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Today in university I was recommended by a professor that I'd check for (this != &copy) in the copy constructor, similarly to how you should do it when overloading operator=. However I questioned that because I can't think of any situation where this would ever be equal to the argument when constructing an object.

He admitted that I made a good point. So, my question is, does it make sense to perform this checking, or is it impossible that this would screw up?

Edit: I guess I was right, but I'll just leave this open for a while. Maybe someone's coming up with some crazy cryptic c++ magic.

Edit2: Test a(a) compiles on MinGW, but not MSVS10. Test a = a compiles on both, so I assume gcc will behave somewhat similar. Unfortunately, VS does not show a debug message with "Variable a used without being initialized". It does however properly show this message for int i = i. Could this actually be considered a c++ language flaw?

class Test
{
   Test(const Test &copy)
   {
      if (this != &copy) // <-- this line: yay or nay?
      {
      }
   }
   Test &operator=(const Test &rhd)
   {
      if (this != &rhd) // <-- in this case, it makes sense
      {
      }
   }
};
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10  
I think it must've been your professor's April Fools joke. –  Mehrdad Apr 1 '11 at 19:05
    
@Mehrdad: I hope so, anyway. –  Fred Larson Apr 1 '11 at 19:06
2  
possible duplicate of std::string x(x); –  FredOverflow Apr 1 '11 at 19:28
3  
Your professor likely does not master C++ and should not be teaching it. It is almost never necessary to check for self assignment if you're using the copy-and-swap idiom. [I say "almost" because it is a form of (premature) optimization.]. If you don't know the copy and swap idiom, you must learn it, and learn not to write those creepy code duplicating self assignment testing memory leaking exception unsafe 15-line long assignment operators. –  Alexandre C. Apr 1 '11 at 19:55
1  
@ybungalobill Because it enables you to create an object (the second a) without calling any constructor for it (not even default constructor). When you then copy an unconstructed object, all your RAII endeavors will be screwed up. To make it worse, without further checking, the code won't even crash until destruction of the original &copy object. Sure, these assignments are nothing but wrong, but IMO they should also be considered wrong then, by K&R C already. Even copy and swap could screw up device handles etc. –  dialer Apr 2 '11 at 8:57
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7 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Personally, I think your professor is wrong and here's why.

Sure, the code will compile. And sure, the code is broken. But that's as far as your Prof has gone with his reasoning, and he then concludes "oh well we should see if we're self-assigning and if we are, just return."

But that is bad, for the same reason why having a global catch-all catch(...) which does nothing is Evil. You're preventing an immediate problem, but the problem still exists. The code is invalid. You shouldn't be calling a constructor with a pointer to self. The solution isn't to ignore the problem and carry on. The solution is to fix the code. The best thing that could happen is your code will crash immediately. The worst thing is that the code will continue in an invalid state for some period of time and then either crash later (when the call stack will do you no good), or generate invalid output.

No, your professor is wrong. Do the assignment without checking for self-assignment. Find the defect in a code review or let the code crash and find it in a debug session. But don't just carry on as if nothing has happened.

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That is also what the answers std::string x(x) suggest. I understand what you're saying, but unfortunately it doesn't crash. –  dialer Apr 1 '11 at 19:44
    
Yep, and I just wnet and u/v'ed all those answers. –  John Dibling Apr 1 '11 at 19:46
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In normal situations, it seems like here is no need to. But consider the following situation:

class A{ 
   char *name ; 
public:
   A & operator=(const A & rhs);
};

A & A::operator=(const A &rhs){
   name = (char *) malloc(strlen(rhs.name)+1);
   if(name) 
      strcpy(name,rhs.name);
   return *this;
}

Obviously the code above has an issue in the case when we are doing self assignment. Before we can copy the content, the pointer to the original data will be lost since they both refer to same pointer. And that is why we need to check for self assignment. Function should be like

A & A::operator=(const A &rhs){
     if(this != &rhs){
       name = (char *) malloc(strlen(rhs.name)+1);
       if(name) 
          strcpy(name,rhs.name);
     } 
   return *this;
}
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If you want to be paranoid, then:

class Test
{
   Test(const Test &copy)
   {
       assert(this != &copy);
       // ...
   }
};

You never want to continue if this == &copy. I've never bothered with this check. The error doesn't seem to frequently occur in the code I work with. However if your experience is different then the assert may well be worth it.

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When writing assignment operators and copy constructors, always do this:

struct MyClass
{
    MyClass(const MyClass& x)
    {
        // Implement copy constructor. Don't check for
        // self assignment, since &x is never equal to *this.
    }

    void swap(MyClass& x) throw()
    {
        // Implement lightweight swap. Swap pointers, not contents.
    }

    MyClass& operator=(MyClass x)
    {
        x.swap(*this); return *this;
    }
};

When passing x by value to the assignment operator, a copy is made. Then you swap it with *this, and let x's destructor be called at return, with the old value of *this. Simple, elegant, exception safe, no code duplication, and no need for self assignment testing.

If you don't know yet about exceptions, you may want to remember this idiom when learning exception safety (and ignore the throw() specifier for swap for now).

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1  
Never say always. Never say never either. :-) This answer (stackoverflow.com/questions/5072082/…) describes a popular class (std::vector) which would not benefit from an assignment implemented as "copy and swap". –  Howard Hinnant Apr 1 '11 at 23:35
    
@Howard: when you begin C++, it is probably better to say "always do copy and swap" than anything else, at least for the code non duplication and exception safety. The example you describe (thanks for it anyway) is rather contrived, and involves thread safety, which is another bag of worms. –  Alexandre C. Apr 2 '11 at 9:53
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Your instructor is probably trying to avoid this situtation -

#include <iostream>

class foo
{
    public:
    foo( const foo& temp )
    {
        if( this != &temp )
        std::cout << "Copy constructor \n";
    }
};

int main()
{
    foo obj(obj);  // This is any how meaning less because to construct
                   // "obj", the statement is passing "obj" itself as the argument

}

Since the name ( i.e., obj ) is visible at the time declaration, the code compiles and is valid.

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This is undefined behaviour. –  Alexandre C. Apr 1 '11 at 20:11
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This is valid C++ and calls the copy constructor:

Test a = a;

But it makes no sense, because a is used before it's initialized.

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It is syntactically valid, but still invalid to use the value before it is initialized. –  Bo Persson Apr 1 '11 at 19:30
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Your instructor may be thinking of the check for self-assignment in the copy assignment operator.

Checking for self-assignment in the assignment operator is recommended, in both Sutter and Alexandrescu's "C++ Coding Standards," and Scott Meyer's earlier "Effective C++."

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I pointed that out to him as well, which actually made him think a bit. Though, he wasn't entirely sure if the copy constructor needs it or not. –  dialer Apr 1 '11 at 19:07
2  
If he's really not sure, I would take everything he teaches with a few grains of salt. This is very basic C++ stuff. –  Jonathan Grynspan Apr 1 '11 at 19:20
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