Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my testing, I have noticed that iterating over tied arrays are at best half as fast as using the internal accessor methods (FETCH and FETCHSIZE). The following benchmark shows the issue:

{package Array;
    sub new {
        my $class = shift;
        tie my @array, $class, [@_];
        \@array
    }
    sub TIEARRAY {
        my ($class, $self) = @_;
        bless $self => $class;
    }
    sub FETCH     {$_[0][$_[1]]}
    sub FETCHSIZE {scalar @{$_[0]}}
}

use List::Util 'sum';
use Benchmark 'cmpthese';

for my $mag (map 10**$_ => 1 .. 5) {

    my $array = Array->new(1 .. $mag);
    my $tied  = tied(@$array);
    my $sum   = sum @$array;

    print "$mag: \n";
    cmpthese -2 => {
        tied => sub {
            my $x = 0;
            $x += $_ for @$array;
            $x == $sum or die $x
        },
        method => sub {
            my $x = 0;
            $x += $tied->FETCH($_) for 0 .. $tied->FETCHSIZE - 1;
            $x == $sum or die $x
        },
        method_while => sub {
            my $x = 0;
            my $i = 0; $x += $tied->FETCH($i++) while $i < $tied->FETCHSIZE;
            $x == $sum or die $x
        },
        method_while2 => sub {
            my $x = 0;
            my $i = 0;
            $x += tied(@$array)->FETCH($i++) 
                while $i < tied(@$array)->FETCHSIZE;
            $x == $sum or die $x
        },
        method_while3 => sub {
            my $x = 0;
            my $i = 0;
            while ($i < tied(@$array)->FETCHSIZE) {
                local *_ = \(tied(@$array)->FETCH($i++));
                $x += $_
            }
            $x == $sum or die $x
        },
    };
    print "\n";
}

With an array size of 1000, the benchmark returns:

1000: 
                Rate   tied method_while3 method_while2 method_while   method
tied           439/s     --          -40%          -51%         -61%     -79%
method_while3  728/s    66%            --          -19%         -35%     -65%
method_while2  900/s   105%           24%            --         -19%     -57%
method_while  1114/s   154%           53%           24%           --     -47%
method        2088/s   375%          187%          132%          87%       --

I have omitted the other runs because the size of the array does not produce a meaningful change in the relative speeds.

method is of course the fastest, because it does not check the size of the array on each iteration, however method_while and method_while2 seem to be operating on the tied array in the same manner as the for loop, yet even the slower method_while2 is twice as fast as the tied array.

Even adding localization of $_ and aliased assignment to method_while2 in method_while3 results in 66% faster execution than the tied array.

What extra work is happening in the for loop that is not happening in method_while3? Is there any way to improve the speed of the tied array?

share|improve this question
    
method would be even faster if Perl can optimize for 0 .. Y by not pre building an array of length Y. The optimizer is easily fooled if Y is not a simple scalar. Try my $size = $tied->FETCHSIZE - 1; $x += $tied->FETCH($_) for 0 .. $size and see if that performs better. –  Schwern Apr 4 '11 at 4:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In the benchmark, you do

... for @$array;

What if you had done

++$_ for @$array;

It would work. Tie magic wraps the value returned by FETCH into an lvalue when the value is returned in lvalue context. You can see this using Devel::Peek.

use Devel::Peek;
Dump( $array->[2] );

SV = PVLV(0x14b2234) at 0x187b374
  REFCNT = 1
  FLAGS = (TEMP,GMG,SMG,RMG)
  IV = 0
  NV = 0
  PV = 0
  MAGIC = 0x14d6274
    MG_VIRTUAL = &PL_vtbl_packelem
    MG_TYPE = PERL_MAGIC_tiedelem(p)
    MG_FLAGS = 0x02
      REFCOUNTED
    MG_OBJ = 0x14a7e5c
    SV = IV(0x14a7e58) at 0x14a7e5c
      REFCNT = 2
      FLAGS = (ROK)
      RV = 0x187b324
      SV = PVAV(0x187c37c) at 0x187b324
        REFCNT = 1
        FLAGS = (OBJECT)
        STASH = 0x14a842c       "Array"
        ARRAY = 0x0
        FILL = -1
        MAX = -1
        ARYLEN = 0x0
        FLAGS = (REAL)
    MG_LEN = 2
  TYPE = t
  TARGOFF = 0
  TARGLEN = 0
  TARG = 0x187b374

Wrapping the value returned by FETCH into an magical SV and processing that magic accounts for at least some of the difference.

tied_rvalue => sub {
    my $x = 0;
    $x += $_ for @$array;
    $x == $sum or die $x
},
tied_lvalue => sub {
    my $x = 0;
    $x += $array->[$_] for 0 .. $tied->FETCHSIZE - 1;
    $x == $sum or die $x
},

100:
                 Rate tied_rvalue method_while3 tied_lvalue method_while2 method_while method
tied_rvalue    3333/s          --          -33%        -36%          -50%         -58%   -77%
method_while3  4998/s         50%            --         -4%          -25%         -36%   -66%
tied_lvalue    5184/s         56%            4%          --          -23%         -34%   -65%
method_while2  6699/s        101%           34%         29%            --         -15%   -55%
method_while   7856/s        136%           57%         52%           17%           --   -47%
method        14747/s        342%          195%        184%          120%          88%     --
share|improve this answer
    
+1, Interesting, I hadn't considered that perl needs to apply magic to the variable to handle a possible later call to STORE –  Eric Strom Apr 4 '11 at 14:52

Every time you use the tied array, it has to look up the tied object, then look up the methods, then invoke them. With your other versions, you are doing some or all of that lookup either at compile time or once before the loop instead of on every access.

(The comparison of speeds between method and the other method_* versions is a good example of this, by the way: you're seeing the expense of doing that FETCHSIZE, even having the tied object already looked up. Now apply that cost to every single operation that touches the array.)

share|improve this answer
    
method_while3 is not precaching anything, and seems to do everything that the foreach loop does, but is still 66% faster. –  Eric Strom Apr 1 '11 at 20:06
    
I think it is doing some caching: with the explicit looping code, Perl's optimizer can see what's going on, and even given that the FETCHSIZE can't be lifted out of the loop (since it can't tell that you aren't accessing an external resource whose size might change dynamically), it can see that the tied call only needs to be done once. I don't think this happens for for @$array because the internals are hidden from both you and the optimizer. (Optimization in Perl 5 is... tricky, to put it mildly, so in many cases it doesn't even try.) BTW, this is highly Perl version dependent. –  geekosaur Apr 1 '11 at 20:19
    
I replaced the tied(@$array)->method with my $get_tied = sub {tied(@{$_[0]})}; and then $get_tied->($array)->method to thwart any sort of caching, and even adding those two additional subroutine calls to each iteration is still 25% faster than the for loop :( –  Eric Strom Apr 1 '11 at 20:38

It's worth noting that local is very slow which accounts for some of the performance loss in method_while3 vs the other method benchmarks. It is also doing a block entry and exit which has costs.

Even though method_while3 is programmatically equivalent to statement for x..y, perl can optimize the for loop better than you can. As a rule of thumb, the more code you do inside perl the faster your code will be.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.