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I'm creating a stored procedure which can increment the value of a counter and return if that invocation was responsible for reaching the MaxValue. The tricky part is this procedure will be call quickly and in parallel from different threads and different machines.

Example scenario:

Two threads executing in parallel call the same stored procedure to increment the same counter. Lets assume CounterId = 5 is passed in as a parameter for both. Before either executes the Counter record currently has field values of CounterValue = 9 and a MaxValue = 10.

What I want to happen is for one of the procedures to successfully increment the CurrentValue to 10 and return a result indicating it was responsible for making the change which caused CounterValue to reach the MaxValue. The other procedure should not increment the value (since it would go past 10) and should return a result indicating that the MaxReach was already met for the counter.

I thought about performing a query before or after but it seems that could leave a 'hole' where a change could be made by separate thread and cause a false positive/negative to be returned.

This is just a start of an idea for the procedure. I feel like it needs locking, a transaction or something?

UPDATE SomeCounters
SET CounterValue = (CounterValue + @AddValue),
    MaxReached = CASE WHEN MaxValue = (CurrentValue + 1) THEN 1 ELSE 0
WHERE CounterId = @CounterId
  AND MaxReached = 0
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You would need a transaction, and is this for a real requirement? What's it for? –  John Saunders Apr 1 '11 at 2:36
    
Yes it it a real requirement. I'm tracking a stream of data coming in and I need to record the number of times the data matches a specific criteria and then trigger additional work when the MaxValue has been met. The current system has the Data and Counters stored in Azure Table Storage and using Optimistic Concurrency to manage who 'won' by performing the final increment needed. I need better performance so I want to move the counters to SQL Azure. –  Vyrotek Apr 1 '11 at 3:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use OUTPUT

DECLARE @temp TABLE (MaxReached BIT NOT NULL);

UPDATE SomeCounters
  SET CounterValue = (CounterValue + @AddValue),
      MaxReached = CASE WHEN MaxValue = (CurrentValue + 1) THEN 1 ELSE 0
  WHERE CounterId = @CounterId
    AND MaxReached = 0
  OUTPUT INSERTED.MaxReached INTO @temp

The update is atomic and you can then select the value out of the @temp table and do whatever you want with it. This way you'll be able to capture the exact update that caused MaxReached to be set to true (1).

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I implemented this and it seems to work great. –  Vyrotek Apr 2 '11 at 15:23

You need to wrap it in a transaction and add a select within the same transaction, as follows:

BEGIN TRANSACTION; 

UPDATE SomeCounters
SET CounterValue = (CounterValue + @AddValue)
WHERE CounterId = @CounterId;

SELECT CASE WHEN MaxValue = CurrentValue THEN 1 ELSE 0 MaxReached
FROM SomeCounters
WHERE CounterId = @CounterId;

COMMIT TRANSACTION;

You can put that last part into an output parameter so that it's returned from the proc.

share|improve this answer
    
So wrapping both statements with a Transaction will ensure that when the Select query is called it will return the row with changes only made by the previous update statement? Meaning, it is not possible for an Update to occur in Proc B before Proc A has a chance to perform the Select? –  Vyrotek Apr 1 '11 at 2:53
    
@Vyrotek - Actually, to get that level of isolation you would also need to set the transaction isolation level to Serializable. –  Thomas Apr 1 '11 at 3:53
    
Not necessarily. When you do an update, it takes out a WRITE lock on the row automatically. Until you commit the transaction, nobody else can write to it, and only those OTHER transactions running under READ_UNCOMMITTED can read the updated value before the transaction is committed. –  squawknull Apr 1 '11 at 4:06
1  
Actually, one comment, if you're running snapshot isolation, things could get a bit uglier. Most people don't though. It trashes tempdb for databases with any significant level of volume going through them. –  squawknull Apr 1 '11 at 4:08
    
Thanks for your comments squaknull. I'm pretty sure everything on the server is set at the default isolation level for SQL Server 2008. This seems like the most straight forward solution so far. –  Vyrotek Apr 1 '11 at 4:25

One way to achieve what you are looking for is to take a pessimistic approach; meaning that each stored procedure only updates a record if it wasn't modified by another stored procedure, and try again until the max is reached. To do this you need to read the current value before the update, then update the record with a WHERE clause that expects the value to be the same. You also need a loop if you need to make sure the call eventually succeeds. Using this approach only 1 stored procedure will update the table at a time, and retry the work until the max is reached.

Something like this:

DECLARE @savedValue int
DECLARE @maxedReached int
-- read current values for concurrency
SELECT @savedValue = CounterValue, @maxedReached = MaxReached 
  FROM SomeCounters WHERE CounterId = @counterId)

WHILE(@maxedReached = 0)
BEGIN

  UPDATE SomeCounters
  SET CounterValue = (CounterValue + @AddValue),    
    MaxReached = CASE WHEN MaxValue = (CurrentValue + 1) THEN 1 ELSE 0 END
  WHERE 
    CounterId = @CounterId  
    AND MaxReached = 0
    -- the next clause ensures that only one stored procedure will succeed
    AND CounterValue = @savedValue  

  if (@@rowcount = 0)
  BEGIN
    -- failed... another procedure made the change?
    -- If @maxReached becomes 1, the loop will exit and you will
    -- know the maximum was reached; if not the loop will try updating
    -- the value again
    -- read the values for concurrency again.
    SELECT @savedValue = CounterValue, @maxedReached = MaxReached 
        FROM SomeCounters WHERE CounterId = @counterId)

  END
END
share|improve this answer

Another strategy I'm investigating is the use of sp_getapplock within a transaction. It seems this would allow me create a unique string for the counter I'm trying to update and block other concurrent executions until it is finished.

This seems particularly useful since my procedure will also contain some IF EXISTS ... ELSE ... logic which will handle either creating the counter record for the first time or updating and existing one.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189823.aspx - sp_getapplock

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Assuming that MaxValue is well-known, and is the same for each counter, then you don't need transactions:

UPDATE CounterTable
SET Counter=Counter+1
WHERE CounterId = @CounterId

This is a database, not a multi-threaded program. This is a request to SQL Server to increment the value of the Counter column of one row of the table. SQL Server will do that - I don't think that it will permit the table to lose one of the requests.

So, at worst, you might wind up with Counter > MaxValue. But if you know what MaxValue is, then you know that any value above it really means MaxValue. There's no need to instantly schedule the work in the same transaction.

So, depending on how time-critical the "extra work" is, simply have a job or other program query the table looking for any counter values greater or equal to MaxValue, and do the work right there. At worst, create a trigger to go off on every UPDATE, which only does any work when the counter value is high.

No need for transactions, unless you need the "extra work" to execute in the same transaction that does the counter update. Since you don't say that you're using transactions for that now, I suspect that you don't need the "extra work" to occur in the same transaction.

share|improve this answer
    
The extra work I'm talking about is C# code which should run immediately after execution of the procedure only if the update just performed was the one which caused it to reach the MaxValue. I don't want CurrentValue to ever grow past MaxValue. I cannot use jobs because they are not available in SQL Azure. –  Vyrotek Apr 1 '11 at 3:43
    
Please update your answer to include this. It's important. –  John Saunders Apr 1 '11 at 15:53

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