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This is my code:

#footer {
   font-size: 10px;
   position:absolute;
   bottom:0;
   background:#ffffff;
}

I've no idea what is wrong with this - can anyone help?

EDIT: For some more clarity on what's wrong: The footer is displayed on the bottom as expected when the page loads. However, when the web page's height is > than the dimensions on the screen such that a scroll bar appears, the footer stays in that same location. That is to say, when the height of the page is <= 100%, the footer is at the bottom. However, when the page height is >100%, the footer is NOT at the bottom of that page, but at the bottom of the visible screen instead.

EDIT: Surprisingly, none of the solutions below worked. I ended up implementing a sidebar instead.

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2  
Why? What's wrong? –  SLaks Apr 1 '11 at 17:46
    
1  
What SLaks is saying is: this is a poor question, as you have not described either the results you want nor the results you are getting. What you have written is valid CSS code, that is all I can tell you. Also, as noted above, this question has been asked and answered previously. –  Phrogz Apr 1 '11 at 17:51
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8 Answers

You're probably looking for this example:

<div class="wrapper">
    Your content here
    <div class="push"></div>
</div>
<div class="footer">
    Your footer here
</div>

CSS:

For a 142-pixel footer

html, body {
    height: 100%;
}
.wrapper {
    min-height: 100%;
    height: auto !important;
    height: 100%;
    margin: 0 auto -142px; /* the bottom margin is the negative value of the footer's height */
}
.footer, .push {
    height: 142px; /* .push must be the same height as .footer */
}

/*

Sticky Footer by Ryan Fait
http://ryanfait.com/

*/
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just simply try this

position: fixed;  
bottom: 0px;
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The wrapper is the rest of your page. The negative/positive margin/height values are where the magic happens.

.wrapper 
  {
    min-height: 100%;
    height: auto !important;
    height: 100%;
    margin: 0 auto -142px;
  }
.footer, .push 
  {
    height: 142px; /* .push must be the same height as .footer */
  }
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Why not with jquery?

Put a wrapper div between header and footer and assign min-height property for wrapper with jquery equal with the difference between document height and (header height + footer height).

<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function(){
 var dh = $(document).height(); //document height here
 var hh = $('header').height(); //header height
 var fh = $('footer').height(); //footer height
 var wh = Number(dh - hh - fh); //this is the height for the wrapper
 $('#wrapper').css('min-height', wh); //set the height for the wrapper div
});
</script>
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I vote for the simplest solution already mentioned:

position: fixed;  
bottom: 0px;

Maybe it is necessary to set width too:

width: 100%;
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Your CSS is fine, are you sure that your footer is ID'd properly? Remember, the # selector is for element ID, not class.

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#footer { clear:both; position:fixed; width:100%; height:50px; bottom:0; background:black;}
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Do not use position: absolute; for any footer as the page will change in height. If it is absolute then your footer will not move with the page height.

You want to use ryan fait's method.

Although I would personally do it like this;

.wrap {margin: auto; width: 980px;}
#content {min-height: 600px;}
#footer {height: 300px;}

<div class="wrap">
<div id="content">
</div>
</div>
<div id="footer">
<div class="wrap">
</div>
</div>

This way you don't have to mess around with negative margins and padding. Also this can easily be a part of html5 changing #footer to

<footer>
</footer>
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Where did you get 300px and 600px? Not very generic solution. –  SummerBreeze May 19 at 16:08
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