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#include <iostream>

template<class T> T CreateArray(T a, int n)
{
    a = new T [n]; // mistake: double* = double**
    return a;
}

int main()
{
    double* a;
    int n = 5;
    a = CreateArray(a,n);
    return 0;
}

can I allocate memory using a template and new? And what my mistake?

share|improve this question
    
What problems do you face? –  sharptooth Apr 1 '11 at 12:48
    
Why do you want to create an array on your own, when std::vector will do that for you? –  Bo Persson Apr 1 '11 at 17:16
    
I want to create an array of n * n * n. And all of this as a special case. –  ObiSan Apr 2 '11 at 0:24
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your code has some wrong things. First, you can do something like what you're trying to do, but you should write something like this:

template<class T> T* CreateArray(int n)
{
    T* a = new T [n];
    return a;
}

int main()
{
    double* a;
    int n = 5;
    a = CreateArray<double>(n);
    return 0;
}

Note that you don't have to pass the a array (it will be copied inside CreateArray, and its changes won't be visible inside main). Note also that you define the template to returning a pointer T*, that is what main() a is expecting.

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You missed the CreateArray<double>(n). –  ybungalobill Apr 1 '11 at 13:02
    
Well, yes, fixed. I'm not sure if this will be needed in this case (the compiler can infer it), but I'll add it for completion. –  Diego Sevilla Apr 1 '11 at 13:03
2  
@Diego: The compiler DO NOT use the return type for template argument deduction. –  ybungalobill Apr 1 '11 at 13:04
    
Why a = CreateArray<double>(n); better than a = new double [n];? It is useless. If you check the pointer (or do something more), I understand why a template function is used for allocate an array. –  Naszta Apr 1 '11 at 13:07
1  
@ObiSan: new typename [size]; is universal. –  Naszta Apr 1 '11 at 13:11
show 1 more comment

So others have explained why your code doesn’t work and how it can be improved.

Now I’ll show how you can still get the following code to compile – and to work properly:

 double* a = CreateArray(5);
 int* b = CreateArray(7);

The problem, as already mentioned, is that C++ does not infer template arguments from return types alone.

You can circumvent this limitation by making the above function return a simple proxy object. The proxy object has a single operation: an (implicit) conversion to T*. This is where the actual allocation happens.

The CreateArray function is therefore very simple (and not a template):

CreateArrayProxy CreateArray(std::size_t num_elements) {
    return CreateArrayProxy(num_elements);
}

As for the proxy:

struct CreateArrayProxy {
    std::size_t num_elements;

    CreateArrayProxy(std::size_t num_elements) : num_elements(num_elements) { }

    template <typename T>
    operator T*() const {
        return new T[num_elements];
    }
};

Easy as π.

Now, should you use this code? No, probably not. It offers no real advantage over direct allocation. But it’s a useful idiom to know.

share|improve this answer
    
ie better to dispense template when allocating memory? –  ObiSan Apr 1 '11 at 13:26
    
@ObiSan Not in general but the above code can be unexpected. But apart from that you should generally avoid allocating memory altogether. The strength of C++ is that you don’t have to worry about memory management most of the time. For arrays, the solution is simple: always use std::vector instead of dynamic memory. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 1 '11 at 13:34
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You want to accept a pointer to the type you want to allocate:

template<class T> T* CreateArray(T* a, int n)
{
    a = new T [n];
    return a;
}

This should do the trick.

share|improve this answer
    
template<class T> T* CreateArray(T* &a, int n) { a = new T [n]; return a; } - minor modification. –  Naszta Apr 1 '11 at 12:54
1  
@Naszta: who said he wants to modify the argument? –  ybungalobill Apr 1 '11 at 12:55
    
ybungalobill. He or she is clearly trying to modify a, but as he or she noticed, it does not work inside the method, so it returned it and assigned directly in main() This is why using references to pointers would be maybe better for he or she to understand. –  Diego Sevilla Apr 1 '11 at 12:57
    
@Naszta: Write your own answer if you have a different one. FYI, I think it's wrong. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 1 '11 at 13:00
4  
@Diego: Nah, changing a variable passed in by reference and returning it it just confusing. There is in fact nothing wrong with returning a new value. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 1 '11 at 13:01
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I prefer to keep empty pointers value NULL.

#include <iostream>

template<class T> bool CreateArray(T * &a, int n)
{
    if ( a != 0 )
      return false;
    a = new T [n];
    return true;
}

int main()
{
    double* a = 0;
    int n = 5;
    CreateArray(a,n);
    return 0;
}

vector could be a good solution, too. I think it is better one, because you won't make memory leak(s).

#include <vector>

int main()
{
    std::vector<double> a;
    int n = 5;
    a.resize(n);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
You may prefer that, but it's now an entirely different program with different semantics. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 1 '11 at 13:03
    
Interesting solution, but the compiler does the expression "T* &" and perceives as the multiplication of variables, doesn't? –  ObiSan Apr 1 '11 at 13:10
    
@ObiSan: MS compiler just accepted it. It is a reference of a pointer. –  Naszta Apr 1 '11 at 13:15
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