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Consider a C++ class that exports an enum, maintains an internal array over that enum, and wants to export a command that accepts values from the enum.

class foo {
public:
  enum color {
    red,
    yellow,
    green,
    NUM_COLORS
  };
private:
  something somebody[NUM_COLORS];
public:
  void command(color c);
};

Is there a clean way to export only the actual colors, but not NUM_COLORS? I do not want to have to check for the edge case on every call when the compiler's type system really ought to be able to do it for me.

The obvious hack is:

class foo {
public:
  enum color {
    red,
    yellow,
    green
  };
private:
  /* something like */ const unsigned NUM_COLORS = green+1;
  unsigned LEDs_in_stock[NUM_COLORS];
public:
  void command(color c);
};

This of course is a ticking time bomb, waiting for some poor overworked maintenance programmer to add provisions for blue LEDs, and forget to update the NUM_COLORS line.

Let me clarify a bit. What I want, in this particular case, is to be able to say:

class foo {
public:
  enum color {
    red,
    yellow,
    green
  };
  void command(color c);
private:
  something somebody[color];
};

It is my understanding that C++ doesn't allow this.

share|improve this question
1  
As far as I'm aware, what you're trying to do isn't really possible. The next best thing that comes to mind is holding down your shift key really hard and writing a VERY IMPORTANT COMMENT below the enum. – Collin Dauphinee Apr 1 '11 at 16:46
    
The compiler will not help you from the stupid. Someone could easily write foo::color(7) anyway. – Bo Persson Apr 1 '11 at 17:08
up vote 2 down vote accepted

My first thought would be to try and solve the problem as you lay it, but after a bit reflexion, I would shift the burden to command:

void command(color c) {
  assert(0 <= c && c < NUM_COLORS && "Invalid argument");
}

Since enums are so weak types, you need to check the input anyway, as anyone could easily provide crappy arguments:

Foo foo;
foo.command(static_cast<Foo::color>(3)); // 3 is green, right ?

Original solution:

class Foo {
  struct impl { enum { red, yellow, green, NUM_COLORS }; };
public:
  enum color { red = impl::red, yellow = impl::yellow, green = impl::green };

  void command(color c);
};

Unfortunately there is a lot of duplication going on (and I actually originaly typed green = impl::yellow; though it does not matter if you never refer to impl's values directly).

Otherwise, there is always the macro trick:

#define MY_DEFINE_ENUM(Type, Elements)       \
  enum Type { BOOST_PP_SEQ_ENUM(Elements) }; \
  inline size_t size(Type) { return BOOST_PP_SEQ_SIZE(Elements); }

Which uses an evil macro and obscure preprocessor machinery to avoid code duplicaton. It obviously only works for consecutive enum elements (it returns the number of elements, not the maximum number).

share|improve this answer
    
this looks like it is as close as I am going to get to what I want in C++. It also shows me how to solve the generalization (which I expected to be painful) of wanting to export some but not all, not necessarily contiguous enum literals. It appears that there are some things the C++ design committee just doesn't comprehend. – John R. Strohm Apr 2 '11 at 3:39
    
@John R. Strohm: I agree, the enum in C++ is somewhat broken. There are two concepts embedded in one: the ability to just specify an enumeration and the ability to "map" values to names. They are semantically different and throwing them in a single concept make it awkward (that and the lack of introspection, I fail to see why they don't provide compile-time introspection since it's free). – Matthieu M. Apr 2 '11 at 9:51
    
I don't know enough about introspection, compile-time or otherwise, to comment directly. I observe that the feature I want has been in Ada since the first version of the language, released officially in 1983. – John R. Strohm Apr 2 '11 at 12:34
    
@John R. Strohm: I wish it was in C++ :/ – Matthieu M. Apr 2 '11 at 12:41

Is putting the enumeration into a base class an option?

class foo_enums {
public:
  enum color {
    red,
    yellow,
    green,
    NUM_COLORS
  };

protected:
  foo_enums() { }
  ~foo_enums() { }
};

class foo : public foo_enums {
private:
  unsigned LEDs_in_stock[NUM_COLORS];

  /* make NUM_* values inaccessible */
  using foo_enums::NUM_COLORS;

public:
  void command(color c);
};

Personally I wouldn't do this, as it looks like an overly complex work around. I would simply forbid the caller to pass NUM_COLORS. True, the type system doesn't check that. But surely this is an easy thing to check for human programmers. Why would they pass NUM_COLORS?

share|improve this answer
    
Next question: how do you hide foo_enums? Anyone can use foo_enums::NUM_COLORS... – André Caron Apr 1 '11 at 16:57
    
@André: Put it in a detail namespace and every sane programmer knows they shouldn't even be thinking of touching it. – Xeo Apr 1 '11 at 17:01
1  
@Andre anyone can dereference a null pointer. How do we stop them from doing that? If they can't read and follow a comment saying "This enum constant should only be used by class "foo", then that's a pity. Quoting Herb Sutter: Remember to distinguish between "protecting against Murphy vs. protecting against Machiavelli." – Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 1 '11 at 17:03
    
what I want, in this case, is for the language to allow me to say enum foo {baz, bar, waldo}; and then int cruft[foo];. I can live with a restriction in the language that this is only permissible if none of the enum values have value overrides (example: enum mangled_foo {baz, bar=43, waldo};). – John R. Strohm Apr 1 '11 at 17:20

There's a fine line between protecting your future maintainers from making simple/easy mistakes, and trying to stop something that should be obviously wrong, such as using the NUM_COLORS value.

In your case I'd suggest asserting the input at key functions and leaving it at that.

I believe you could use a template proxy class that specializes and static_asserts on NUM_COLORS to prevent users passing it into your functions.

I typed something out that seems to work.

class foo {
public:
  enum color {
    red,
    yellow,
    green,
    NUM_COLORS
  };

  class Color_Rep
  {
    color c;
  protected:
    Color_Rep(color which_color) : c(which_color) { }
  };

  template <color C>
  struct Color : public Color_Rep
  {
    Color() : Color_Rep(C) { }
    enum { value = C };
  };

private:
  int bar[NUM_COLORS];

public:
  void command(Color_Rep c);
};

// Deny access to command(NUM_COLORS).
template <>
struct foo::Color<foo::NUM_COLORS>
{
};

int main()
{
    foo().command(foo::Color<foo::red>());
    foo().command(foo::Color<foo::green>());
    foo().command(foo::Color<foo::NUM_COLORS>());  // Won't compile.
}
share|improve this answer
    
if there is one thing that I have learned, it is that expecting people not to do something that is obviously wrong is an exercise in foolhardiness. They'll do it, guaranteed, unless you PREVENT them. Example: Nortel Networks software group had a written hard-and-fast no-exceptions policy "You shall test for null before dereferencing a pointer." Guess what some nameless coder did? (Guess who got to track down the resulting intermittent hard crash?) – John R. Strohm Apr 1 '11 at 17:10
    
@John R. Strohm I personally consider that Nortel example to be completely different from this situation. It's easy to forget to check a pointer for null (I won't argue if it's a good idea or not) but in my mind using an enumerated value NUM_COLORS is totally different: An explicit decision by the coder to use it. Do we go through hoops to try to prevent people from #define private public? – Mark B Apr 1 '11 at 17:16

A solution would be to use a map:

std::map<color, unsigned> LEDs_in_stock;

LEDs_in_stock[red] += 2;

LEDs_in_stock[red]; // = 2
LEDs_in_stock[green]; // = 0

This way you keep you enum clean, and do not need to hard-code any size.

share|improve this answer
    
I took a look at the map header file, and it appears at first glance to carry a lot of baggage. I need to throw together a test program and see what kind of code is actually generated. I can't live with a solution that imposes hundreds or thousands of instructions overhead for a simple array reference, and I shouldn't have to. – John R. Strohm Apr 1 '11 at 17:23
    
Given the overhead of the map node with regard to its poor payload, it sure seems overkill. – Matthieu M. Apr 1 '11 at 17:25
    
Of course it's heavier, but I think the C++ code is more important than the binary code. It's better to have a very simple, secure and working c++ code generating a larger binary, because it's won't be a pain for the processor to exeute it. wherease it's a pain for the programer to maintain a hacky code. That's the solution i would choose personnaly, but it's up to you of course ^^ – BigBourin Apr 1 '11 at 17:33
    
Unfortunately, my domain of discourse is resource-limited embedded systems. – John R. Strohm Apr 1 '11 at 19:09

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