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I am writing a program which reads and parses a CSV file, populates a struct with the contents of CSV file and then writes the struct to a file in binary mode. I am parsing csv fileby tokenizing it and writing each token to struct. The problem is that when I try to write this struct to data file, the file contents show some special character i.e it writes any random value. I am attaching my output.dat file. Can anyone pls help me in finding uot where I am wrong? Thanks.

Here is my code:

typedef struct  
{
    int AccountNumber;  
    char    *AccountName;  
    double  AccountBalance;  
    double  LastPaymentAmount;  
    char    *LastPaymentDate;  
} Person;

FILE    *fpData;        

Person temp = {0,"",0,0,0};

if ( ( fpData = fopen( "input.csv", "r" ) ) == NULL ) //Reading a file
{
    printf( "File could not be opened.\n" );
}

while(fgets(buf, BUFFER_SIZE, fpData) != NULL)
{
    /* Here we tokenize our string and scan for " \n" characters */

    // for(tok = strtok(buf,"\n");tok;tok=strtok(NULL,"\n"))
    // {
        tok = strtok(buf, ",");
        temp.AccountNumber = atoi(tok); 
        printf(" %i ",temp.AccountNumber );

        tok = strtok(NULL, ",");

        temp.AccountName = tok;
        printf("%s ",temp.AccountName );

        tok = strtok(NULL, ",");

        temp.AccountBalance = atof(tok);
        printf("temp.AccountBalance = %f ",temp.AccountBalance );

        tok = strtok(NULL, ",");

        temp.LastPaymentAmount = atof(tok);
        printf("temp.LastPaymentAmount = %f ",temp.LastPaymentAmount );

        tok = strtok(NULL, ",");

        temp.LastPaymentDate = tok;  
        printf("temp.LastPaymentDate = %s ",temp.LastPaymentDate );

        tok = strtok(NULL, ",");
        printf("\n");                 
    // }  
}

if ( ( fpData = fopen( "output.dat", "wb" ) ) == NULL )  
{  
   printf( "File could not be opened.\n" );  
}  
else  
{  
    printf("\nFileName is:%s\n",argv[2]);  
    printf("File will be overwritten. Do you want to continue?\nPress Y if yes, N if no");  
    printf("\n?\n");  
    scanf("%c", &choice);  

    if(choice=='Y')         
    {  
        for(i=0;i<10;i++)  
        {  
            fwrite(&temp, sizeof(temp), 10, fpData);  
        }           
    }  
}  

fclose(fpData);
share|improve this question
    
You seem to be missing some code ... 1) you only allocate a single instance of Person, i.e., the variable temp on the stack -- shouldn't there be an array or some type of memory pointer to an array of Person structures on the heap that you save each read from the file into? 2) Where's the allocation of buf, and what is the definition of BUFFER_SIZE? 3) I'm assuming all your debug information prints out correctly (i.e., you are actually tokenizing the file correctly)? –  Jason Apr 1 '11 at 4:00
    
yes. tokenizing is populating the struct correctly with 10 entries from CSV file.But when I write it to a file, it only writes the last entry with some special characters. –  Amisha Apr 1 '11 at 4:26
    
Note that RFC 4180 provides a definition for CVS that is more complex than your tokenizer will handle. That's not a disaster if the input is guaranteed to be in the simple form your code expects, but may be a problem if you will be receiving data from a RFC 4180 compliant source. See this recent question. –  dmckee Apr 1 '11 at 21:32

2 Answers 2

You're not allocating any memory for the array of structures you're trying to copy into your output file, as well as the character array members in your structure. Simply copying the pointer returned from strtok() will not work as that is pointing to a static character array inside the strtok() function. So basically after a single pass through your while-loop, both temp.AccountName and temp.LastPaymentDate are pointing to the same exact memory location. Furthermore as chemuduguntar pointed out above, when you write-out the structure, you're only writing out the memory pointers ... there is no actual string data in your structure for what you're assuming are character arrays.

You have two choices ... either declare your structure with static storage to store the string arrays and then use strcpy() to copy the data from strtok() into those arrays, or use malloc() and allocate memory for your pointers (just remember you'll have to free those pointers later unless you want memory leaks).

So for instance, you could do something like this:

#define MAXBUFSIZE 511

typedef struct  
{
    int AccountNumber;  
    char AccountName[MAXBUFSIZE + 1];  
    double AccountBalance;  
    double LastPaymentAmount;  
    char LastPaymentDate[MAXBUFSIZE + 1];  
} Person;

Then inside your while-loop, when you call strtok() you can do this:

tok = strtok(NULL, ",");
strncopy(temp.AccountName, tok, MAXBUFSIZE);
temp.AccountName[MAXBUFSIZE] = '\0'; //safety NULL termination

//...more code

tok = strtok(NULL, ",");
strncopy(temp.LastPaymentDate, tok, MAXBUFSIZE);
temp.LastPaymentDate[MAXBUFSIZE] = '\0'; //safety NULL termination

Now with this approach there is actual data inside your structures that is not pointing to some temporary storage somewhere ... the only downside to this approach is that if you go over 512 bytes, then you'll clip that data. If you go under 512 bytes, then you will have all zeros padding out the end of the character arrays.

Next, somewhere you need to declare either:

Person myarray[10];

or

Person* myarray = calloc(10, sizeof(Person));

because right now every time you go through your while-loop, you're over-writing the previous value of temp. So at some point you need to copy your temp structure into more permanent storage array. For instance, at the end of your while-loop you should call:

memcpy(&myarray[LOOPNUMBER], &temp, sizeof(Person)); 

Finally, for the call to fwrite() I would change that slightly so it's something like:

for(i=0;i<10;i++)  
{  
    fwrite(myarray, sizeof(Person), 10, fpData);  
} 

And again, if you use pointers with malloc(), calloc(), etc., be sure to free that storage afterwards by a call to free().

Hope this helps,

Jason

share|improve this answer

I don't think this will quite work without defining a static array in your structure for storing strings, currently when you are writing the structure to disk - only the pointers are being written.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. But can you help me with writing the struct to a file? –  Amisha Apr 1 '11 at 5:15

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