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I'm not used to c++ and I'm having a problem writing a constructor.
See this example, is a short version of the code I'm working on:

class B {
public:
  B(int x);
}

class A {
public:
  B b;
  A(){
    // here I have to initialize b
  }
}

That throws a compiler error since I need to initialize b in A's constructor because B does not have a default constructor.

I think I have do it in the initialization list, but the B(int x) argument is a value I have to calculate with some algorithm, so I don't know how this should be properly done, or if I'm missing something or doing it wrong.

In other language like java I would have a reference to B and initialize it inside the A's constructor after the other code I need to get the value for the initialization.

What would be the right way to initialize b in this case?

Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You can invoke functions in your constructor initializer list

class B {
public:
  B(int x);
}; // note semicolon

class A {
public:
  B b;

  A()
  :b(calculateValue()) {
    // here I have to initialize b
  }

  static int calculateValue() {
    /* ... */
  }
}; // note semicolon

Note that in the initializer list, the class is considered completely defined, so you can see members declared later on too. Also better not use non-static functions in the constructor initializer list, since not all members have yet been initialized at that point. A static member function call is fine.

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Thanks, that worked. Tough I thought there could be a better/cleaner way. –  Damian Apr 1 '11 at 0:06
    
Also make sure that functions that are used in member-initializer list will not throw any exceptions. :) –  Viren Apr 1 '11 at 0:20
    
Though this works... does it have to be that horrible?? This lefts all my related code mixed all around the file. The object construction in one side, the object configuration in other side, etc.... Maybe it's just better to have a default constructor that makes a not-working instance and then create a new intance inside the constructor. What do you think? –  Damian Apr 1 '11 at 3:01
    
You could just have a default constructor and then add Init() method to the class that would actually pass in your int. Not sure if you'd really want or need another class inside the class. –  DXM Apr 1 '11 at 5:26

You use an initializer list, something like this:

A() : b(f(x)) {}
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#include<iostream>

class B {
    public:
        B(){} // A default constructor is a must, if you have other variations of constructor
        B(int x){}
}; // class body ends with a semicolon

class A {
    private:
        B b;
    public:
        A(){
            // here I have to initialize b
        }
        void write(){
            std::cout<<"Awesome";
        }
};

int main(){
    A a;
    a.write();
}

In C++, if you have a constructor that takes an argument, a default constructor is a must, unlike other languages as Java. That's all you need to change. Thanks.

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1  
-1: no, a default ctor is not required. +1 for noting that a semicolon is needed. Still at zero... –  Jerry Coffin Mar 31 '11 at 23:33

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