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I have a data frame with 3 variables, which are all wind speeds. I want to check how well the hardware was calibrated by plotting all the variables against each other. Although there are three in this instance, it may be that there are up to 6.

This would result in 3 different graphs, where the x and y parameters keep changing. I'd really like to plot these using facets- or something with the same appearance.

Here is some sample data, in a data frame called wind:

wind <- structure(list(speed_60e = c(3.029, 3.158, 2.881, 2.305, 2.45, 
2.358, 2.325, 2.723, 2.567, 1.972, 2.044, 1.745, 2.1, 2.08, 1.914, 
2.44, 2.356, 1.564, 1.942, 1.413, 1.756, 1.513, 1.263, 1.301, 
1.403, 1.496, 1.828, 1.8, 1.841, 2.014), speed_60w = c(2.981, 
3.089, 2.848, 2.265, 2.406, 2.304, 2.286, 2.686, 2.511, 1.946, 
2.004, 1.724, 2.079, 2.058, 1.877, 2.434, 2.375, 1.562, 1.963, 
1.436, 1.743, 1.541, 1.256, 1.312, 1.402, 1.522, 1.867, 1.837, 
1.873, 2.055), speed_40 = c(2.726, 2.724, 2.429, 2.028, 1.799, 
1.863, 1.987, 2.445, 2.282, 1.938, 1.721, 1.466, 1.841, 1.919, 
1.63, 2.373, 2.22, 1.576, 1.693, 1.185, 1.274, 1.421, 1.071, 
1.163, 1.166, 1.504, 1.77, 1.778, 1.632, 1.545)), .Names = c("speed_60e", 
"speed_60w", "speed_40"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c("1", 
"2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9", "10", "11", "12", "13", 
"14", "15", "16", "17", "18", "19", "20", "21", "22", "23", "24", 
"25", "26", "27", "28", "29", "30"))

R> head(wind)
  speed_60e speed_60w speed_40
1     3.029     2.981    2.726
2     3.158     3.089    2.724
3     2.881     2.848    2.429
4     2.305     2.265    2.028
5     2.450     2.406    1.799
6     2.358     2.304    1.863

I wish to plot three square graphs. An individual one can be plotted by calling

ggplot() + geom_point(data=wind, aes(wind[,1],wind[,3]), alpha=I(1/30), 
                      shape=I(20), size=I(1))

Any idea how I can do this?

share|improve this question
    
+1 For a very clear question and using the results of dput() to share your data –  Andrie Apr 1 '11 at 12:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Will something like this do?

plotmatrix(data = wind) + geom_smooth(method="lm")

Which gives:

pairs plotting in ggplot

Hadley calls this a "Crude experimental scatterplot matrix", but it might suffice for your needs?

Edit: Currently, plotmatrix() isn't quite flexible enough to handle all of @Chris' requirements regarding specification of the geom_point() layer. However, we can cut the guts out of plotmatrix() as use Hadley's nice code to create the data structure needed for plotting, but plot it however we like using standard ggplot() calls. This function also drops the densities but you can look into the code for plotmatrix() to see how to get them.

First, a function that expands the data from the wide format to the repeated format required for a pairs plot where we plot each variables against every other, but not itself.

Expand <- function(data) {
    grid <- expand.grid(x = 1:ncol(data), y = 1:ncol(data))
    grid <- subset(grid, x != y)
    all <- do.call("rbind", lapply(1:nrow(grid), function(i) {
        xcol <- grid[i, "x"]
        ycol <- grid[i, "y"]
        data.frame(xvar = names(data)[ycol], yvar = names(data)[xcol], 
                   x = data[, xcol], y = data[, ycol], data)
    }))
    all$xvar <- factor(all$xvar, levels = names(data))
    all$yvar <- factor(all$yvar, levels = names(data))
    all
}

Note: all this does is steal Hadley's code from plotmatrix() - I have done nothing fancy here.

Expand the data:

wind2 <- Expand(wind)

Now we can plot this as any other long-format data object required by ggplot():

ggplot(wind2, aes(x = x, y = y)) + 
    geom_point(alpha = I(1/10), shape = I(20), size = I(1)) + 
    facet_grid(xvar ~ yvar, scales = "free")

If you want the densities, then we can pull out that bit of code two into a helper function:

makeDensities <- function(data) {
    densities <- do.call("rbind", lapply(1:ncol(data), function(i) {
        data.frame(xvar = names(data)[i], yvar = names(data)[i], 
                   x = data[, i])
    }))
    densities
}

Then compute the densities for the original data:

dens <- makeDensities(wind)

and then add then using the same bit of code from plotmatrix():

ggplot(wind2, aes(x = x, y = y)) + 
       geom_point(alpha = I(1/10), shape = I(20), size = I(1)) + 
       facet_grid(xvar ~ yvar, scales = "free")+
       stat_density(aes(x = x, y = ..scaled.. * diff(range(x)) + min(x)),
                    data = dens, position = "identity", colour = "grey20", 
                    geom = "line")

A complete version of the original figure I showed above but using the extracted code would be:

ggplot(wind2, aes(x = x, y = y)) + 
       geom_point(alpha = I(1/10), shape = I(20), size = I(1)) + 
       facet_grid(xvar ~ yvar, scales = "free")+
       stat_density(aes(x = x, y = ..scaled.. * diff(range(x)) + min(x)),
                    data = dens, position = "identity", colour = "grey20", 
                    geom = "line") +
       geom_smooth(method="lm")

giving:

custom version of the pairs plot

share|improve this answer
    
+1 For telling me about plotmatrix() –  Andrie Apr 1 '11 at 10:41
    
If I could up-vote further, I would have. This amount of work deserves some extra points. Next best thing: I'll contact you separately and buy you a beer next time I am in London. –  Andrie Apr 1 '11 at 11:27
    
I wish I could upvote this forever. –  Erik Shilts Feb 14 '12 at 18:51

ggpairs from the GGally package is quite nice for quick comparison of each variable in a dataframe:

ggpairs(wind)

GGally default plot with wind data

It will also handle comparisons of numeric and factor data.

share|improve this answer

Melt the data first (convert it to long form).

mwind <- melt(wind)
ggplot(mwind, aes(value)) + geom_histogram() + facet_wrap(~ variable)

If you want to plot points, you need to add an index variable for the x axis.

share|improve this answer
    
This was also useful for me- I had tried to melt the data but wasn't sure what to use as an id, so thanks. –  Chris Apr 1 '11 at 12:55
    
@Chris part of the problem is that this is a non-standard melt. You are in effect needing to duplicate/replicate the data in the long format to allow for plotting of one variable against the others. A simple melt won't work - hence the efforts Hadley went to in the code in plotmatrix(). If a melt would have worked, he'd have used that instead. –  Gavin Simpson Apr 2 '11 at 1:33

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