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typedef struct employee
{
    int age;
    char name[30];
} emp_t;

emp_t * e;

int main( )
{
    printf("\nName : ");
    scanf("%s", &e->name);
    return 0;
}

this code compiles but when I try to enter my name such as "mukesh" it throughs out an error Can somebody explain why this is happening In the structure I used char name[] as well as char * name......did't work I don't understand why???????

do I need to allocate memory dynamically to the structure employee and then assign it it to e->name

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What is exactly your error? My guess is you have a segmentation fault –  Dimitri Apr 1 '11 at 13:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, you must allocate the storage before you can access it. Otherwise you'll just be pointing at some random location in memory.

Try this:

typedef struct employee
{
    int age;
    char name[30];
} emp_t;

emp_t * e;

int main( )
{
    e = malloc(sizeof(emp_t));
    printf("\nName : ");
    scanf("%s", e->name);
    return 0;
}
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Thanks , now I got it –  mukesh Apr 1 '11 at 13:13
    
@mukesh, mark as solved if this workd! –  Steven Feldman Apr 1 '11 at 13:16
    
side note: in C, the cast is unnecessary. you can simply write e = malloc(sizeof(emp_t)); –  Mat Apr 1 '11 at 14:34
    
Good point Mat - adjusted accordingly –  Jon Cage Apr 1 '11 at 14:56

you should use

scanf("%s",e->name)  // name is itself an array, so need not to use &
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ah, yes, I also missed this. –  Diego Sevilla Apr 1 '11 at 13:04

Yes, you have to allocate memory for what e is pointing first. Something like:

e = (emp_t*) malloc(sizeof(emp_t));

Also, as some other noted above (and just for completeness), you should be using e->name instead of &e->name), as a name of an array (name) is implicitly the address of its first byte.

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Thanks, Diego but is there any specific reason why can't I do scanf("%s", &e->name); why it does not work –  mukesh Apr 1 '11 at 13:10
    
@mukesh : no need to use & when you are scaning for array. name of array variable itself refers to first element location. –  Gaurav Apr 1 '11 at 13:15
    
Thanks I got it –  mukesh Apr 1 '11 at 13:22

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