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Below is a simple query where the union operator is first executed no matter what. The way mysql executes this query is just too bad.

mysql> explain select * from (select * from schema1.Application a union select * from schema2.Application b) c where c.SubmittedTime > now();
+----+--------------+------------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+--------+-------------+
| id | select_type  | table      | type | possible_keys | key  | key_len | ref  | rows   | Extra       |
+----+--------------+------------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+--------+-------------+
|  1 | PRIMARY      | <derived2> | ALL  | NULL          | NULL | NULL    | NULL | 559938 | Using where | 
|  2 | DERIVED      | a          | ALL  | NULL          | NULL | NULL    | NULL | 554541 |             | 
|  3 | UNION        | b          | ALL  | NULL          | NULL | NULL    | NULL | 554541 |             | 
| NULL | UNION RESULT | <union2,3> | ALL  | NULL          | NULL | NULL    | NULL |   NULL |             | 
+----+--------------+------------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+--------+-------------+
4 rows in set (1 min 1.57 sec)

The where clause in this case can be taken well inside each of the operands of union. And it is very much a natural way of doing also. As we all know

(a + b)/c = a/c + b/c

Is there any way to force mysql to execute the query in the most efficient way?

share|improve this question

In your example such optimisation is possible, but not in general case. MySQL usually uses plan for general case so you should write SQL in form a/c + b/c.

share|improve this answer
    
Union being a set operation, I don't really think what you have said above is true. In other words, if this is good for set theory, this should very much be good for relational DBMS. I really believe that optimization should be very much possible. But I am glad to know that this is not the case in mysql. – Ram Apr 4 '11 at 10:17

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