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I'm trying to control a grid connected photovoltaic system based on the grid voltage. The idea is this: when the grid voltage rises above VMax, I want to switch off the system for timeOff. When timeOff has passed, i want to switch on again, but only when the grid voltage is lower than VMax.

I currently have two implementations; both are creating many events and i wonder if there's a more efficient way. This is how it is implemented now:

package Foo
model PVControl1 "Generating most events"

parameter Real VMax=253;
parameter Real timeOff=60;

input Real P_init "uncontrolled power";
input Real VGrid;
Real P_final "controlled power";
Boolean switch (start = true) "if true, system is producing";
discrete Real restartTime (start=-1, fixed=true) 
  "system is off until time>restartTime";

equation
when {VGrid > VMax, time > pre(restartTime)} then
  if VGrid > VMax then
    switch = false;
    restartTime = time + timeOff;
  else
    switch = true;
    restartTime = -1;
  end if;
end when;

if pre(switch) then
  P_final = P_init;
else
  P_final = 0;
end if;
end PVControl1;

model PVControl2;
  "Generating less events, but off-time is no multiple of timeOff"

parameter Real VMax=253;
parameter Real timeOff=60;

input Real P_init "uncontrolled power";
input Real VGrid;
Real P_final "controlled power";
discrete Real stopTime( start=-1-timeOff, fixed=true) 
  "system is off until time > stopTime + timeOff";

equation 
when VGrid > VMax then
  stopTime=time;
end when;

if noEvent(VGrid > VMax) or noEvent(time < stopTime + timeOff) then
  P_final = 0;
else
  P_final = P_init;
end if;
end PVControl2;

model TestPVControl;
  "Simulate 1000s to get an idea"

PVControl pvControl2(P_init=4000, VGrid = 300*sin(time/100));
end TestPVControl;

end foo;

When run, I get 8 events with PVControl1, and 4 events with PVControl2. Looking at PVControl2, I actually need only an event at the moment where VGrid becomes larger than VMax. This would give only 2 events. The other 2 events are generated when VGrid drops below VMax again.

Is there a way to improve my model further?
Thanks, Roel

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I have a few comments. I think you are viewing an event as when the equations within a when clause are activated. But that isn't quite right. An event occurs when the value of a discrete variable changes. The point is that the continuous integrator must be stopped at that point and the equations integrated with the new value.

To understand how that is affecting you in this case, you should consider that an anonymous expression (like the one in your when clauses) is probably being treated as an anonymous discrete variable. In other words, you can think of it as being equivalent to this:

Boolean c1 = VGrid > VMax;

when c1 then
  ...
end when;

...and the important thing to note is that an event (i.e. a change in the value of c1) occurs both when VGrid becomes greater than VMax and when it becomes less than VMax. Now consider this:

Boolean c1 = VGrid > VMax;
Boolean c2 = time > pre(restartTime);

when {c1, c2} then
  ...
end when;

Now you've got even more events because there are two conditions involved and you generate events each time either one of them changes value.

All that having been said, are you actually having a performance issue here? Normally, such events only become an issue when you have "chattering" (cases where the value of the condition changes sign due to numerical noise in the integration process). Do you have any numbers to indicate how much of an issue these events really are? It might also help to know what tool you are using to simulate these things.

Finally, one thing I don't understand from your logic is what happens if VGrid>VMax and then, after timeOff, VGrid is still greater than VMax?

Assuming it handles this last case correctly, I think PVControl2 is actually what you want (and generates exactly the number of events I would expect and for the reasons I would expect).

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Michael, thank you for your answer. To clarify a bit: I'm using dymola 7.4 FOD1. And yes, the events are a problem. I'm having a rather big model with 33 PV systems connected to the grid (each systems sees a different VGrid). When I activate the PVControl1, the model slows down drastically (factor 3) and I have 35k events over 1 year. Unfortunately, when I try PVControl2, dymola crashes at translation or compilation. I'm in contact with dymola support for this issue. Actually, the main question remains: is there a way to shut down my PV system without generating an event? –  saroele Apr 5 '11 at 10:40
    
I could of course shut it down like this: P_final = if noEvent(VGrid > VMax) then 0 else P_init; I will have no event, but the model becomes unstable or even unsolvable as the solver does not know whether to turn it on or off (switching it off will decrease VGrid again below VMax). –  saroele Apr 5 '11 at 10:50
2  
The only thing I can think of is to look at your integration parameters and/or tolerances. You've got a very long running simulation (1 year) with pretty fast dynamics (switching periods of 60 seconds?). It may be that the integrator is wasting a lot of effort on trying to take really large timesteps and failing because of events truncating them. Although normally a fixed timestep integrator is the last thing I recommend, it might make sense in your case (at least worth trying). Other than that, try different integration algorithms and different tolerances to see if that helps. –  Michael Tiller Apr 8 '11 at 14:55

Probably my answer is 1/2 a year too late, but in this case there seems to be a chance that the system is not stiff, and in that case an explicit integrator (like the CERK ones in Dymola) will make your simulation run time much faster.

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It's never too late to learn... I'm still working on the same type of models, so I'll check out this solver. I'm afraid the system is stiff however, but maybe it will work. Thanks for your answer and welcome to stackoverflow :-) –  saroele Sep 6 '11 at 6:30

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