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I am trying to group a sorted list of strings by their initial letter. Let's say this is the list:

azaroth 
älgkebab 
orgel 
ölkorv

When the list is sorted according to sv-SE, this is the sort order:

azaroth 
orgel 
älgkebab 
ölkorv

Which means the grouping by initial letter would be

A
  azaroth
O
  orgel
Ä
  älgkebab
Ö 
  ölkorv

This makes sense, and this is also how you'd find it grouped in a phone book in a country which uses sv-SE.

When the list is sorted according to en-US, this is the sort order:

älgkebab 
azaroth 
ölkorv
orgel 

Now comes the interesting part. This means the grouping by initial letter would be

AÄ
  älgkebab
  azaroth
OÖ
  ölkorv
  orgel

Since for all practical purposes, "a" and "ä" were treated as the same letter during the sort, and so were "o" and "ö", which means they are for this purpose the same initial. This is AFAIK how you'd find it grouped in a phone book in a country which uses en-US.

My question is, how can I achieve this grouping programatically, when it varies by culture? Or in other words, how do you know which letters are being treated as "being the same" when sorting a list in a specific culture?

I haven't found a way to make a StringComparer return 0 for "a" vs "ä", for example.

I have a solution that seems to work, which does this:

if (
    cultureInfo.CompareInfo.GetSortKey("a").KeyData[1] ==
    cultureInfo.CompareInfo.GetSortKey("ä").KeyData[1]
) // same initial (this will return false for sv-SE and true for en-US)

Problem is, I have no idea whether it works for any culture, or even what the second piece of data in the KeyData array of the SortKey actually is. The page on MSDN is rather vague, and probably purposefully so. So I'd rather there was a more reliable solution.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you compare a and ä in sv-SE, the result is -1 so that if two words are the same, except for the umlaut, they are always sorted the same. But you can still figure out that they are sorted the same otherwise: Append some character to one of them and another, differently sorted to the other, and compare them. Then switch the added characters around and compare again. If the result is the different, the characters are sorted the same.

Example:

sv-SE:
"a0" < "ä1"
"a1" < "ä0"
en-US:
"a0" < "ä1"
"a1" > "ä0"

Thus, in sv-SE, 'a' < 'ä', but in en-US 'a' == 'ä'. Below is a class that groups a list of strings according to these rules. But it doesn't work properly for some cultures, because their sort order is more complex. For example in Czech, ch is considered a separate letter, sorted after h. I have no idea how would you fix that.

Also, the code uses 0 and 1 as the characters to append. If there are some cultures where these characters don't affect the sort, it wouldn't work.

class Grouper
{
    StringComparer m_comparer;

    public Grouper(StringComparer comparer)
    {
        m_comparer = comparer;
    }

    public List<Tuple<string, List<string>>> Group(IEnumerable<string> strings)
    {
        List<Tuple<string, List<string>>> result =
            new List<Tuple<string, List<string>>>();

        var sorted = strings.OrderBy(s => s, m_comparer);

        string previous = null;

        List<char> currentGroupName = null;
        List<string> currentGroup = null;

        foreach (var s in sorted)
        {
            char sInitial = ToUpper(s[0]);
            if (currentGroup == null || !AreEqual(s[0], previous[0]))
            {
                if (currentGroup != null)
                    result.Add(Tuple.Create(
                        SortGroupName(currentGroupName),
                        currentGroup));
                currentGroupName = new List<char> { sInitial };
                currentGroup = new List<string> { s };
            }
            else
            {
                if (!currentGroupName.Contains(sInitial))
                    currentGroupName.Add(sInitial);
                currentGroup.Add(s);
            }

            previous = s;
        }

        if (currentGroup != null)
            result.Add(Tuple.Create(SortGroupName(currentGroupName), currentGroup));

        return result;
    }

    string SortGroupName(List<char> chars)
    {
        return new string(chars.OrderBy(c => c.ToString(), m_comparer).ToArray());
    }

    bool AreEqual(char c1, char c2)
    {
        return Math.Sign(m_comparer.Compare(c1 + "0", c2 + "1")) ==
            -Math.Sign(m_comparer.Compare(c1 + "1", c2 + "0"));
    }

    char ToUpper(char c)
    {
        return c.ToString().ToUpper()[0];
    }
}

Also, this class is far from production-quality, for example, it doesn't handle nulls or empty strings.

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Interesting. This is very similar to what I currently have, except for AreEqual where I use the SortKey. Your AreEqual is an elegant way of making "StringComparer return 0 for 'a' vs 'ä'" as I wrote in the question. :) –  bzlm Apr 1 '11 at 7:19

Its likely an implementation-internal value, similar to constants. The value itself doesn't matter, only how it compares to other related values.

This is similar to (for example) the EOF value in C. While GCC defines it as -1, the actual value MAY vary, and so end-developer code should only compare the value, never evaluate it.

share|improve this answer
    
That's true. I'm looking for a solution to the general grouping problem which doesn't rely on implementation details. –  bzlm Apr 1 '11 at 7:20

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