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Problem Statement:

Given base and n that are both 1 or more, compute the value of base to the n power, so powerN(3, 2) is 9 (3 squared).

Example

powerN(3, 1) → 3
powerN(3, 2) → 9
powerN(3, 3) → 27

The function signature is public int powerN(int base, int n)

I'm finding it to difficult to solve this? Help me out.
EDIT: I need a solution which does not uses built in mathematical formulas and recursion

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closed as not a real question by Jeff Atwood Apr 9 '11 at 4:08

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
If it's homework, please tag it as such. – MByD Apr 1 '11 at 11:48
3  
Have you tried Math.pow(base, n)? For homework, you have to solve a problem a given way, in the real world, you usually just want the simplest/best. This is why you should tag [homework] as such. – Peter Lawrey Apr 1 '11 at 11:49
    
i should not use built in expressions,No its not homework... – Deepak Apr 1 '11 at 11:50
1  
i should not use built in expressions why? – Peter Lawrey Apr 1 '11 at 11:51
1  
Is it just me or does this sound as a thoroughly counterproductive question to ask at an interview? – biziclop Apr 1 '11 at 11:57
up vote 6 down vote accepted
public int powerN(int base, int n) {
    int result = 1;
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        result *= base;
    }

    return result;
}
share|improve this answer

The most popular method of doing this is like this:

sum = base
while (power > 1)
    if (power is even)
        sum = sum * sum
        power = power / 2
    else
        sum = sum * base
        power = power - 1
return sum

You can convert to Java, I just wanted to give you the general idea.

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1  
for even better performance I'd use power >>= 1 instead of power = power / 2 :) – Thomas Apr 1 '11 at 12:06
    
@Thomas It's pseudocode. When translating into another language, use whatever works best. Besides, the optimizer should be able to figure that out :-P – Jonathan Apr 1 '11 at 12:07
    
@Thomas: i have done bit shifiting , thats the fastest way. – Dead Programmer Apr 1 '11 at 12:24
    
Even in pseudocode? :-P – Jonathan Apr 1 '11 at 12:27
    
Especially in pseudocode! :D :D :D – Thomas Apr 1 '11 at 12:38

You can use recursion:

public int powerN(int base, int n)
{
    if (n == 0) {
       return 1;
    } else {
       return (powerN(base, n-1) * base);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
without recursion...not even recursion – Deepak Apr 1 '11 at 11:53
4  
@Deepak: Then that should have been stated in your question. – Evan Mulawski Apr 1 '11 at 11:54
    
Sorry edited the original question – Deepak Apr 1 '11 at 11:55
    
+1 for the only recursion answer. – MByD Apr 1 '11 at 11:56

assuming your power stays under int limit

int out = 1;
for(int i=n; i>0; i--)
   out = out*base;
return out;
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Fast way the-most-efficient-way-to-implement-an-integer-based-power-function-powint-int from Elias Yarrkov

Exponentiation by squaring.

 public static long powerN(long base, long n)
 {
   long result = 1;
    while (n > 0)
    {
        if ((n & 1) == 1)
            result *= base;
        n >>= 1;
        base *= base;
    }

    return result;
 }
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public int powerN(int base, int n) {
   return Double.intValue(Math.pow ( base, n));
}

Ok I saw you can't use built in functions:

public int powerN(int base, int n) {
    if (n == 0) {
        return 1;
    } else {
        int result = 1;
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            result = result * base;
        }

        return result;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
i should not use built in expressions: OP – Nishant Apr 1 '11 at 11:52
    
Yes I saw it.... in the comments – anon Apr 1 '11 at 11:53

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