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I am new to javascript, and I just noticed a javascript behavior that I haven't seen documented anywhere. If I have a DOM element with an assigned id, say "x", then in my javascript, that element is automatically assigned to variable x. I see this in chrome and safari. Is this a documented feature of javascript?

For example:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
</head>
<body>
<form id='x'>
<input type='text' name='info' id='info'/>
<input type='submit' name='submit' value='Complete'/>
</form>
<script type='text/javascript'>
  window.onload = function() {
    alert( x==document.getElementById('x') );
    info.value = 'Test me!';
  }
</script>
</body>
</html>

When loaded, it will alert true, and the input area will show 'Test me!'. If this is the right behavior, why do we need document.getElementById at all?

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3 Answers

This behavior is documented in the HTML standard (chapter 6.2.4).

The standard defines "named elements" which are HTML elements that have either a name or id attribute set. (Note that the name attribute is only defined on certain types of HTML elements.)

For each named element, the browser (environment) defines a corresponding global property.

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As of my comment, Chrome and Firefox implement this behavior but IE11 does not. I must confess I didn't even know about this feature until now. –  NobodyMan Apr 7 at 21:10
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<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <title>Test</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="w"></div>

        <script type="text/javascript">

        alert( w );

        w = null;

        alert( w );

        </script>
    </body>
</html>

Try this test in IE8. You will figure out that w is global and cannot be overwritten. Change "w = null" in "var w = null" and reload (after emptying cache)...

IE8 checks for variables before runtime and removes the global correspondent. I really can't await the day when web developers don't have to support IE8 any more...

HINT: don't use variable names equal to DOM element id's.. OMG OMG

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This is an IE-only non-standard feature.

Do not rely on it.

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Oh no! Horrible feature! I hope this is an April Fools' Day joke. –  Marcel Korpel Apr 1 '11 at 15:49
2  
It's not non-standard: whatwg.org/specs/web-apps/current-work/multipage/… See the bullet: "HTML elements that have an id content attribute whose value is name." –  Šime Vidas Apr 1 '11 at 15:56
2  
This is not IE-only, try it in other browsers using jsfiddle.net/KooiInc/ghY99. –  KooiInc Apr 1 '11 at 15:58
1  
This behavior is present in IE9, Chrome, Opera and Safari. Only Firefox 4 does not implement this. See here: jsfiddle.net/WbwEC –  Šime Vidas Apr 1 '11 at 16:00
    
@Marcel It's real. Fortunately, existing global properties cannot be replaced - if you have this <div id="document">, then document will still point to the document object, and not the DIV. –  Šime Vidas Apr 1 '11 at 16:19
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