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I have a relatively big text file with blocks of data layered like this:

ANALYSIS OF X SIGNAL, CASE: 1
TUNE X =  0.2561890123390808

    Line Frequency      Amplitude             Phase             Error         mx  my  ms  p

1 0.2561890123391E+00 0.204316425208E-01 0.164145385871E+03 0.00000000000E+00   1   0   0   0
2 0.2562865535359E+00 0.288712798671E-01 -.161563284233E+03 0.97541196785E-04   1   0   0   0

(they contain more lines and then are repeated)

I would like first to extract the numerical value after TUNE X = and output these in a text file. Then I would like to extract the numerical value of LINE FREQUENCY and AMPLITUDE as a pair of values and output to a file.

My question is the following: altough I could make something moreorless working using a simple REGEXP I'm not convinced that it's the right way to do it and I would like some advices or examples of code showing how I can do that efficiently with Ruby.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Generally, (not tested)

toggle=0
File.open("file").each do |line|
    if line[/TUNE/]
        puts line.split("=",2)[-1].strip
    end
    if line[/Line Frequency/]
        toggle=1
        next
    end
    if toggle
        a = line.split
        puts "#{a[1]} #{a[2]}"
    end
end

go through the file line by line, check for /TUNE/, then split on "=" to get last item. Do the same for lines containing /Line Frequency/ and set the toggle flag to 1. This signify that the rest of line contains the data you want to get. Since the freq and amplitude are at fields 2 and 3, then split on the lines and get the respective positions. Generally, this is the idea. As for toggling, you might want to set toggle flag to 0 at the next block using a pattern (eg SIGNAL CASE or ANALYSIS)

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toggle is always true ? –  steenslag Apr 1 '11 at 8:33
    
no, its not always true. It will be reset when the pattern for next block is found. OR, there is no need to toggle at all, since there are no other special conditions for extraction. –  kurumi Apr 1 '11 at 8:37
    
OK, it modified it to use the toggle in other cases too, works fine. –  Cedric H. Apr 1 '11 at 8:54
file = File.open("data.dat")
@tune_x = @frequency = @amplitude = []
file.each_line do |line|
  tune_x_scan = line.scan /TUNE X =  (\d*\.\d*)/
  data_scan = line.scan /(\d*\.\d*E[-|+]\d*)/
  @tune_x << tune_x_scan[0] if tune_x_scan
  @frequency << data_scan[0] if data_scan
  @amplitude << data_scan[0] if data_scan
end
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There are lots of ways to do it. This is a simple first pass at it:

text = 'ANALYSIS OF X SIGNAL, CASE: 1
TUNE X =  0.2561890123390808

    Line Frequency      Amplitude             Phase             Error         mx  my  ms  p

1 0.2561890123391E+00 0.204316425208E-01 0.164145385871E+03 0.00000000000E+00   1   0   0   0
2 0.2562865535359E+00 0.288712798671E-01 -.161563284233E+03 0.97541196785E-04   1   0   0   0

ANALYSIS OF X SIGNAL, CASE: 1
TUNE X =  1.2561890123390808

    Line Frequency      Amplitude             Phase             Error         mx  my  ms  p

1 1.2561890123391E+00 0.204316425208E-01 0.164145385871E+03 0.00000000000E+00   1   0   0   0
2 1.2562865535359E+00 0.288712798671E-01 -.161563284233E+03 0.97541196785E-04   1   0   0   0

ANALYSIS OF X SIGNAL, CASE: 1
TUNE X =  2.2561890123390808

    Line Frequency      Amplitude             Phase             Error         mx  my  ms  p

1 2.2561890123391E+00 0.204316425208E-01 0.164145385871E+03 0.00000000000E+00   1   0   0   0
2 2.2562865535359E+00 0.288712798671E-01 -.161563284233E+03 0.97541196785E-04   1   0   0   0
'

require 'stringio'
pretend_file = StringIO.new(text, 'r')

That gives us a StringIO object we can pretend is a file. We can read from it by lines.

I changed the numbers a bit just to make it easier to see that they are being captured in the output.

pretend_file.each_line do |li|
  case

  when li =~ /^TUNE.+?=\s+(.+)/
    print $1.strip, "\n"

  when li =~ /^\d+\s+(\S+)\s+(\S+)/
    print $1, ' ', $2, "\n"

  end
end

For real use you'd want to change the print statements to a file handle: fileh.print

The output looks like:

# >> 0.2561890123390808
# >> 0.2561890123391E+00 0.204316425208E-01
# >> 0.2562865535359E+00 0.288712798671E-01
# >> 1.2561890123390808
# >> 1.2561890123391E+00 0.204316425208E-01
# >> 1.2562865535359E+00 0.288712798671E-01
# >> 2.2561890123390808
# >> 2.2561890123391E+00 0.204316425208E-01
# >> 2.2562865535359E+00 0.288712798671E-01
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Thanks, it works ! –  Cedric H. Apr 1 '11 at 8:55

You can read your file line by line and cut each by number of symbol, for example:

  • to extract tune x get symbols from 10 till 27 on line 2
  • to extract LINE FREQUENCY get symbols from 3 till 22 on line 6+n
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