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is there any command that counts the number of same values in a map?

like:

map<int, string> m;
m[1] = "A";
m[22] = "A";
m[53] = "C";
m[12] = "A";
m[6] = "A";

int count = m.count("A");// 4

or should i just write it myself, since its not too hard?

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2  
The first thing that came to mind was to create another std::map<string , int> which will be used to count the frequency of each .second –  Muggen Apr 1 '11 at 19:00
1  
@Muggen: That should be the last thing that comes to mind. You're just introducing a great deal of complexity to accomplish a very simple task for which there are already toos. –  John Dibling Apr 1 '11 at 19:27
    
@John Dibling: What do you mean by a great deal of complexity? If you see from the answers below, without C++0x support you'll have a reasonable amount of code to write if you are leveraging STL count_if. I am inclined to believe that using another map will require less amount of code. Also using map has better runtime complexity i.e. O(log n) whereas you need to go through all map elements if you use count_if i.e. O(n) –  ryaner Apr 1 '11 at 20:19
    
@ryaner: Using a second map to store frequencies is better if you need to perform a large number of counts. This approach also requires that the elements stored in the container are comparable. If you only need to perform a single count, then it is far better to enumerate the items using count_if. –  James McNellis Apr 1 '11 at 22:45
    
@James McNellis: I can see your point and I also think your answer is nice and of course educational. But still, it's not answering my question to John Dibling about what sorts of complexity is using a second map imposing, compared to having to define a function object =). Yes, it requires operator< to be implemented (probably irrelevant if key is std::string). Yes, it's waste of memory if you only count it once (even though poster didn't specify). But complexity in implementation? I don't buy that =) –  ryaner Apr 2 '11 at 4:47
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use std::count with a custom value parameter:

struct Compare {
    std::string str;
    Compare(const std::string& str) : str(str) {}
};
bool operator==(const std::pair<int, std::string>&p, const Compare& c) {
    return c.str == p.second;
}
bool operator==(const Compare& c, const std::pair<int, std::string>&p) {
    return c.str == p.second;
}


int  main() {
    std::map<int, std::string> m;
    m[1] = "A";
    m[22] = "A";
    m[53] = "C";
    m[12] = "A";
    m[6] = "A";

    int count = std::count(m.begin(), m.end(), Compare("A"));

    std::cout << count << "\n";
}
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2  
This is a nice looking solution. –  James McNellis Apr 1 '11 at 19:25
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You can use the count_if algorithm with a custom predicate function object:

template <typename Pair>
struct second_equal_to
    : std::unary_function<const Pair&, bool>
{
    second_equal_to(const typename Pair::second_type& value)
        : value_(value) { }

    bool operator()(const Pair& p) const
    {
        return p.second == *value_;
    }

private:
    typename Pair::second_type value_;
};

Usage:

typedef std::map<int, std::string> Map;
typedef Map::value_type MapEntry;
std::count_if(m.begin(), m.end(), second_equal_to<MapEntry>("A"));

Or, for a more generic solution, you can write an apply_to_second predicate transformer:

template <typename Pair, typename Predicate>
struct apply_to_second_f
    : std::unary_function<const Pair&, bool>
{
    apply_to_second_f(const Predicate& p)
        : predicate_(p) { }

    bool operator()(const Pair& p) const
    {
        return predicate_(p.second);
    }

    Predicate predicate_;
};

template <typename Pair, typename Predicate>
apply_to_second_f<Pair, Predicate> apply_to_second(const Predicate& p)
{
    return apply_to_second_f<Pair, Predicate>(p);
}

Usage:

std::count_if(m.begin(), m.end(), 
    apply_to_second<MapEntry>(std::bind2nd(std::equal_to<std::string>(), "A")));

If you have a compiler that supports lambda expressions, you don't need any custom predicate functor at all; you can use a much simpler lambda:

std::count_if(m.begin(), m.end(), [](const MapEntry& e) { 
    return e.second == "A";
});
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My unicorn give you a thumbs-up and a +1 –  John Dibling Apr 1 '11 at 19:26
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STL's count_if and it's quite doable manually.

EDIT: Sorry should be count_if not count

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map::count is counting the keys and not the element, so the example in your question would be wrong. You may want to consider using an extra map to keep track of the count of each value.

map<string, int> value_count;
// use like this
++value_count[val];
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Definitely the simpler solution when carrying an extra variable around isn't an issue. –  Quentin Pradet Oct 16 '12 at 13:30
    
-1 Now you have to keep two maps in sync. Every time you modify the first, you have to make sure that the second one is also modified accordingly. I believe this is the "great deal of complexity" that was referred to earlier. Unless you refactor this into a proper container class which deals with keeping both maps in sync I'd advise against this. –  Andreas Haferburg Apr 24 at 11:52
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This should be generic enough:

template< class T1, class T2 >
class Condition
{
    public:
        Condition( const T2& val ) : _val( val ) {};
        bool operator()( const typename std::pair< const T1, T2 >& aPair )
        {
            return (aPair.second == _val);
        }
    private:
        const T2 _val;
};

then you can use it like this:

Condition< int, std::string > comp( "A" );
size_t count = std::count_if( m.begin(), m.end(), comp );

Do notice that this is not really all that different from previous answers, but it should be reusable with anything that iterates over pairs as well. Just rename Condition to something more meaningful.

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