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I have a really simple extension method wich is contrained for IComparable instances:

public static bool Between<T>(this T comparable, T min, T max) where T : IComparable<T>
{
    return comparable.CompareTo(min) >= 0 && comparable.CompareTo(max) <= 0;
}

Which would be the correct approach to test this method? I tried mocking IComparable instances to no avail... I use NUnit and Moq, but I'm really a noob in TDD.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try the following in Moq. This will test the case where the value is actually between the provided values.

var mock = new Mock<IComparable<string>>();
mock.Setup(x => x.CompareTo("a")).Returns(1).Verifiable();
mock.Setup(x => x.CompareTo("z")).Returns(-1).Verifiable();
Assert.IsTrue(mock.Object.Between("a", "z"));
mock.Verify();

You can modify this fairly quickly to test the negative cases

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There is no need to mock anything. You can use any IComparable object like Integers or Strings.
Check it out:

[TestMethod]
public void YourTestName()
{
    Assert.IsTrue(2.Between(0, 5));
    Assert.IsFalse("a".Between("b", "d"));
}

Keep It Simple.

By the way, I would rename that method to IsBetween instead of just Between. I found it much more fluent.

[TestMethod]
public void YourTestName()
{
    Assert.IsTrue(2.IsBetween(0, 5));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. But I thought it would be better to try for all IComparables. – Carles Company Apr 1 '11 at 16:51
    
Your extension method is quite simple. I don't think it should be tested so heavily. I'd focus more on the methods with business rules that tend to change often. – goenning Apr 1 '11 at 16:54
    
You are right. And it's not a method that will ever change, the definition for Between is quite straightforward.. But it was more a methodology question. – Carles Company Apr 1 '11 at 16:56

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