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I would like to write a function that handles multiple data types. Below is an example that works but seems clunky. Is there a standard (or better) way of doing this?

(It's times like this I miss Matlab where everything is one type :>)

myfunc = function(x) {
  # does some stuff to x and returns a value
  # at some point the function will need to find out the number of elements
  # at some point the function will need to access an element of x.
  #
  # args: 
  #   x: a column of data taking on many possible types
  #      e.g., vector, matrix, data.frame, timeSeries, list
  x.vec <- as.vector(as.matrix(as.data.frame(x)))
  n <- length(x.vec)
  ret <- x.vec[n/3]  # this line only for concreteness 
  return(ret)
}
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Languages with only one type drive me nuts ;-). Classes are your friend, and let you handle things nice and flexibly. Use the OO features of R as outlined below. S3 methods are extremely lightweight and really add very little extra work. In exchange, you get wonderful behavior, like being able to call summary() on just about anything. –  Ari B. Friedman Mar 31 '11 at 23:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Use S3 methods. A quick example to get you started:

myfunc <- function(x) {
    UseMethod("myfunc",x)
}
myfunc.data.frame <- function(x) {
    x.vec <- as.vector(as.matrix(x))
    myfunc(x.vec)
}
myfunc.numeric <- function(x) {
    n <- length(x)
    ret <- x[n/3]
    return(ret)
}
myfunc.default <- function(x) {
    stop("myfunc not defined for class",class(x),"\n")
}

Two notes:

  1. The ... syntax passes any additional arguments on to functions. If you're extending an existing S3 method (e.g. writing something like summary.myobject), then including the ... is a good idea, because you can pass along arguments conventionally given to the canonical function.

print.myclass <- function(x,...) { print(x$keyData,...) }

  1. You can call functions from other functions and keep things nice and parsimonious.
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It's not a good idea to always include ... in your function signatures because you will never get error messages if you misspell an argument name. –  hadley Apr 1 '11 at 2:35
    
@Hadley: I seem to recall one of the Chambers books stating it was a good habit, but I definitely defer to you an all things R! I'll see if I can't look it up soonish and post more on the logic behind it if I can find it. –  Ari B. Friedman Apr 1 '11 at 2:37
    
the issue is one of whether you need extra args or not. If you don't need to pass extra args on to other methods then you don't need ... at all. The one downside is that you are then committed to not having any other arguments for your methods. So there is a choice and @hadley's comment mentions a downside of using ... –  Gavin Simpson Apr 2 '11 at 17:43
    
@Gavin: Makes sense. Updated to hopefully clarify. –  Ari B. Friedman Apr 2 '11 at 18:07

Hmm, your documentation for the function is

# args: 
#   x: a column of data taking on many possible types
#      e.g., vector, matrix, data.frame, timeSeries, list

and if one supplies an object as you claim is require, isn't it already a vector and not a matrix or a data frame, hence obviating the need for separate methods/specific handling?

> dat <- data.frame(A = 1:10, B = runif(10))
> class(dat[,1])
[1] "integer"
> is.vector(dat[,1])
[1] TRUE
> is.vector(dat$A)
[1] TRUE
> is.numeric(dat$A)
[1] TRUE
> is.data.frame(dat$A)
[1] FALSE

I would:

myfunc <- function(x) {
  # args: 
  #   x: a column of data taking on many possible types
  #      e.g., vector, matrix, data.frame, timeSeries, list
  n <- length(x)
  ret <- x[n/3]  # this line only for concreteness 
  return(ret)
}

> myfunc(dat[,1])
[1] 3

Now, if you want to handle different types of objects and extract a column, then S3 methods would be a way to go. Perhaps your example is over simplified for actual use? Anyway, S3 methods would be something like:

myfunc <- function(x, ...)
    UseMethod("myfunc", x)

myfunc.matrix <- function(x, j = 1, ...) {
    x <- x[, j]
    myfunc.default(x, ...)
}

myfunc.data.frame <- function(x, j = 1, ...) {
    x <- data.matrix(x)
    myfunc.matrix(x, j, ...)
}

myfunc.default <- function(x, ...) {
    n <- length(x)
    x[n/3]
}

Giving:

> myfunc(dat)
[1] 3
> myfunc(data.matrix(dat))
[1] 3
> myfunc(data.matrix(dat), j = 2)
[1] 0.2789631
> myfunc(dat[,2])
[1] 0.2789631
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You probably should try to use an S3 method for writing a function that will handle multiple datatypes.
A good reference is here: http://www.biostat.jhsph.edu/~rpeng/biostat776/classes-methods.pdf

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