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I've developed a method that allows me to pass in a table (string), array of columns (string) and array of values (object) through the parameters which I then use to create a parameterized query. Although it works fine the length of the code as well as the multiple for loops gave off a code smell, in particular I feel the method I use to insert a comma between the columns and values can be done a different and better way.

public static int Insert(string source, string[] column, object[] values)
{
    int rowsAffected = 0;
    try
    {
        using (SQLiteConnection conn = new SQLiteConnection(connectionString))
        {
            StringBuilder query = new StringBuilder();
            query.Append(" INSERT INTO ");
            query.Append(source);
            query.Append("(");

            for (int i = 0; i < column.Length; i++)
            {
                query.Append(column[i]);

                if (i < values.Length - 1)
                {
                    query.Append(",");
                }
            }

            query.Append(")");
            query.Append(" VALUES ");
            query.Append("(");

            for (int i = 0; i < values.Length; i++)
            {
                query.Append("@" + values[i].ToString());

                if (i < values.Length - 1)
                {
                    query.Append(",");
                }
            }

            query.Append(")");

            conn.Open();
            using (SQLiteCommand cmd = new SQLiteCommand(query.ToString(), conn))
            {
                for (int i = 0; i < values.Length; i++)
                {
                    cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@" + values[i].ToString(), values[i]);
                }
                rowsAffected = cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
            }
        }
        return rowsAffected;
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        MessageBox.Show(e.Message);
    }
    return 0;
}

I'm using the System.Data.SQLite library to interact with the database.

Thanks for any suggestions!

share|improve this question
1  
No, no, no, no, no. Concatenating strings is a terrible way to generate SQL and leaves you ripe for SQL injection. Does SQLite not support proper parameterized queries/commands? –  spender Apr 1 '11 at 21:19
1  
I am using parametrized queries, I use one loop to append the parameter to a string and then another to associate it with the correct value. All the examples I've seen (at least in Java) use this method.. –  Jamie Keeling Apr 1 '11 at 21:20
1  
so when columns[0] = 'ValidColumn) Values (1, 0); drop table xxx; --' you'll be fine? –  Austin Salonen Apr 1 '11 at 21:23
    
You're also taking input from a calling function and putting it as a column in the insert, which is where the SQL injection can happen. You should sanitize the values in both arrays being passed in here if you're going to use this method. –  Tridus Apr 1 '11 at 21:23
    
To sanitize it, you have to remove the control characters that SQLite recognizes, or escape them. It's not trivial to do it yourself, and if you're not sure the best way is to avoid it. You could make a function for the insert you want to do that already knows the columns and thus doesn't input them. You then paramaterize the values and you're protected. It's best to avoid sticking any external input directly into ANY SQL query whenever you can avoid it, except as a paramaterized value (like your params array, it's the columns that are the danger here). –  Tridus Apr 1 '11 at 21:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is my idiomatic way to append multiple values with a separator using StringBuilder:

string separator = ",";
for (int i = 0; i < column.Length; i++)
{
    query.Append(column[i]);
    query.Append(separator);
}
query.Length -= separator.Length;

This assumes you will have at least one value, and usually where I use it, it would be an error not to have at least one value (and it appears your scenario is like that).

It also appears that you have left this code wide open for SQL Injection.

You seem to be trying to use parameters, but I don't think you've done it correctly. The way I read the code, you are using the actual value of the parameters instead of their index. I would suggest this modification (this assumes your array of column names comes from a trusted source, but that your values do not):

        for (int i = 0; i < values.Length; i++)
        {
            query.Append("@" + i.ToString()); // instead of query.Append("@" + values[i].ToString());

            if (i < values.Length - 1)
            {
                query.Append(",");
            }
        }

        query.Append(")");

        conn.Open();
        using (SQLiteCommand cmd = new SQLiteCommand(query.ToString(), conn))
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < values.Length; i++)
            {
                cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@" + i.ToString(), values[i]); // instead of cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@" + values[i].ToString(), values[i]);
            }
            rowsAffected = cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I see now, I thought that the @ where the parameter is to be placed had to have the exact same name as the @ used when adding it via .AddWithValue(); , is that the case or am I mistaken? –  Jamie Keeling Apr 1 '11 at 21:41
1  
They do have to have the exact same name. You were using the value for that name (in both places), and the second example code I posted uses the index for that name (in both places). You would never want to use the parameter's value for its name. –  qes Apr 1 '11 at 21:44
    
That makes sense, I never thought to use the index instead of the value. Thankyou for clarifying it for me :) –  Jamie Keeling Apr 1 '11 at 21:52
1  
Why would anyone do that instead of string.Join(separator, columns)? –  sehe Apr 1 '11 at 22:20
    
@sehe: Personally, I figure if I'm already working with a StringBuilder, I'd rather just use that than use string.Join which will instantiate another StringBuilder and return a string (possibly interning it). Particularly in a generic data access method like this, it can be called many times with many different sets of columns. I feel this is a case where clarity does not outweigh prematurely optimizing. –  qes Apr 1 '11 at 22:38

The number of parameters and values has to always be the same for this to work, so you could eliminate a loop by using two StringBuilders. (Untested code, but it should get the point across)

            StringBuilder query = new StringBuilder();
            StringBuilder insertParams = new StringBuilder();
            query.Append(" INSERT INTO ");
            query.Append(source);
            query.Append("(");

            for (int i = 0; i < column.Length; i++)
            {

                if (i < values.Length - 1)
                {
                    query.Append(",");
                    insertParams.Append(",");
                }
                query.Append(column[i]);
                insertParams.Append("@" + values[i].ToString());
            }

            query.Append(")");
            query.Append(" VALUES ");
            query.Append("(");
            query.Append(insertValues.ToString());
            query.Append(")");

Since the lengths are the same you can build the parameter list and the value list at the same time, and then just stick the value list in the appropriate spot at the end of the loop. Net result should be faster. :)

share|improve this answer
    
I really appreciate your help, as you understood correctly the element counts for both the columns and values will always be the same so I'll make sure I incorporate your changes. –  Jamie Keeling Apr 1 '11 at 21:40

Here is another option. Really doing the same thing your original code does but breaking it up into smaller chunks and abstracting it into a class called InsertBuilder.

public class InsertBuilder
{
    public InsertBuilder()
    {
    }

    public InsertBuilder(string tableName, string[] columns, object[] values)
    {
        this.tableName = tableName;
        this.columns = columns;
        this.values = values;
    }

    private string tableName;
    public string TableName
    {
        get { return tableName; }
        set { tableName = value; }
    }

    private string[] columns;
    public string[] Columns
    {
        get { return columns; }
        set { columns = value; }
    }


    private object[] values;
    public object[] Values
    {
        get { return values; }
        set { values = value; }
    }

    public string InsertString
    {
        get
        {
            return CreateInsertString();
        }
    }

    public void Clear()
    {
        this.values = null;
        this.columns = null;
        this.tableName = null;
    }

    private string CreateInsertString()
    {
        if(columns.Length == 0) 
            throw new InvalidOperationException(
                "Columns must contain atleast one column"
                );

        if(values.Length == 0) 
            throw new InvalidOperationException(
                "Values must contain atleast one value"
                );

        if(columns.Length != values.Length)
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException(
                string.Format(
                    "Columns length {0} does not match Values length {1}",
                    columns.Length,
                    values.Length)
                    );
        }

        StringBuilder insertString = new StringBuilder();

        insertString.Append(CreateTableStatement());

        insertString.Append(CreateColumnsStatement());

        insertString.Append(CreateValuesStatement());

        return insertString.ToString();

    }

    private string CreateTableStatement()
    {
        return " INSERT INTO " + tableName;
    }

    private string CreateColumnsStatement()
    {
        StringBuilder columnsStatement = new StringBuilder();

        columnsStatement.Append("(");

        for(int i = 0;i < columnsStatement.Length;i++)
        {
            columnsStatement.Append(columnsStatement[i]);
            if(i < values.Length - 1) { columnsStatement.Append(","); }
        }

        columnsStatement.Append(")");

        return columnsStatement.ToString();
    }

    private string CreateValuesStatement()
    {
        StringBuilder valuesStatement = new StringBuilder();

        valuesStatement.Append("VALUES");
        valuesStatement.Append("(");

        for(int i = 0;i < values.Length;i++)
        {
            valuesStatement.Append("@" + values[i].ToString());

            if(i < values.Length - 1) { valuesStatement.Append(","); }
        }

        valuesStatement.Append(")");

        return valuesStatement.ToString();
    }

}

Then your original code looks something like this.

public static int Insert(string source, string[] column, object[] values)
{
    int rowsAffected = 0;
    try
    {
        using(SQLiteConnection conn = new SQLiteConnection(connectionString))
        {
            InsertBuilder insertBuilder = new InsertBuilder();
            insertBuilder.TableName = source;
            insertBuilder.Columns = column;
            insertBuilder.Values = values;

            using(SQLiteCommand cmd = new SQLiteCommand(insertBuilder.InsertString, conn))
            {
                for(int i = 0;i < values.Length;i++)
                {
                    cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@" + values[i].ToString(), values[i]);
                }

                conn.Open();

                rowsAffected = cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
            }
        }

        return rowsAffected;
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
        MessageBox.Show(e.Message);
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for making the effort with the helper class, it's a great idea and I'll consider implementing it if I get time to do so. –  Jamie Keeling Apr 1 '11 at 22:04
    
np, I see I forgot to add a check to make sure that tableName is not NULL or EMPTY. But you get the basic concept. Also I would add the optimization suggested by combining the column and values into one loop. –  Jim Scott Apr 1 '11 at 22:27
    
I think it's highly debatable whether combining the column and value concatenations into a single loop is an optimization or not. It doesn't seem to make the code and clearer (and for some might be more confusing) and I don't see any clear reason one would perform better than the other, in fact, I would assume using two StringBuilders would be less performant, just on the basis that it will almost certainly result in more resizing of internal arrays. –  qes Apr 1 '11 at 22:43

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