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I have a piece of code that had a ORDER BY with a CASE in it :

                        ORDER BY
                        (
                            CASE
                                WHEN r.id BETWEEN 900 AND 999 THEN '1AAAAA'
                                ELSE '2'
                                    || upper(id.name)
                            END) ASC,
                        r.date DESC ;

Could someone explain :

  1. what is the meaning of the '1AAAAA' and '2' ?
  2. what is the meaning of

    || upper(id.name)

Thanks a lot

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4 Answers

In PL/SQL, || is the concatenation operator.

Exactly how the ordering is happening depends on the rest of the query, but it looks like it's putting records with r.id BETWEEN 900 AND 999 before other records, which are sorted by id.name.

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The case expression evaluates to a value

CASE
  WHEN r.id BETWEEN 900 AND 999 THEN '1AAAAA'
  ELSE '2'
    || upper(id.name)
END

The whole above block of code with either evaluate to '1AAAAA', or '2[value-of-r.id]' depending on the value of r.id.

As this is in the order by clause this value will be used to sort the results as follows:

  1. first list all records where r.id is between 900 and 999
  2. then list all other records in ascending order of r.id (the || is the string concatenation operator).
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1  
Typo?: "between 900 and 1AAAAA" should be "between 900 and 999". –  Ken Apr 1 '11 at 15:35
    
@Ken: Yes definantely a typo; I've fixed now. –  Andy Skirrow Apr 3 '11 at 7:33
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Here is some data. As you can see the name sorts in ASCII order, which is not exactly the same as alphabetical order:

SQL> select id, name, somedate
  2  from t42
  3  order by name, somedate
  4  /

        ID NAME       SOMEDATE
---------- ---------- ---------
         8 Billington 24-MAR-11
        13 Cave       19-MAR-11
         4 Clarke     28-MAR-11
       919 Feuerstein 13-MAR-11
        16 Gasparotto 16-MAR-11
      1014 KULASH     18-MAR-11
         1 Kestelyn   31-MAR-11
       917 Kishore    15-MAR-11
         2 Lira       30-MAR-11
         6 PADFIELD   26-MAR-11
        11 Rigby      21-MAR-11
      1007 Robertson  25-MAR-11
        12 SCHNEIDER  20-MAR-11
         9 SPENCER    23-MAR-11
         3 TRICHLER   29-MAR-11
       918 VERREYNNE  14-MAR-11
        10 boehmer    22-MAR-11
        15 hall       17-MAR-11
       920 poder      12-MAR-11
         5 van wijk   27-MAR-11
      1021            11-MAR-11

21 rows selected.

SQL>

Sorting by upper(name) makes it case-insensitive:

SQL> select id, name, somedate
  2  from t42
  3  order by upper(name), somedate
  4  /

        ID NAME       SOMEDATE
---------- ---------- ---------
         8 Billington 24-MAR-11
        10 boehmer    22-MAR-11
        13 Cave       19-MAR-11
         4 Clarke     28-MAR-11
       919 Feuerstein 13-MAR-11
        16 Gasparotto 16-MAR-11
        15 hall       17-MAR-11
         1 Kestelyn   31-MAR-11
       917 Kishore    15-MAR-11
      1014 KULASH     18-MAR-11
         2 Lira       30-MAR-11
         6 PADFIELD   26-MAR-11
       920 poder      12-MAR-11
        11 Rigby      21-MAR-11
      1007 Robertson  25-MAR-11
        12 SCHNEIDER  20-MAR-11
         9 SPENCER    23-MAR-11
         3 TRICHLER   29-MAR-11
         5 van wijk   27-MAR-11
       918 VERREYNNE  14-MAR-11
      1021            11-MAR-11

21 rows selected.

SQL>

The CASE() changes this further by grouping all the records within the specfied ID range first, then all the other records. The records in the selected range are just sorted by the DATE whereas the other records are still sorted by name then date:

SQL> select id, name, somedate
  2  from t42
  3          ORDER BY
  4          (
  5              CASE
  6                  WHEN id BETWEEN 900 AND 999 THEN '1AAAAA'
  7                  ELSE '2'
  8                      || upper(name)
  9              END) ASC,
 10          somedate DESC
 11  /

        ID NAME       SOMEDATE
---------- ---------- ---------
       917 Kishore    15-MAR-11
       918 VERREYNNE  14-MAR-11
       919 Feuerstein 13-MAR-11
       920 poder      12-MAR-11
      1021            11-MAR-11
         8 Billington 24-MAR-11
        10 boehmer    22-MAR-11
        13 Cave       19-MAR-11
         4 Clarke     28-MAR-11
        16 Gasparotto 16-MAR-11
        15 hall       17-MAR-11
         1 Kestelyn   31-MAR-11
      1014 KULASH     18-MAR-11
         2 Lira       30-MAR-11
         6 PADFIELD   26-MAR-11
        11 Rigby      21-MAR-11
      1007 Robertson  25-MAR-11
        12 SCHNEIDER  20-MAR-11
         9 SPENCER    23-MAR-11
         3 TRICHLER   29-MAR-11
         5 van wijk   27-MAR-11

21 rows selected.

SQL>
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1. what is the meaning of the '1AAAAA' and '2' ?

That are literal constants.

2. what is the meaning of || upper(id.name)

|| is the SQL standard concatenation operator. 'A' || 'B' produces 'AB'.

IMHO, your question is what the entire order by case means, so, go step by step:

             ORDER BY
                    (
                        CASE
                            WHEN r.id BETWEEN 900 AND 999 THEN '1AAAAA'
                            ELSE '2'
                                || upper(id.name)
                        END) ASC,
                    r.date DESC ;

This will order your result set by the result of the case expression evaluation (ascendant), then by r.date (descendant).

The case will just return '1AAAAA' for any ID between 900 and 999 (this will then be ordered by r.date, remember?'

For any other value, it will concatenate 2 before the id.name.

This ensures any record with id between 900 and 999 to appear in the first "group", which is ordered just by date, descending. Then a second group will contain all the other records, ordered by the upper of name, then by the date.

You may want to see this data to understand how this works... just add the case expression to your select statement as a new column.

For example if your query starts like this:

SELECT r.id, id.name
  FROM

add the case like this:

SELECT r.id, id.name
       , 
       CASE
         WHEN r.id BETWEEN 900 AND 999 THEN '1AAAAA'
         ELSE '2'|| upper(id.name)
       END ORDER_CRITERIA
  FROM

This will help you understand what's going on with that expression, as you will see the produced data as the last column of your query.

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