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Hi StackOverflow community,

I investigated some time here on StackOverflow to find good algorithms to split strings with multiple delimiters into a vector< string >. I also found some methods:

The Boost way:

boost::split(vector, string, boost::is_any_of(" \t"));

the getline method:

std::stringstream ss(string);
std::string item;
while(std::getline(ss, item, ' ')) {
    vector.push_back(item);
}

the tokenize way of Boost:

char_separator<char> sep(" \t");
tokenizer<char_separator<char>> tokens(string, sep);
BOOST_FOREACH(string t, tokens)
{
   vector.push_back(t);
}

and the cool STL way:

     istringstream iss(string);
     copy(istream_iterator<string>(iss),
     istream_iterator<string>(),
     back_inserter<vector<string> >(vector));

and the method of Shadow2531 (see the linked topic).

Most of them came from this topic. But they unfortunately don't solve my problem:

  • Boost's split is easy to use but with the big data (about 1.5*10^6 single elements in best cases) and about 10 delimiters I am using it's horrific slow.

  • The getline, STL and Shadow2531's method have the problem that I can only use one single char as delimiter. I need a few more.

  • Boost's tokenize is even more horrific in the aspect of speed. It took 11 seconds with 10 delimiters to split a string into 1.5*10^6 elements.

So I don't know what to do: I want to have a really fast string splitting algorithm with multiple delimiters.

Is boost's split the maximum or is there a way to do it faster?

Thanks for your help in advance! :)

Paul

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried multi threading? For instance split your delim into N groups, and for each group run a thread to split the string by that delim group and populate a list, then recombine the lists afterwards? –  gamernb Mar 31 '11 at 20:56
    
There must be some faster way. This: cat loremipsum_big.txt | ruby -e "ary = Array.new; ARGF.each {|x| ary << x.split(/a| /)}; puts ary" | wc -l creates 2.516.715 elements, pushes them into an array in 3.74 seconds in a Virtualboxed Ubuntu. –  karatedog Mar 31 '11 at 21:17
4  
How about some of the examples from the following article: codeproject.com/KB/recipes/Tokenizer.aspx They are very efficient. The String Toolkit Library makes complex string processing in C++ simple and easy. –  Curzon Kepler Jul 30 '11 at 9:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Two things come to mind:

  1. Use string views instead of strings as the split result, saves a lot of allocations.
  2. If you know you're only going to be working with chars (in the [0,255] range), try using a bitset to test membership instead of finding into the delimiter characters.

Here's a quick attempt at applying these ideas:

#include <vector>
#include <bitset>
#include <iostream>
#include <boost/algorithm/string/split.hpp>
#include <boost/algorithm/string/classification.hpp>
#include <boost/timer.hpp>

using namespace std;
size_t const N = 10000000;

template<typename C>
void test_custom(string const& s, char const* d, C& ret)
{
  C output;

  bitset<255> delims;
  while( *d )
  {
    unsigned char code = *d++;
    delims[code] = true;
  }
  typedef string::const_iterator iter;
  iter beg;
  bool in_token = false;
  for( string::const_iterator it = s.begin(), end = s.end();
    it != end; ++it )
  {
    if( delims[*it] )
    {
      if( in_token )
      {
        output.push_back(typename C::value_type(beg, it));
        in_token = false;
      }
    }
    else if( !in_token )
    {
      beg = it;
      in_token = true;
    }
  }
  if( in_token )
    output.push_back(typename C::value_type(beg, s.end()));
  output.swap(ret);
}

template<typename C>
void test_strpbrk(string const& s, char const* delims, C& ret)
{
  C output;

  char const* p = s.c_str();
  char const* q = strpbrk(p+1, delims);
  for( ; q != NULL; q = strpbrk(p, delims) )
  {
    output.push_back(typename C::value_type(p, q));
    p = q + 1;
  }

  output.swap(ret);
}

template<typename C>
void test_boost(string const& s, char const* delims)
{
  C output;
  boost::split(output, s, boost::is_any_of(delims));
}

int main()
{
  // Generate random text
  string text(N, ' ');
  for( size_t i = 0; i != N; ++i )
    text[i] = (i % 2 == 0)?('a'+(i/2)%26):((i/2)%2?' ':'\t');

  char const* delims = " \t[],-'/\\!\"§$%&=()<>?";

  // Output strings
  boost::timer timer;
  test_boost<vector<string> >(text, delims);
  cout << "Time: " << timer.elapsed() << endl;

  // Output string views
  typedef string::const_iterator iter;
  typedef boost::iterator_range<iter> string_view;
  timer.restart();
  test_boost<vector<string_view> >(text, delims);
  cout << "Time: " << timer.elapsed() << endl;

  // Custom split
  timer.restart();
  vector<string> vs;
  test_custom(text, delims, vs);
  cout << "Time: " << timer.elapsed() << endl;

  // Custom split
  timer.restart();
  vector<string_view> vsv;
  test_custom(text, delims, vsv);
  cout << "Time: " << timer.elapsed() << endl;

  // Custom split
  timer.restart();
  vector<string> vsp;
  test_strpbrk(text, delims, vsp);
  cout << "Time: " << timer.elapsed() << endl;

  // Custom split
  timer.restart();
  vector<string_view> vsvp;
  test_strpbrk(text, delims, vsvp);
  cout << "Time: " << timer.elapsed() << endl;

  return 0;
}

Compiling this with Boost 1.46.1 using GCC 4.5.1 with the -O4 flag enabled I get:

  • Time: 5.951 (Boost.Split + vector)
  • Time: 3.728 (Boost.Split + vector
  • Time: 1.662 (Custom split + vector)
  • Time: 0.144 (Custom split + vector)
  • Time: 2.13 (Strpbrk + vector)
  • Time: 0.527 (Strpbrk + vector)

NOTE: There's a slight difference in the output as empty tokens are dropped by my custom function. But you can adapt this code to your needs if you decide to use it.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Pablo, thanks for your answer! I tried to adapt your solution to my code but I failed using it properly: 1. problem: I don't know how to get the test_custom function to return C - I also don't know where to add the 'return'. 2. problem: vector<string_view> seems to be better but I am assigning the strings so I need a vector<string> or can I use the const_iterators of the strings? | I've pasted a simplified version of my code here: pastebin.com/0k6wNtFe –  Paul Engstler Apr 1 '11 at 13:41
    
See my edit. It now takes an output parameter to assign it the output tokens. As to the string views, they should remain valid as long as the original string is valid. If you're going to be working with them using the Boost string algorithms, the views are considered valid strings, only they don't own their contents. I don't know what you mean by "assigning the strings", so if you could explain that a bit, you could get some suggestions on how to proceed. –  Pablo Apr 1 '11 at 18:37
    
Thanks for editing your method. I adapted it and it kinda works but the whole function is making me trouble. strpbrk makes more sense for me to use as finding delimiters but somehow this messes things up. Also in this state it's nearly as fast/slow as boost's split method with vector<string>. pastebin.com/WU9wfEqg –  Paul Engstler Apr 1 '11 at 21:43
    
Ah, I almost forgot: Mostly this problem comes from the function strpbrk because it's not able to detect white spaces. How can I do that with that function? –  Paul Engstler Apr 1 '11 at 21:45
    
Well, the problem is that using strpbrk inside the loop that way is making the function iterate over the string's contents far more times than are needed. The original funcion I showed you checked each character in the string once. Using strpbrk if a word has N characters, instead of checking N times, you're checking N*(N+1)/2. –  Pablo Apr 1 '11 at 22:33

To combine the best parts of Pablo's and larsmans's answers, use a (offset, size) pair to store substrings and strcspn to get the extents of every entry.

share|improve this answer

On such large strings, it may pay off to use ropes instead. Or use string views as Pablo recommends: (char const*, size_t) pairs. The bitset trick is not necessary if you have a good implementation of strpbrk.

share|improve this answer

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