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I am confuse on how to read the pointers copied in an array using memcpy. Following is what I have tried, but does not work.

Basically, I have allocated block of memory in which I am copying pointers similar to array fashion, but during retrial it is not working. While this works with basic data types properly

I want to store anything in the element block, It can be either integers or pointers.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

#define INDEX(x)  ((char *)elements + (sizeof(int*) * (x)))
int size = 10;

void f2_int_ptr() {    
    int i = 0;
    void *elements = (void*)malloc(size * sizeof(int*));
    for ( i = 0; i < size; i++ ) { 
       int *v = ( int *) malloc ( sizeof(int));
       memcpy ( v, &i, sizeof ( int ));


       memcpy ( INDEX(i) , v,  sizeof (int*));
    }
    for ( i = 0; i < size; i++ ) { 
        int *v = (int*)0;
        memcpy ( v, INDEX(i), sizeof(int *));
        printf ( "%d\n", *v );
    }
}
void f1_int() {
    int i = 0;
    void *elements = (void*)malloc(size * sizeof(int));
    for ( i = 0; i < size; i++ ) { 
       memcpy ( INDEX(i) , &i,  sizeof (int));
    }
    for ( i = 0; i < size; i++ ) { 
        int v;
        memcpy ( &v, INDEX(i), sizeof ( int ));
        printf ( "%d\n", v );
    }
}
int main(){
    f1_int();
    f2_int_ptr();
    return 0;
}

In the above code f1_int works fine but f2_int_ptr does not work.

share|improve this question
    
Note: All this typecasting to and from void * (and the macro) is not making your code pretty nasty. Is there any reason you're using void * everywhere? –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 1 '11 at 10:43
    
This works for all basic types, but not working only for pointers. –  Avinash Apr 1 '11 at 10:44
    
You should try to clarify your code if you intend it to be read. C being a hoax (gnu.org/fun/jokes/unix-hoax.html) is not an argument to code that way. –  mouviciel Apr 1 '11 at 10:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

f2_int_ptr() needs to become this:

void f2_int_ptr() {
    int i = 0;
    void *elements = malloc(size * sizeof(int*));

    for ( i = 0; i < size; i++ ) { 
       int *v = malloc ( sizeof(int));
       memcpy ( v, &i, sizeof ( int ));
       memcpy ( INDEX(i) , &v,  sizeof (int*));
    }

    for ( i = 0; i < size; i++ ) {
        int *v;
        memcpy ( &v, INDEX(i), sizeof(int *));
        printf ( "%d\n", *v );
    }
}

Note the subtle changes to the memcpy() arguments.

Note: I really, really, really, wouldn't write code like this! It's incredibly difficult to follow.

share|improve this answer
    
Added more to question. –  Avinash Apr 1 '11 at 10:50
    
If i use pointer-to-pointer then I have to make sure always that elements going into the block is always allocated, I cannot have elements from the stack. –  Avinash Apr 1 '11 at 10:56
    
@Avniash: There are no stack elements in my code above. –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 1 '11 at 10:57
    
ok may be i am confusing everyone, let me edit the question. –  Avinash Apr 1 '11 at 11:00
    
@Avinash: Ok, see my updated answer. –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 1 '11 at 11:32

Code is very ugly, so I dont even know how it should works but: Why are u using &v here:

memcpy ( &v, INDEX(i), sizeof ( int ));

v is pointer itself:

int *v = (int*)0;
share|improve this answer
    
It dumps without that. I wanted to read from the array, I am not sure how to do that and array has pointer copied. –  Avinash Apr 1 '11 at 10:48

thanks Guys, it worked finally. i guess i have not allocated the space where to copy memcpy.

void f2_int_ptr() {    
    int i = 0;
    void *elements = (void*)malloc(size * sizeof(int*));
    for ( i = 0; i < size; i++ ) { 
       int *v = ( int *) malloc ( sizeof(int));
       memcpy ( v, &i, sizeof ( int ));

       memcpy ( INDEX(i) , v,  sizeof (int*));
    }
    for ( i = 0; i < size; i++ ) { 
        int *v = ( int *) malloc (sizeof(int*));
        memcpy ( v, INDEX(i), sizeof(int*));
        printf ( "%d\n", *v );
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This code will not work; you have a memory leak. –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 1 '11 at 11:41
    
Why this will not work, –  Avinash Apr 1 '11 at 11:50
    
because you have a memory leak. You are not freeing v in the first or second loop. Also, you are storing int values in elements, not int *. See my answer. –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 1 '11 at 11:56

If you are storing the pointers in the elemnts, I think the final memcpy needs to use &v to copy the element to the pointer v. Similar to v=elements[i].

void f2_int_ptr() {    
    int i = 0;
    void *elements = (void*)malloc(size * sizeof(int*));
    for ( i = 0; i < size; i++ ) { 
       int *v = ( int *) malloc ( sizeof(int));
       memcpy ( v, &i, sizeof ( int *));


       memcpy ( INDEX(i) , &v,  sizeof (int*));
    }
    for ( i = 0; i < size; i++ ) { 
        int *v = (int *)0;
        memcpy ( &v, INDEX(i), sizeof(int *));
        printf ( "%d\n", *v );
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This core dumps. –  Avinash Apr 1 '11 at 11:12
    
Ok. With the edit I think I see what you are trying to do, (Copy the pointer into elements.) so I've updated. –  sickgemini Apr 1 '11 at 11:40
    
This will also dump, I guess I need to allocate the v before getting element back. –  Avinash Apr 1 '11 at 11:55
    
Would't have thought you needed to as you already have the original alloc. –  sickgemini Apr 1 '11 at 12:07

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