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I have an SVN repo with a layout like
project1/trunk
project1/branches
project1/tags
project2/trunk
project2/branches
project2/tags
etc.

For a number of reasons, I'd like a git-svn repo that allows me to work on any of these projects and fetch/dcommit from/to all of them at once. Is this kind of thing possible? I know I could just git-svn clone the whole thing without specifying branches, tags, and trunk, but then I'd lose a lot of the advantage of using git.

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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This is how I did it. There may be simpler ways, though.

  1. Select the first project with the standard layout you'd like to work on and git svn clone it:

    git svn clone --stdlayout http://sample.com/svn/repository-name/project-name repository-name

  2. Go into the repository-name directory and edit its .git/config file. You could also do this with git-config commands, but I find it easier in a text editor.

  3. You'll see an [svn-remote "svn"] section already defined for your first project. Rename the svn-remote to something more unique than "svn", probably the same as your project name. E.g., [svn-remote "project-name"].

  4. Make more [svn-remote "project-name"] sections for each project, following the template of the first one. Give each one a unique name! You'll need to change the fetch, branches, and tags settings to use the correct Subversion directory names for each project.

  5. Once you're done, save your file and run git svn fetch --fetch-all. The other projects will be fetched as remotes in your local repository.

  6. To switch your master between projects, do a git reset --hard other-project-name/trunk, just like if you were switching to work on any other remote Subversion branch.

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Will a git svn rebase rebase all of the projects? Will a git svn dcommit commit all the changes? –  Shea Levy Apr 1 '11 at 3:14
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git svn rebase just gets you revisions for your current HEAD, so no, all you get is the current branch on the current project. Same for git svn dcommit. To get every project you need to do a git svn fetch --fetch-all and then rebase your current HEAD. Unfortunately I don't know of an equivalent to commit all local branches that are ahead of their remotes, but I'm sure it could be scripted. –  Mark Gardner Apr 1 '11 at 3:20
1  
This is what I was looking for. To simplify, in step 1 add -R project1-name --prefix=project1-name/ to the git svn clone command to have the initial clone use the right svn-remote name and branch prefixes from the start. –  Shea Levy Apr 1 '11 at 14:06
1  
@MarkGardner: But you have to switch between projects, right? You cannot have all projects checked out simultaneously? –  krlmlr Jul 5 '12 at 8:16
    
Correct, that's what step 6 above says. –  Mark Gardner Nov 23 '12 at 3:21
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To get around the issue of checking out multiple projects simultaneously, git-new-workdir can be used to check out multiple working directories from the same git repository, see https://github.com/git/git/blob/master/contrib/workdir/git-new-workdir

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