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In the program I'm currently writing, I find myself doing the following a lot...

Map<String,List<String>> network = loadSerializedObj(file); // null if failed
if(network != null) {
    anonNet = util.anonymize(newNet);
} else {
    // Some sort of error handling.
    System.out.println("Some sort of error message. Exiting...");
    System.exit(0);        
}

Is there a more succinct way of handling the event that loading the serialized object from file doesn't work and the method returns null? Any tips at all are welcome. Anywhere I can make this more elegant?

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Apart from checking if network is null, is it used elsewhere? If not, you could just say if (loadSerializedObj(file) != null), which condenses your code a little. –  mre Apr 1 '11 at 2:21

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

you should make loadSerializedObj throw an exception instead of return null. you can return null when you don't have anything to return. when something breaks, you should throw an exception.

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I typically do this as well. –  mre Apr 1 '11 at 1:58

In this case you can use the exception catch.

Map<String,List<String>> network = loadSerializedObj(file); // null if failed
try {
    anonNet = util.anonymize(newNet);
} catch(NullPointerException npe) {
    System.out.println("Some sort of error message. Exiting...");
    System.exit(0);        
}

but you must specify the util.anonymize to throw the NullPointerException if it does not it yet.

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-1 ouch! why would you use an exception for a normal flow of a program? –  iluxa Apr 1 '11 at 1:33
1  
to treat exception! –  Rafael Melo Macieira Apr 1 '11 at 1:34
1  
This is not a normal flow! this is an exception: "Some sort of error message. Exiting..." this is an error case! –  Rafael Melo Macieira Apr 1 '11 at 1:38

you could have some kind of

class MyAssert {
  static<T> assertNotNull(T object) {
    if (object == null) {
      System.out.println("something is wrong...");
      System.exit(0);
    }
    return object;
  }
}
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Try returning an empty map instead of a null value:

    if(!loadSerializedObj(file).isEmpty()) 
    {
        anonNet = util.anonymize(newNet);
    } 
    else 
    {
        // error handling    
    }

    private Map<String,List<String>> loadSerializedObj(File file) 
    {
        // do stuff
        if(mapObject == null)
        {
            mapObject = Collections.emptyMap();
        }
        return mapObject
    }
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You could do a static import of a function named n(object) that returns boolean if null. Or use Groovy :)

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I think what you have is as good as it gets while maintaining easy to read/maintain code.

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Guava's preconditions can be a good way to put in succinct readable checks.

Preconditions.checkNotNull(myReference, "My error message");
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