.

There are 2 non-negative integers: i and j. Given the following equation, find an (optimal) solution to iterate over i and j in such a way that the output is sorted.

2^i * 5^j

So the first few rounds would look like this:

2^0 * 5^0 = 1
2^1 * 5^0 = 2
2^2 * 5^0 = 4
2^0 * 5^1 = 5
2^3 * 5^0 = 8
2^1 * 5^1 = 10
2^4 * 5^0 = 16
2^2 * 5^1 = 20
2^0 * 5^2 = 25

Try as I might, I can't see a pattern. Your thoughts?

share|improve this question
49  
The optimal algorithm in terms of programmer time is to generate with two nested loops, then sort. Why do they ask questions like this? –  Tom Zych Mar 31 '11 at 20:32
19  
You may be able to determine transition points by looking at which number is greater. 2^2 < 5 but 2^3 > 5 so at that point you increase j. I think you can produce the output in O(n) rather than O(nlgn). @tom-zynch two nested loops is O(n^2). This question is very valid –  Mikhail Mar 31 '11 at 20:33
1  
There's only one output, so optimal solution is O(n). Read my solution below –  Mikhail Mar 31 '11 at 20:46
3  
A similar question has been addressed before apparently: stackoverflow.com/questions/4600048/nth-ugly-number. –  Aryabhatta Mar 31 '11 at 22:58
1  
... and the OP should probably choose an answer already. After all, he's already got plenty of good ones. –  abeln Apr 1 '11 at 0:06

17 Answers 17

up vote 91 down vote accepted

Dijkstra derives an eloquent solution in "A Discipline of Programming". He attributes the problem to Hamming. Here is my implementation of Dijkstra’s solution.

int main()
{
    const int n = 20;       // Generate the first n numbers

    std::vector<int> v(n);
    v[0] = 1;

    int i2 = 0;             // Index for 2
    int i5 = 0;             // Index for 5

    int x2 = 2 * v[i2];     // Next two candidates
    int x5 = 5 * v[i5];

    for (int i = 1; i != n; ++i)
    {
        int m = std::min(x2, x5);
        std::cout << m << " ";
        v[i] = m;

        if (x2 == m)
        {
            ++i2;
            x2 = 2 * v[i2];
        }
        if (x5 == m)
        {
            ++i5;
            x5 = 5 * v[i5];
        }
    }

    std::cout << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
16  
Relevant link: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regular_number#Algorithms. I don't think this is a very good interview question by the way. Here is a (handwritten paper) by Dijkstra where he provides and proves an algorithm for this problem: cs.utexas.edu/users/EWD/ewd07xx/EWD792.PDF –  Elian Ebbing Mar 31 '11 at 21:44
    
When the goal is "to iterate over i and j" you need less storage capacity, a FIFO is enough. See my Python solution. –  GaBorgulya Apr 1 '11 at 2:15
6  
When the goal is "to iterate over i and j", it is not the same problem. –  mhum Apr 1 '11 at 2:49
    
This is a really nice implementation, using a minimum of memory. It is linear memory even if you want only one number though. –  Thomas Ahle Feb 23 '12 at 0:10
    
@Andrey There are different version of this problem. Some start at 1, others at the smallest prime (2 here). My solution is a solution to the latter type of problem. Your second complain is simply wrong. Try to copy and paste my code and you will see that there are no duplicates. –  user515430 Mar 31 at 2:20

here is a more refined way of doing it (more refined than my previous answer, that is):

imagine the numbers are placed in a matrix:

     0    1    2    3    4    5   -- this is i
----------------------------------------------
0|   1    2    4    8   16   32
1|   5   10   20   40   80  160
2|  25   50  100  200  400  800
3| 125  250  500 1000 2000 ...
4| 625 1250 2500 5000 ...
j on the vertical

what you need to do is 'walk' this matrix, starting at (0,0). You also need to keep track of what your possible next moves are. When you start at (0,0) you only have two options: either (0,1) or (1,0): since the value of (0,1) is smaller, you choose that. then do the same for your next choice (0,2) or (1,0). So far, you have the following list: 1, 2, 4. Your next move is (1,0) since the value there is smaller than (0,3). However, you now have three choices for your next move: either (0,3), or (1,1), or (2,0).

You don't need the matrix to get the list, but you do need to keep track of all your choices (i.e. when you get to 125+, you will have 4 choices).

share|improve this answer
    
I voted this up because I was thinking along the same lines, but in the general case, wouldn't this be something like O(i^2 * j)? You'd have to check several numbers for each number you output. –  Tom Zych Mar 31 '11 at 21:10
    
@Tom you do have to check more than one number, but it's not that bad: when you output numbers between 125 and 625, you need to look at 4 values. between 625 and 3025, you look at 5 values. so really, it's j checks for every 1 output –  vlad Mar 31 '11 at 21:15
    
+1: Combine with this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/5000836/search-algorithm and looks like we have an O(n) solution. –  Aryabhatta Mar 31 '11 at 21:22
    
@Moron darn, I don't want to pay $25 for that algorithm, but it does look interesting. –  vlad Mar 31 '11 at 21:34
    
I don't think I could have figured it our without the matrix. Thanks! –  Trufa Apr 1 '11 at 3:22

Use a Min-heap.

Put 1.

extract-Min. Say you get x.

Push 2x and 5x into the heap.

Repeat.

Instead of storing x = 2^i * 5^j, you can store (i,j) and use a custom compare function.

share|improve this answer
1  
A heap would give lg n time on its operations, which pushes the complexity to n lg n. –  corsiKa Mar 31 '11 at 20:31
    
@glow: Yes, I don't see any O(n) solutions posted so far, though :-) –  Aryabhatta Mar 31 '11 at 20:34
    
@Moron: Well, user515430 already provided one ;) –  abeln Mar 31 '11 at 22:05
    
@abel: That comment is old :-) Seems like he will have problems going from (1,1) to (4,0) too. But viewing it as a young's matrix (see vlad's answer) actually does allow an O(n) time algorithm. –  Aryabhatta Mar 31 '11 at 22:27
    
@Moron: I don't think there's anything wrong with that solution. Certainly nothing wrong in the first 30 elements, which I just checked right now (that would cover the (1,1) -> (4,0) case). –  abeln Mar 31 '11 at 22:35

A FIFO-based solution needs less storage capacity. Python code.

F = [[1, 0, 0]]             # FIFO [value, i, j]
i2 = -1; n2 = n5 = None     # indices, nexts
for i in range(1000):       # print the first 1000
    last = F[-1][:]
    print "%3d. %21d = 2^%d * 5^%d" % tuple([i] + last)
    if n2 <= last: i2 += 1; n2 = F[i2][:]; n2[0] *= 2; n2[1] += 1
    if n5 <= last: i2 -= 1; n5 = F.pop(0); n5[0] *= 5; n5[2] += 1
    F.append(min(n2, n5))

output:

  0.                     1 = 2^0 * 5^0
  1.                     2 = 2^1 * 5^0
  2.                     4 = 2^2 * 5^0
 ...
998. 100000000000000000000 = 2^20 * 5^20
999. 102400000000000000000 = 2^27 * 5^17
share|improve this answer

You have to keep track of the individual exponents of them, and what their sums would be

so you start with f(0,0) --> 1 now you have to increment one of them:

f(1,0) = 2
f(0,1) = 5

so we know 2 is the next - we also know we can increment i's exponent up until the sum surpases 5.

You keep going back and forth like this until you're at your deisred number of rounds.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is not O(n). –  Aryabhatta Mar 31 '11 at 20:42
    
Yes it is. You do one O(1) operation for each round. Sometimes you do the round early, but when you get to that round you don't have to do it there, so it works itself out. –  corsiKa Mar 31 '11 at 20:45
17  
How do you go from (1,1) to (4,0)? Please elaborate exactly what your algorithm is. –  Aryabhatta Mar 31 '11 at 20:46
    
The problem is, you don't just have two incremental possibilities -- e.g., you aren't done with f(*,2) just because you found that f(a1,b+1)>f(a2,b). An incremental approach will eventually generate an unbounded number of pairs neighboring the region you've already output. –  comingstorm Mar 31 '11 at 21:25
    
@user515430 provided an implementation that was more than I could do on my lunch break, but that's what I was trying to get at. –  corsiKa Apr 1 '11 at 0:07

This is very easy to do O(n) in functional languages. The list l of 2^i*5^j numbers can be simply defined as 1 and then 2*l and 5*l merged. Here is how it looks in Haskell:

merge :: [Integer] -> [Integer] -> [Integer]
merge (a:as) (b:bs)   
  | a < b   = a : (merge as (b:bs))
  | a == b  = a : (merge as bs)
  | b > a   = b : (merge (a:as) bs)

xs :: [Integer]
xs = 1 : merge (map(2*)xs) (map(5*)xs)

The merge function gives you a new value in constant time. So does map and hence so does l.

share|improve this answer
    
Does this include 4*5?? –  GaBorgulya Apr 1 '11 at 2:22
    
I think that 'k' is not defined –  Ither Apr 1 '11 at 3:23
2  
let's just call this "merge" function union instead, as it is removing the duplicates. merge, as a part of mergesort, must preserve duplicates coming from both its input sequences. See Data.List.Ordered package for related stuff. –  Will Ness Apr 16 '12 at 15:37
1  
+1 for Data.List.Ordered.union. That makes it one line: xs = 1 : union (map (2*) xs) (map (5*) xs) –  Phob Sep 13 '12 at 23:53
    
@GaBorgulya Yes, it includes five times the list [1, 2, 4, 5,...] so it includes 5*4. –  Thomas Ahle Sep 14 '12 at 1:50

Using dynamic programming you can do this in O(n). Ground truth is that no values of i and j can give us 0, and to get 1 both values must be 0;

TwoCount[1] = 0
FiveCount[1] = 0

// function returns two values i, and j
FindIJ(x) {
    if (TwoCount[x / 2]) {
        i = TwoCount[x / 2] + 1
        j = FiveCount[x / 2]
    }
    else if (FiveCount[x / 5]) {
        i = TwoCount[x / 2]
        j = FiveCount[x / 5] + 1
    }
}

Whenever you call this function check if i and j are set, if they are not null, then populate TwoCount and FiveCount


C++ answer. Sorry for bad coding style, but i'm in a hurry :(

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

int * TwoCount;
int * FiveCount;

using namespace std;

void FindIJ(int x, int &i, int &j) {
        if (x % 2 == 0 && TwoCount[x / 2] > -1) {
                cout << "There's a solution for " << (x/2) << endl;
                i = TwoCount[x / 2] + 1;
                j = FiveCount[x / 2];
        } else if (x % 5 == 0 && TwoCount[x / 5] > -1) {
                cout << "There's a solution for " << (x/5) << endl;
                i = TwoCount[x / 5];
                j = FiveCount[x / 5] + 1;
        }    
}

int main() {
        TwoCount = new int[200];
        FiveCount = new int[200];

        for (int i = 0; i < 200; ++i) {
                TwoCount[i] = -1;
                FiveCount[i] = -1;
        }

        TwoCount[1] = 0;
        FiveCount[1] = 0;

        for (int output = 2; output < 100; output++) {
                int i = -1;
                int j = -1;
                FindIJ(output, i, j);
                if (i > -1 && j > -1) {
                        cout << "2^" << i << " * " << "5^" 
                                     << j << " = " << output << endl;
                        TwoCount[output] = i;
                        FiveCount[output] = j;
                }
        }    
}

Obviously you can use data structures other than array to dynamically increase your storage etc. This is just a sketch to prove that it works.

share|improve this answer
4  
This looks like an interesting answer, but I fail to see how it really works. Could you add more details ? –  David Brunelle Mar 31 '11 at 20:56
    
After studying it myself, I really don't see how it works. Assuming integer division, it'll give exactly the same result for 3 as for 2. Moreover, if the if conditions are tests for non-zero, it will never work, as there are no non-zero entries. –  David Thornley Mar 31 '11 at 21:18
    
Posted a C++ version for all you nay sayers. @David Your comments are correct, but my original code was pseudo code and I was thinking in scripting terms, so not-integer division and distinguishing between null entry and entry of value 0 –  Mikhail Mar 31 '11 at 21:56
    
this code enumerates all natural numbers, so, per comment of @ThomasAhle to the answer by "Lost in Alabama" below, it takes O(exp(sqrt(n))), to produce n numbers of the sequence. Linear algorithm exists, e.g. as given by ThomasAhle. –  Will Ness Jul 5 '12 at 19:45
    
You're right. In my understanding O(n) meant n being the last value, not number of printed items, which isn't correct. I don't know how functional languages work, or how merge works in constant time, but his answer got my upvote –  Mikhail Jul 6 '12 at 2:10

Why not try looking at this from the other direction. Use a counter to test the possible answers against the original formula. Sorry for the pseudo code.

for x = 1 to n
{
  i=j=0
  y=x
  while ( y > 1 )
  {
    z=y
    if y divisible by 2 then increment i and divide y by 2
    if y divisible by 5 then increment j and divide y by 5

    if y=1 then print i,j & x  // done calculating for this x

    if z=y then exit while loop  // didn't divide anything this loop and this x is no good 
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This runs in about O(4^sqrt(n)) because the nth number of the sequence is of approximately that size. –  Thomas Ahle Apr 1 '11 at 14:10

This is the relevant entry at OEIS.

It seems to be possible to obtain the ordered sequence by generating the first few terms, say

1 2 4 5

and then, starting from the second term, multiplying by 4 and 5 to get the next two

1 2 4 5 8 10

1 2 4 5 8 10 16 20

1 2 4 5 8 10 16 20 25

and so on...

Intuitively, this seems correct, but of course a proof is missing.

share|improve this answer
2  
Wrong :( [1 2 4 5 8 10 16 20 25 32 40 50 64 80 100 125 128 160 200 250 256 320 400 500 625 ] However 500 < 512 = 2^9 < 625. –  GaBorgulya Apr 1 '11 at 3:00
    
Thanks! That'll teach me to trust my "intuition" ;) –  abeln Apr 1 '11 at 14:28
    
128*4 = 512, so his solution DOES work. –  Nate Kerkhofs Nov 12 '13 at 11:53

You know that log_2(5)=2.32. From this we note that 2^2 < 5 and 2^3 > 5.

Now look a matrix of possible answers:

j/i  0   1   2   3   4   5
 0   1   2   4   8  16  32
 1   5  10  20  40  80 160 
 2  25  50 100 200 400 800
 3 125 250 500 ...

Now, for this example, choose the numbers in order. There ordering would be:

j/i  0   1   2   3   4   5
 0   1   2   3   5   7  10
 1   4   6   8  11  14  18
 2   9  12  15  19  23  27
 3  16  20  24...

Note that every row starts 2 columns behind the row starting it. For instance, i=0 j=1 comes directly after i=2 j=0.

An algorithm we can derive from this pattern is therefore (assume j>i):

int i = 2;
int j = 5;
int k;
int m;

int space = (int)(log((float)j)/log((float)i));
for(k = 0; k < space*10; k++)
{
    for(m = 0; m < 10; m++)
    {
        int newi = k-space*m;
        if(newi < 0)
            break;
        else if(newi > 10)
            continue;
        int result = pow((float)i,newi) * pow((float)j,m);
        printf("%d^%d * %d^%d = %d\n", i, newi, j, m, result);
    }
}   

NOTE: The code here caps the values of the exponents of i and j to be less than 10. You could easily extend this algorithm to fit into any other arbitrary bounds.

NOTE: The running time for this algorithm is O(n) for the first n answers.

NOTE: The space complexity for this algorithm is O(1)

share|improve this answer
    
You wrote "every row starts 2 columns behind the row starting it". However 2^9=512 and 5^4=625, so this is not true for row 4. –  GaBorgulya Apr 1 '11 at 0:01
    
@user678105 You are right. This code does not work. Sorry all. This code doesn't work because of the round off of the log and my assumption that it didn't matter. –  KLee1 Apr 1 '11 at 0:29
    
Here's how you fix this. On the (x,y) plane full of points with integral coefficients, draw a line from (0,1) to (log2(5),0). (0,0) is in the top left corner. X axis goes to the right, Y axis goes down. Now draw a line from the (0,0) origin point which is perpendicular to the 1st line. Now slide the first line along the second, further and further away from origin, and collect the integer-coordinates points as they are crossed over. For {2,3,5}-generated sequence, it'll be a plane moving across, in (i,j,k) space. If you can translate this idea into code, give me a shout-out. :) –  Will Ness Apr 16 '12 at 15:46

My implementation is based on the following ideas:

  • Use two queues Q2 and Q5, both initialized with 1. We will keep both queue in sorted order.
  • At every step, dequeue the smallest number element MIN from Q2 or Q5 and print it. If both Q2 and Q5 have the same element - remove both. Print this number. This is basically merging of two sorted arrays - at each step choose the smallest element and advance.
  • Enqueue MIN*2 to Q2 and MIN*5 to Q5. This change does not break the invariant of Q2/Q5 being sorted, because MIN is higher than previous MIN number.

Example:

Start with 1 and 1 (to handle i=0;j=0 case):
  Q2: 1
  Q5: 1
Dequeue 1, print it and enqueue 1*2 and 1*5:
  Q2: 2
  Q5: 5
Pick 2 and add 2*2 and 2*5:
  Q2: 4
  Q5: 5 10
Pick 4 and add 4*2 and 4*5:
  Q2: 8
  Q5: 5 10 20
....

Code in Java:

public void printNumbers(int n) {
    Queue<Integer> q2 = new LinkedList<Integer>();
    Queue<Integer> q5 = new LinkedList<Integer>();
    q2.add(1);
    q5.add(1);
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        int a = q2.peek();
        int b = q5.peek();
        int min = Math.min(a, b);
        System.out.println(min);
        if (min == a) {
            q2.remove();
        }
        if (min == b) {
            q5.remove();
        }
        q2.add(min * 2);
        q5.add(min * 5);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

calculate the results and put them in a sorted list, together with the values for i and j

share|improve this answer
    
That'll probably give you holes in the later end of your sequence. E.g. you'll have 2^n*5^n but not 2^(n+1)*5^(n-1) which is smaller. –  Thomas Ahle Mar 31 '11 at 23:32
    
@Thomas I'm not sure I follow your logic here. If you calculate one, why would you not also calculate the other? –  vlad Apr 1 '11 at 4:49
    
@vlad You need to have a limit on your i's and j's, don't you? Otherwise you'll never get to the sorting state, and hence you'll never return a single value. But for any limit n you choose, your list will be flawed. –  Thomas Ahle Apr 1 '11 at 14:04
    
@Thomas your argument still doesn't make sense. The OP never specified an end to his list of results. If he does, you can find the max i and j. –  vlad Apr 1 '11 at 14:13
    
@vlad As I read your answer, you first calculate the "results" / the 2^i*5^j values, and then sort them. If you don't have a limited number of "results", how will you ever get to the sorting step? –  Thomas Ahle Apr 1 '11 at 14:16

The algorithm implemented by user515430 by Edsger Dijkstra (http://www.cs.utexas.edu/users/EWD/ewd07xx/EWD792.PDF) is probably as fast as you can get. I call every number that is a form of 2^i * 5^j a "special number". Now vlads answer would be O(i*j) but with a double algorithm, one to generate the special numbers O(i*j) and one to sort them (according to the linked article also O(i*j).

But let's check Dijkstra's algorithm (see below). In this case n is the amount of special numbers we are generating, so equal to i*j. We are looping once, 1 -> n and in every loop we perform a constant action. So this algorithm is also O(i*j). And with a pretty blazing fast constant too.

My implementation in C++ with GMP (C++ wrapper), and dependancy on boost::lexical_cast, though that can be easily remove (I'm lazy, and who doesn't use Boost?). Compiled with g++ -O3 test.cpp -lgmpxx -o test. On Q6600 Ubuntu 10.10 time ./test 1000000 gives 1145ms.

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/lexical_cast.hpp>
#include <gmpxx.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    mpz_class m, x2, x5, *array, r;
    long n, i, i2, i5;

    if (argc < 2) return 1;

    n = boost::lexical_cast<long>(argv[1]);

    array = new mpz_class[n];
    array[0] = 1;

    x2 = 2;
    x5 = 5;
    i2 = i5 = 0;

    for (i = 1; i != n; ++i) {
        m = std::min(x2, x5);

        array[i] = m;

        if (x2 == m) {
            ++i2;
            x2 = 2 * array[i2];
        }

        if (x5 == m) {
            ++i5;
            x5 = 5 * array[i5];
        }
    }

    delete [] array;
    std::cout << m << std::endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

If you draw a matrix with i as the row and j as the column you can see the pattern. Start with i = 0 and then just traverse the matrix by going up 2 rows and right 1 column until you reach the top of the matrix (j >= 0). Then go i + 1, etc...

So for i = 7 you travel like this:

7, 0 -> 5, 1 -> 3, 2 -> 1, 3

And for i = 8:

8, 0 -> 6, 1 -> 4, 2 -> 2, 3 -> 0, 4

Here it is in Java going up to i = 9. It prints the matrix position (i, j) and the value.

for(int k = 0; k < 10; k++) {

    int j = 0;

    for(int i = k; i >= 0; i -= 2) {

        int value = (int)(Math.pow(2, i) * Math.pow(5, j));
        System.out.println(i + ", " + j + " -> " + value);
        j++;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

My Intuition :

If I take initial value as 1 where i=0, j=0, then I can create next numbers as (2^1)(5^0), (2^2)(5^0), (2^0)*(5^1), ... i.e 2,4,5 ..

Let say at any point my number is x. then I can create next numbers in the following ways :

  • x * 2
  • x * 4
  • x * 5

Explanation :

Since new numbers can only be the product with 2 or 5.
But 4 (pow(2,2)) is smaller than 5, and also we have to generate 
Numbers in sorted order.Therefore we will consider next numbers
be multiplied with 2,4,5.
Why we have taken x*4 ? Reason is to pace up i, such that it should not 
be greater than pace of j(which is 5 to power). It means I will 
multiply my number by 2, then by 4(since 4 < 5), and then by 5 
to get the next three numbers in sorted order.

Test Run

We need to take an Array-list of Integers, let say Arr.

Also put our elements in Array List<Integers> Arr.
Initially it contains Arr : [1]
  • Lets start with x = 1.

    Next three numbers are 1*2, 1*4, 1*5 [2,4,5]; Arr[1,2,4,5]

  • Now x = 2

    Next three numbers are [4,8,10] {Since 4 already occurred we will ignore it} [8,10]; Arr[1,2,4,5,8,10]

  • Now x =4

    Next three numbers [8,16,20] {8 already occurred ignore it} [16,20] Arr[1,2,4,5,8,10,16,20]

  • x = 5

    Next three numbers [10,20,25] {10,20} already so [25] is added Arr[1,2,4,5,8,10,16,20,25]

Termination Condition

 Terminating condition when Arr last number becomes greater 
 than (5^m1 * 2^m2), where m1,m2 are given by user.

Analysis

 Time Complexity : O(K) : where k is numbers possible between i,j=0 to 
 i=m1,j=m2.
 Space Complexity : O(K)
share|improve this answer

Just was curious what to expect next week and have found this question.

I think, the idea is 2^i increases not in that big steps as 5^j. So increase i as long as next j-step wouldn't be bigger.

The example in C++ (Qt is optional):

QFile f("out.txt"); //use output method of your choice here
f.open(QIODevice::WriteOnly);
QTextStream ts(&f);

int i=0;
int res=0;
for( int j=0; j<10; ++j )
{
    int powI = std::pow(2.0,i );
    int powJ = std::pow(5.0,j );
    while ( powI <= powJ  ) 
    {
        res = powI * powJ;
        if ( res<0 ) 
            break; //integer range overflow

        ts<<i<<"\t"<<j<<"\t"<<res<<"\n";
        ++i;
        powI = std::pow(2.0,i );

    }
}

The output:

i   j   2^i * 5^j
0   0   1
1   1   10
2   1   20
3   2   200
4   2   400
5   3   4000
6   3   8000
7   4   80000
8   4   160000
9   4   320000
10  5   3200000
11  5   6400000
12  6   64000000
13  6   128000000
14  7   1280000000
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This solution misses some combinations. For example, it doesnt examine the case where i=1,j=2 any case where i=1 and j>1 for that matter.. –  Federico Jul 22 at 18:00
    
@Federico: You are right! No wonder why I've failed google-interviews twice with 6 years interval but nearly the same questions :-) –  Valentin Heinitz Jul 23 at 8:14

Here is my solution

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>
#define N_VALUE 5
#define M_VALUE  5

int n_val_at_m_level[M_VALUE];

int print_lower_level_val(long double val_of_higher_level, int m_level)
{
int  n;
long double my_val;


for( n = n_val_at_m_level[m_level]; n <= N_VALUE; n++) {
    my_val =  powl(2,n) * powl(5,m_level);
    if(m_level != M_VALUE && my_val > val_of_higher_level) {
        n_val_at_m_level[m_level] = n;
        return 0;
    }
    if( m_level != 0) {
        print_lower_level_val(my_val, m_level - 1);
    }
    if(my_val < val_of_higher_level || m_level == M_VALUE) {
        printf("    %Lf n=%d m = %d\n", my_val, n, m_level);
    } else {
        n_val_at_m_level[m_level] = n;
        return 0;
    }
 }
 n_val_at_m_level[m_level] = n;
 return 0;
 }


 main()
 {
    print_lower_level_val(0, M_VALUE); /* to sort 2^n * 5^m */
 }

Result :

1.000000 n = 0 m = 0
2.000000 n = 1 m = 0
4.000000 n = 2 m = 0
5.000000 n = 0 m = 1
8.000000 n = 3 m = 0
10.000000 n = 1 m = 1
16.000000 n = 4 m = 0
20.000000 n = 2 m = 1
25.000000 n = 0 m = 2
32.000000 n = 5 m = 0
40.000000 n = 3 m = 1
50.000000 n = 1 m = 2
80.000000 n = 4 m = 1
100.000000 n = 2 m = 2
125.000000 n = 0 m = 3
160.000000 n = 5 m = 1
200.000000 n = 3 m = 2
250.000000 n = 1 m = 3
400.000000 n = 4 m = 2
500.000000 n = 2 m = 3
625.000000 n = 0 m = 4
800.000000 n = 5 m = 2
1000.000000 n = 3 m = 3
1250.000000 n = 1 m = 4
2000.000000 n = 4 m = 3
2500.000000 n = 2 m = 4
3125.000000 n = 0 m = 5
4000.000000 n = 5 m = 3
5000.000000 n = 3 m = 4
6250.000000 n = 1 m = 5
10000.000000 n = 4 m = 4
12500.000000 n = 2 m = 5
20000.000000 n = 5 m = 4
25000.000000 n = 3 m = 5
50000.000000 n = 4 m = 5
100000.000000 n = 5 m = 5
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