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I need to specialize template member function for some type (let's say double). It works fine while class X itself is not a template class, but when I make it template GCC starts giving compile-time errors.

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>

template <class C> class X
{
public:
   template <class T> void get_as();
};

template <class C>
void X<C>::get_as<double>()
{

}

int main()
{
   X<int> x;
   x.get_as();
}

here is the error message

source.cpp:11:27: error: template-id
  'get_as<double>' in declaration of primary template
source.cpp:11:6: error: prototype for
  'void X<C>::get_as()' does not match any in class 'X<C>'
source.cpp:7:35: error: candidate is:
  template<class C> template<class T> void X::get_as()

How can I fix that and what is the problem here?

Thanks in advance.

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2  
this is illegal in the current standard, to specialize, you have to specialize the class as well... –  Nim Apr 1 '11 at 11:55
    
but it works if the class is not template. Is it illegal too? –  ledokol Apr 1 '11 at 11:58
    
nope, that is perfectly fine, it's only for class templates that this rule applies (AFAIK). –  Nim Apr 1 '11 at 12:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 35 down vote accepted

It doesn't work that way. You would need to say the following, but it is not correct

template <class C> template<>
void X<C>::get_as<double>()
{

}

Explicitly specialized members need their surrounding class templates to be explicitly specialized as well. So you need to say the following, which would only specialize the member for X<int>.

template <> template<>
void X<int>::get_as<double>()
{

}

If you want to keep the surrounding template unspecialized, you have several choices. I prefer overloads

template <class C> class X
{
   template<typename T> struct type { };

public:
   template <class T> void get_as() {
     get_as(type<T>());
   }

private:
   template<typename T> void get_as(type<T>) {

   }

   void get_as(type<double>) {

   }
};
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why do you need the type<> wrapper? couldn't a cast of a 0 to a pointer of type T do the trick? I guess it's not as elegant... –  Nim Apr 1 '11 at 12:08
    
Looks like this is really not possible to do. Thanks. –  ledokol Apr 1 '11 at 12:09
1  
@Nim right, I think the pointer cast thing is ugly, and wouldn't work for types you can't form pointers to (references). Also, having a function parameter be a pointer to an array type without a size is illegal in C++. Having it in a type wrapper makes it work for all types. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 1 '11 at 12:09
    
oops, forgot about references... this approach is definitely more elegant.. –  Nim Apr 1 '11 at 12:10
1  
@JohannesSchaub-litb : What are the other choices along overloads ? Can show some of them ? –  JB Jansen Feb 18 at 22:12

First of all: you don't have get_as specialization declared in your class template to be defined later in a code. So first you need to do this:

template <class C> class X
{
public:
   template <class T> void get_as();
   template <> void get_as<double>();
};

Then define specialization:

template <class C>
template <>
void X<C>::get_as<double>()
{
....
}

But I would define it like this:

template <class C> class X
{
public:
   template <class T> void get_as()
   {
   // default implementation
   }

   template <> void get_as<double>()
   {
   // specialized implementation
   }
};

SORRY THE ABOVE DOESN'T WORK!

EDIT:

It turns out that function template specializations are not allowed in non-namespace scope, i.e. in classes, class templates, etc.

So you can make is as namespace-scope function template:

template <class C> class X
{
public:
}

template <class T, class C> void get_as( X<C>& obj )
{
// default implementation
}

template <class C> void get_as<double,C>( X<C>& obj )
{
// specialized implementation
}
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