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Hi I have two select queries and I wanna merge them into a single table having 5 columns as Id, ClientId, Height, EyeColor, HairColor

Queries are:

SELECT ClientCharacteristic.Id
     , ClientCharacteristic.ClientId
     , ClientCharacteristic.Height
     , GeneralLookup.LookupItem as EyeColor  
FROM dbo.ClientCharacteristic
  INNER JOIN dbo.GeneralLookup
    ON GeneralLookup.Id=ClientCharacteristic.glEyeColorId 



SELECT ClientCharacteristic.Id
     , ClientCharacteristic.ClientId
     , ClientCharacteristic.Height
     , GeneralLookup.LookupItem as HairColor  
FROM dbo.ClientCharacteristic
  INNER JOIN dbo.GeneralLookup
    ON GeneralLookup.Id=ClientCharacteristic.glHairColorId
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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Generally, you'd use UNION to "merge" queries. However, in this particular case that would result in a single column containing both EyeColor and HairColor across otherwise duplicated rows. I doubt that's what you want. A better approach would likely be to alias your joined table so that you can join it twice:

SELECT
  ClientCharacteristic.Id,
  ClientCharacteristic.ClientId, 
  ClientCharacteristic.Height,
  EyeLookup.LookupItem as EyeColor,
  HairLookup.LookupItem as HairColor
FROM
  dbo.ClientCharacteristic
  INNER JOIN dbo.GeneralLookup AS EyeLookup
    ON EyeLookup.Id=ClientCharacteristic.glEyeColorId
  INNER JOIN dbo.GeneralLookup AS HairLookup
    ON HairLookup.Id=ClientCharacteristic.glHairColorId

The key thing to notice here is the AS clause in the INNER JOIN clauses, which aliases the joined table for the purpose of the rest of the query. This allows you to join the same table multiple times on different keys so that it can be referenced for different purposes.

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union or union all should do it as long as the columns line up and are the same type (or can be implicitly converted)

Following Davids Advice and re-reading the question 5 columns would be

SELECT ClientCharacteristic.Id, 
       ClientCharacteristic.ClientId,  
       ClientCharacteristic.Height, 
       Eye.LookupItem as EyeColor
       Hair.LookupItem AS HairColor
FROM 
    dbo.ClientCharacteristic 
INNER JOIN 
    dbo.GeneralLookup Eye
    ON  Eye.Id=ClientCharacteristic.glEyeColorId     
INNER JOIN
    dbo.GeneralLookup Hair
    ON Hair.Id=ClientCharacteristic.glHairColorId 
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1  
The types may be implicitly converted, but I doubt "HairColor" and "EyeColor" should be a single column for any business purpose in the software. –  David Apr 1 '11 at 14:50

You can use UNION to merge two queries into one.

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1  
That's kind of a broad statement. How would UNION handle the difference between HairColor and EyeColor in the two queries here? –  David Apr 1 '11 at 14:55
    
@David: Sorry, you're right - I'd neglected the specifics of the question! +1 for your answer. –  Town Apr 1 '11 at 15:24
SELECT ClientCharacteristic.Id, ClientCharacteristic.ClientId, ClientCharacteristic.Height, GeneralLookup.LookupItem as EyeColor, '' as HairColor    
FROM dbo.ClientCharacteristic INNER JOIN dbo.GeneralLookup ON GeneralLookup.Id=ClientCharacteristic.glEyeColorId
UNION
SELECT ClientCharacteristic.Id, ClientCharacteristic.ClientId, ClientCharacteristic.Height, '' as EyeColor, GeneralLookup.LookupItem as HairColor    
FROM dbo.ClientCharacteristic INNER JOIN dbo.GeneralLookup ON GeneralLookup.Id=ClientCharacteristic.glHairColorId
share|improve this answer
    
How would you address the fact that HairColor and EyeColor are being merged as a single column across otherwise duplicated rows? –  David Apr 1 '11 at 14:51
    
I though it was to merge them. already fixed the query to place them in different rows –  Daniel Apr 1 '11 at 14:55
    
So each "person" in the data will have two resulting rows, one with their hair color and an empty eye color, and one with their eye color and an empty hair color? That's probably not going to be very intuitive... –  David Apr 1 '11 at 14:58
    
Still not very good. This will give you two rows for each Id, one that contains the eye color with a NULL hair color, and one that contains the hair color with a NULL eye color. Granted, the question is not well phrased in terms of what "merge" means, but since both queries draw most of their columns from ClientCharacteristic, it seems likely that the goal is one row per Id that includes both the hair color and the eye color. –  Dave Costa Apr 1 '11 at 15:01
    
@David and @Dave Costa well, first time I read the question I got the idea (a wrong one) that what @asma wanted was a union. Without a doubt that @David solution seems a lot better. –  Daniel Apr 1 '11 at 15:08

You can use de UNION operator like this:

SELECT ClientCharacteristic.Id, ClientCharacteristic.ClientId, ClientCharacteristic.Height, GeneralLookup.LookupItem as EyeColor
FROM dbo.ClientCharacteristic INNER JOIN dbo.GeneralLookup ON GeneralLookup.Id=ClientCharacteristic.glEyeColorId
UNION
SELECT ClientCharacteristic.Id, ClientCharacteristic.ClientId, ClientCharacteristic.Height, GeneralLookup.LookupItem as HairColor
FROM dbo.ClientCharacteristic INNER JOIN dbo.GeneralLookup ON GeneralLookup.Id=ClientCharacteristic.glHairColorId

Note that UNION operator discards duplicate tuples. To keep duplicate values in the resulting table, use UNION ALL.

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Union joins rows, not columns –  asma Apr 1 '11 at 14:52
    
Yes indeed, misread the question. Will correct it shortly. –  CGK Apr 1 '11 at 16:00

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