Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Could you point me to an effective algorithm for rendering and filling the curves used in TTF fonts? I have the data loaded as contours of points so I;m only wondering about an effective way of drawing the curves. I'd also very much like it to support smoothing.

What I know up to this point:

  1. TTF uses bezier curves and splines
  2. TTF categorizes it's points as points defining lines, and points defining curve, the latter being either on the curve in question or our of it (control points)
  3. One can make a polygon out of a curve contour where the curved parts are made of lines the size of a pixel.
  4. One could use this polygon to render the filled contour and if one also uses the data as floats rather than ints, one could achieve font smoothing.

So could you point me to a guide of some sort or something?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Hi Albus, sorry for being late to the party but what did you use eventually to solve this? – Nicholas Kyriakides Feb 3 '14 at 14:12
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you already have the vector data, then you have to rasterize it with some scanline fill algorithm. For smoothing divide the pixels into n by n blocks, rasterize the characters and compute the a gray value corresponding to the number of filled subpixels. Handling bezier curves and splines, however, is not going to be easy, I think. If it is possible, I would use a library like freetype or similar.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! You put it so well, that I'm now positively sure what I should do! Thanks a lot! – Albus Dumbledore Apr 1 '11 at 14:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.