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I've been going over this in my head and trying out different approaches for a few days now and I've searched SO (see What is best practice in converting XML to Java object?) and also Google for using JAXB over XSLT but cannot find a suitable answer. Over the years I've used Castor, JIBX and XSLT for various projects, so I know a little bit about XML binding.

My problem is that I have a very flat XML structure and I want to unmarshall it to Java classes and persist them directly to a relational database (has to be Oracle). A small example...

<Output>
    <Channel>
        <channelId>1</channelId>
        <genreId>1</genreId>
    </Channel>
    <Channel>
        <channelId>2</channelId>
        <genreId>2</genreId>
    </Channel>
    <Genre>
        <genreId>1</genreId>
        <name>Movies</name>
    </Genre>
    <Genre>
        <genreId>2</genreId>
        <name>Sport</name>
    </Genre>
    <ChannelName>
        <channelId>1</channelId>
        <name>The Movie Channel</name>
    </ChannelName>
    <ChannelName>
        <channelId>2</channelId>
        <name>The Sport Channel</name>
    </ChannelName>
</Output>

What I really want for the XML above is just two simple annotated classes in a OneToOne relationship, that I can persist using JPA. Basically I want classes that reflect the database tables like so:

class Channel {
    Long id;
    String name;
    Genre genre;        
}

class Genre {
    Long id;
    String name;       
}

The XML will only ever be unmarshalled and I am really looking for the simplest solution to this problem which I realise can be a subjective question.

I am a fan of XSLT so am really asking if it's good design to use XSLT to bend the original XML into a better structure the more closely matches the code and then just use some very simple JAXB annotations to bind to my classes. Or should I opt for doing the "transformation" using JAXB which I think would involve more actual Java code, for example XMLAdapters and more annotations. Basically, what is the benefit, or what else does JAXB give me over XSLT?

share|improve this question
    
Yes, this is subjective without a complete use case. As a rule of thumb, intermediate layers are not useful unless they bring some level of abstraction (wich is not the case for your JAXBonly vs. JAXB/XSLT dispute). That's why I would ask you who produce the XML document in the first place and why you can't use an XML database. –  user357812 Apr 1 '11 at 20:18
    
@Alejandro: I have no control over the XML format unfortunately. It is one source of data that I need to ingest into an existing Oracle database. I am basically doing a data conversion task from XML to an existing relational database. –  andyb Apr 1 '11 at 20:29
    
You may be interested in the @XmlPath extension in EclipseLink JAXB (MOXy): bdoughan.blogspot.com/2010/09/… –  Blaise Doughan Apr 1 '11 at 21:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

JAXB is the Java object-to-XML binding API.

XSL-T transforms XML to XML.

They don't feel like the same thing to me. The end result might be XML, but the source is different in each case.

I think the answer depends on your comfort level with each technology. If the XSL-T and JAXB combination feels natural to you, by all means go in that direction - unless it's a runtime operation that's performed repeatedly. In that case I'd say that performance might be a concern, depending on the complexity of the transformations.

share|improve this answer
    
I guess my issue is that XML in its original form would require more Java/JAXB to bind. However, if I can get the XML into a better shape using XSL first then my Java code would be simpler at the expense of a potentially costly transformation. Performance is not critical but I would not want XSL to become a bottleneck. –  andyb Apr 1 '11 at 20:14

Take a look at ReXSL, a web development framework that integrates JAXB and XSL, on top of JAX-RS. The site generates every page as a JAXB-annotated object, which is converted to XML by the framework. Then, this XML is delivered to the browser with attached XSL stylesheet.

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I'd suggest taking a look at XStream, specifically its Converters API.

XStream provides a very simple way to serialize or deserialize XML to Java, without needing to provide a XSD (which I believe JAXB will require).

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1  
JAXB does not require an XML schema. –  Blaise Doughan Apr 1 '11 at 19:51
    
Yes, I had discovered XStream whilst looking into this but I was hoping I could do what I wanted with straight JAXB rather than using a custom library. I will take another look, in particular the API you mentioned. –  andyb Apr 1 '11 at 20:23
4  
Check out: bdoughan.blogspot.com/2010/10/… –  Blaise Doughan Apr 1 '11 at 21:13
    
Blaise is the tech lead for JAXB. –  duffymo Apr 2 '11 at 17:42
    
@duffymo - I lead EclipseLink JAXB (MOXy), Martin Grebac is the current JAXB 2 (JSR-222) spec lead as well as the Metro JAXB lead. –  Blaise Doughan Apr 2 '11 at 20:18

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