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I have some content that contains a token string in the form

$string_text = '[widget_abc]This is some text. This is some text, etc...';

And I want to pull all the text after the first ']' character

So the returned value I'm looking for in this example is:

This is some text. This is some text, etc...
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5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted
preg_match("/^.+?\](.+)$/is" , $string_text, $match);
echo trim($match[1]);

Edit

As per author's request - added explanation:

preg_match(param1, param2, param3) is a function that allows you to match a single case scenario of a regular expression that you're looking for

param1 = "/^.+?](.+?)$/is"

"//" is what you put on the outside of your regular expression in param1

the i at the end represents case insensitive (it doesn't care if your letters are 'a' or 'A')

s - allows your script to go over multiple lines

^ - start the check from the beginning of the string

$ - go all the way to end of the string

. - represents any character

.+ - at least one or more characters of anything

.+? - at least one more more characters of anything until you reach

.+?] - at least one or more characters of anything until you reach ] (there is a backslash before ] because it represents something in regular expressions - look it up)

(.+)$ - capture everything after ] and store it as a seperate element in the array defined in param3

param2 = the string that you created.

I tried to simplify the explanations, I might be off, but I think I'm right for the most part.

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@Staffan: the text is coming from a text file via file_get_contents. I just skipped that part and went to the part where I had it in a variable. I should have specified... –  Scott B Apr 1 '11 at 20:41
    
@Staffan: The '; ends the string and ends the line of code. It doesn't get matched as it's not part of the string itself. –  Rocket Hazmat Apr 1 '11 at 20:48
    
+1 works a charm. If I may ask, how would I trim until the first non whitespace character in the string. Currently due to line breaks after the ']' token, my contents has whitespace leading the string... –  Scott B Apr 1 '11 at 21:01
    
@Scott B - added an explanation and added an update to the code to trim() –  Duniyadnd Apr 2 '11 at 15:15

The regex (?<=]).* will solve this problem if you can guarantee that there are no other square brackets on the line. In PHP the code will be:

if (preg_match('/(?<=\]).*/', $input, $group)) {
    $match = $group[0];
}

This will transform [widget_abc]This is some text. This is some text, etc... into This is some text. This is some text, etc.... It matches everything that follows the ].

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thanks for your answer. I think I could have been more clear in my question as you were in your answer :-) The text to replace is coming from a text file via file_get_contents. I've just taken the contents and made a string of it for the example. –  Scott B Apr 1 '11 at 20:43
    
The '; ends the string and ends the line of code. It doesn't get matched as it's not part of the string itself. –  Rocket Hazmat Apr 1 '11 at 20:48
    
@Scott B @Rocket ok, then I'll remove that part. –  Staffan Nöteberg Apr 1 '11 at 21:03
$output = preg_replace('/^[^\]]*\]/', '', $string_text);
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1) You need to add to your code that the '; in the end of the line should be removed as well -- according to the question. 2) Note also that you don't need to escape ] right after the negating ^ in a character class -- this isn't an error, however. –  Staffan Nöteberg Apr 1 '11 at 20:38
    
@Staffan Thank's for pointing, but about (1) the '; is the end of the PHP line, not the string's end (ie. it is part of PHP syntax on terminating string and line, not part of the string itself). About (2), it's a personal preference to avoid mix what/when I need/don't need escape. So, I prefer escape always (it's more guaranteed). –  Sony Santos Apr 1 '11 at 20:44
    
You're absolutely right about (1). And (2) is of course a matter of taste :-) –  Staffan Nöteberg Apr 1 '11 at 21:06
    
+1 Sony. It works great. Thanks for your answer. –  Scott B Apr 1 '11 at 21:17

Is there any particular reason why a regex is wanted here?

echo substr(strstr($string_text, ']'), 1);
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A regex is definitely overkill for this instance.

Here is a nice one-liner :

list(, $result) = explode(']', $inputText, 2);

It does the job and is way less expensive than using regular expressions.

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