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At the moment I have the following structure of my application:

  • A folder named ViewModels
  • A folder called Views
  • A folder called Services

The ViewModel has a class, called ItemTypeDetailViewModel. How it looks:

public class ItemTypeDetailViewModel
{
    private IItemTypenService itemTypeService;
    public ObservableCollection<Models.ItemType> ItemTypes { get; set; }
    public ICollectionView CollectionView { get; set; }

    public ItemTypeDetailViewModel()
    {
        itemTypeService = new ItemTypeService();
        itemTypeService.GetItemTypes();

        CollectionView = CollectionViewSource.GetDefaultView(ItemTypes);
    }
}

In the class I have a reference to the Service Layer (for now no DI, just newing in the constructor). With the help of the itemTypeService I will get a collection of ItemTypes. This is maybe a more MVP kind of structuring?

But now I start to get confused because most of the examples I see of MVVM have the model wrapped in a ViewModel.

What is a good approach here?

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2  
The View should bind to a ViewModel. The ViewModel cannot know anything about potential views. You might write a new view to work with an existing ViewModel - or you might write unit tests for your ViewModel and so a view referred to in the ViewModel is inappropriate. –  Kieren Johnstone Apr 1 '11 at 11:39
    
Further to that, I'd put your ViewModels in a separate project/assembly that does not reference anything UI or view-y, to enforce this. It works well :) –  Kieren Johnstone Apr 1 '11 at 11:50
    
The View is not in anyway available in my ViewModel. Maybe you got confused with ICollectionView CollectionView? That is the view for a collection, not the GUI view. –  Garth Marenghi Apr 1 '11 at 11:52
    
Sorry, correct, you have a class ending ViewModel that returns a class ending View. Is that a collection of ViewModels? Perhaps you could make it generic (ICollectionView<*ViewModel>). Finally you're exposing the underlying model publicly with ItemTypes - I personally think it's much better to keep the object graph entirely full of ViewModels only, or basic value types. –  Kieren Johnstone Apr 1 '11 at 11:58
    
No, it is a view of the collectiontype, which makes me use things like filtering, grouping, paging etc. on the items in the collection. And as far as I see, it is generic. I don't think I catch what you want to say in the last sentence though... –  Garth Marenghi Apr 1 '11 at 12:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

But now I start to get confused because most of the examples I see of MVVM have the model wrapped in a ViewModel.

What is a good approach here?

If each of your data items (a Model) is trivial, and the way you are using them in the View is also trivial, then there's no problem at all with exposing them "as is" from the ViewModel (creating extra work just because is never a good idea). On the other hand, if you find you need functionality that is not extremely easy to achieve it might be an indication that you need to wrap each Model in its own ViewModel (an ItemTypeViewModel).

An example of when you may not need a ViewModel is displaying the items in a read-only list, in which case you will be good to go with a DataTemplate and nothing more. The counter-example would be if you need to edit them and the edits need to be validated; the ViewModel will then hold the validation logic.

To sum it up: don't go berserk with MVVM if there's no reason to. Be practical.

A final note regarding the ViewModel having access to the View:

There is no problem in doing that as long as you do not use public interface of the view's runtime type. In fact, ViewModel-first MVVM requires that the ViewModel have a reference to the View. Many people will tell you that this is an automatic mistake -- they are wrong, and probably influenced by the fact that View-first (which is the MVVM flavor found in most examples) doesn't have the ViewModel reference the View.

If it is OK for the View to have a reference to the ViewModel as its DataContext, then it's also OK for the converse to happen. The important point is how that reference is used: public object View { get; set; } is certainly fine because it does not introduce any coupling; but public MyUserControl View { get; set; } is not, because it couples the ViewModel to the specific type MyUserControl.

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I may be being naive, but why would you give up decoupling View and ViewModels over keeping the Model and ViewModel decoupled? I.e. being able to unit-test the ViewModel vs.. well, what's the advantage? Being able to test the View+ViewModel together without the model being present? –  Kieren Johnstone Apr 1 '11 at 12:17
    
@KierenJohnstone: Please explain what you mean "give up decoupling". Is the last paragraph unclear? As for the assertion that you don't necessarily need a ViewModel, the reasoning is that you don't wrap ViewModels around everything just because you can. Don't you agree with the "read-only POCO" example? –  Jon Apr 1 '11 at 12:19
    
So, if I'm right, there can actually be _two_ ViewModels? One is a ViewModel of the Model, and a ViewModel of the View. Either the ViewModel of the View has the actual Model, or the ViewModel of the View has the ViewModel of the Model –  Garth Marenghi Apr 1 '11 at 12:28
1  
@Asad: They can be forwarded to other services. For example, a viewmodel might expose a "close" command that should result in its view(s) being removed from the UI. The vm cannot and should not know how to do that, but frameworks that provide infrastructure for view composition do. So you pass the view to the framework and ask it to remove it from the UI; in general the vm itself knows what logical steps need to be taken for a particular action, but not necessarily how to take all of them. –  Jon Apr 11 at 9:27
1  
There might be a method of the control that "closes" it, or there might not be (e.g. a TabItem is removed by doing something to its parent, not to itself). But in any case the philosophy of MVVM is that you should not be directly interacting with the view. –  Jon Apr 11 at 11:08

(First part from my comment above: The View should bind to a ViewModel. The ViewModel cannot know anything about potential views. You might write a new view to work with an existing ViewModel - or you might write unit tests for your ViewModel and so a view referred to in the ViewModel is inappropriate.)

I'm not sure exactly what you're trying to do but this looks like the detail view for an ItemType. I can't see why then you'd have ALL item types queried within the constructor?

I would do something like this:

  • Create an ItemTypesViewModel, which has a collection of ItemTypeDetailViewModel, lazy-loaded
  • Create a repository somewhere that the ViewModels use to query the model (data) (e.g. the IItemTypeService does this I imagine)

A quick example, without the lazy-loading:

    public class ItemTypesViewModel : ViewModelBase
    {
        private List<ItemTypeDetailViewModel> itemTypeViewModels;

        public IEnumerable<ItemTypeDetailViewModel> ItemTypes
        {
            get
            {
                return itemTypeViewModels;
            }
        }

        public ItemTypesViewModel(IItemTypeService service)
        {
            // populate itemTypeViewModels using service here
        }
    }

Update, more relevant I think/hope: What I usually do in terms of accessing the service layer is have a static member in the ViewModel class that acts as a factory memory. Example:

public class ItemTypesViewModel : ViewModelBase
{
    public static ItemTypesViewModel Create(IItemTypeService service)
    {
        // build and return object here
    }
}

At some point you've got to cross the boundaries, and this method is to my personal taste.. would be interested to see what others do. Perhaps an additional layer or set of factories for ViewModels. ?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, the IItemsTypeService is the repository. the model (for now) consists of a class called ItemType. –  Garth Marenghi Apr 1 '11 at 11:57
    
Thanks for your help! –  Garth Marenghi Apr 1 '11 at 14:12

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