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I have a model class that keeps track record being built by multiple views. It has a NSMutableDictionary that has the fields and values I eventually write to the database. It is saved to a plist and loaded back when needed. I thought that I was keeping track of my memory, but it throws a EXC_BAD_ACCESS when I try to release the Dictionary. Here is my interface:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>


@interface CurrentEntryModel : NSObject {
 NSMutableDictionary *currentEntry;
}

@property (nonatomic, retain) NSMutableDictionary *currentEntry;
- (void) setValue: (NSString *)value;
- (NSString *) getValue;

@end

My understanding is that currentEntry should be retained and I would have to release it during dealloc.

Here is my implementation (this isn't the entire class just the relevant parts):

#import "CurrentEntryModel.h"


@implementation CurrentEntryModel

@synthesize currentEntry;

-(id) init {
    if ( self = [super init] )
    {
    //check for file
    NSFileManager *fileManager = [NSFileManager defaultManager];
    NSString *file;
    file = @"location.plist";

    if ([fileManager fileExistsAtPath:file]){ 
        NSLog(@"file exists");
        currentEntry = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] initWithContentsOfFile:file];

    }else {
        NSLog(@"file doesn't exist");
        currentEntry = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc ] initWithCapacity:1];

        NSDate *testDate = [NSDate date];

        [currentEntry setObject:testDate forKey:@"created"];

        [currentEntry writeToFile:file atomically:YES];

    }

}
return self;
}

- (void) setValue: (NSString *)value {
[currentEntry setObject:value forKey:@"location"];
}

- (NSString *) getValue {
return [currentEntry objectForKey:@"location"];
}


- (void) dealloc{
[currentEntry release];
[super dealloc];

}

@end

If I init this class it will automatically create the dictionary and if I call one of the set or get methods it seems like the dictionary is retained as it will dealloc correctly. If the class is just initialized and then no methods are called it will throw the EXC_BAD_ACCESS errors. If I am not mistaken when the file doesn't exist I don't initialize the dictionary correctly because the method starts with dictionary and not init. Although every time I run this the file is there so it always uses the the file found logic and I thought that that will retain the variable.

Am I not initializing the dictionary correctly?

Edit - changed the code on the convenience method to reflect the proper way. Everyone take note of what Squeegy has to say.

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I appreciate the the information about class methods, but I have stated in my question this was not the source of the error - Although every time I run this the file is there so it always uses the the file found logic and I thought that that will retain the variable. Does anyone have any ideas? –  Joshua Apr 7 '11 at 1:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is bad bad bad.

else {
        NSLog(@"file doesn't exist");
        currentEntry = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc ] dictionaryWithCapacity:1];

dictionaryWithCapacity: is a class method on NSMutableDictionary which returns an autoreleased object, and you don't retain it. So the run loop ends, and the dictionary gets autoreleased. Then you run [currentEntry release] in your dealloc and it explodes because that object is deallocated already.

you probably wan't initWithCapacity: instead. Always pair alloc with a method that starts with init.


Also, when using retained properties like this, I usually let the property figure this out for me, and only work with autoreleased objects. You just have to remember less rules, and there are less gotchas.

- (id)init {
  // ...
  self.currentEntry = [NSMutableDictionary dictionWithContentsOfFile:file];
  // ...
}

- (void)dealloc {
  //...
  self.currentEntry = nil;
  //...
}

This way you never have to call retain or release directly on the object. In my experience, this results in less confusing bugs. But it's also point of style among many ObjC programmer that not everyone agrees with.

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Yeah I found this out today and referenced it in my question when researching an answer. Most of the tutorials I read don't reference that convenience methods autorelease and you need to use something that starts with init. I did change that and it stills throws the EXC_BAD_ACCESS error. –  Joshua Mar 31 '11 at 23:31
    
From the memory management rules: "Just as you shouldn’t be concerned with an object’s actual retain count, you shouldn’t be concerned about whether an object returned to you is autoreleased or not. The only concern is, do you own it or not." It is a little disadvantageous to assume whether objects returned to you are autoreleased. In particular, [NSNumber numberWithInt:0] will give you an object you don't own, but one that is typically not autoreleased either (it is usually cached). –  dreamlax Mar 31 '11 at 23:35
    
That's a good point. init, retain, or property assignment all mean "I own this". –  Alex Wayne Apr 1 '11 at 0:23
    
I have edited the question to reflect this, but it still does not answer the question. Even with an init method it still will throw an EXC_BAD_ACCESS. My understanding is that this should be retained. –  Joshua Apr 7 '11 at 1:48

Joshua -

+ (id)dictionaryWithCapacity:(NSUInteger)numItems

is a class method of NSDictionary. So when you call it, it should be:

[NSMutableDictionary dictionaryWithCapacity:1];

Not:

[[NSMutableDictionary alloc] dictionaryWithCapacity:1];

Further, [NSMutableDictionary dictionaryWithCapacity:] returns an autoreleased object. If you want to keep the dictionary as an ivar and not have it autoreleased on the next cycle of the run loop, you should call:

[currentEntry retain];

So, basically, change it to:

currentEntry = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] initWithCapacity:1];

or:

currentEntry = [[NSMutableDictionary dictionaryWithCapacity:1] retain];

The first one probably makes more sense, since the connivence class methods were designed to be used when you wanted an autoreleased instance.

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Don't make assumptions about whether objects returned from class methods are "autoreleased", instead you should be concerned only about whether or not you own the object. From the memory management rules: "Just as you shouldn’t be concerned with an object’s actual retain count, you shouldn’t be concerned about whether an object returned to you is autoreleased or not. The only concern is, do you own it or not." –  dreamlax Mar 31 '11 at 23:32

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