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I want to use str_replace or its similar alternative to replace some text in Javascript.

var text = "this is some sample text that i want to replace";
var new_text = replace_in_javascript("want", "dont want", text);
document.write("new_text");

should give

this is some sample text that i dont want to replace
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Strange nobody noticed that PHP's str_replace also accepts two arrays of the same length, where each string in the first array is replaced with the string in the second array at the same index. Please see stackoverflow.com/a/5069776/296430 for the only correct function I have found so far that mimics this exact behavior in javascript. –  Jules Colle Sep 2 '13 at 0:08

8 Answers 8

up vote 129 down vote accepted

You would use the replace method:

text = text.replace('old', 'new');

The first argument is what you're looking for, obviously. It can also accept regular expressions.

Just remember that it does not change the original string. It only returns the new value.

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1  
Thanks a lot for the 'it only returns and does not change'! That was what I was tearing my hair about for a long time till I came across the your comment... –  aditya menon Nov 26 '11 at 4:25
40  
string.replace('old','new') will only replace the first instance of 'old' in the string. using a regular expression with the 'g' flag like in realmag777's answer will replace all instances of the string. text = text.replace(/old/g, 'new') will replace all instances of 'old' –  Jazzerus May 31 '12 at 14:44
    
how about not case-sensitive? –  Mahan Jun 4 '12 at 11:17
2  
^ text.replace(/old/gi, 'new') will replace all instances of 'old' for 'new' not case-sensitive (e.g. 'OLD' and 'oLd' will be replaced as well) –  arnoudhgz Jan 16 at 15:53

More simply:

city_name=city_name.replace(/ /gi,'_');

Replaces all spaces with '_'!

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7  
this is a more accurate translation of what "str_replace" does (global). The chosen answer will only replace the first instance. –  rICh May 15 '12 at 21:53

You should write something like that :

var text = "this is some sample text that i want to replace";
var new_text = text.replace("want", "dont want");
document.write(new_text);
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that function replaces only one occurrence.. if you need to replace multiple occurrences you should try this function: http://phpjs.org/functions/str_replace:527

Not necessarily. see the Hans Kesting answer:

city_name = city_name.replace(/ /gi,'_');
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In JavaScript, you call the replace method on the String object, e.g. "this is some sample text that i want to replace".replace("want", "dont want"), which will return the replaced string.

var text = "this is some sample text that i want to replace";
var new_text = text.replace("want", "dont want"); // new_text now stores the replaced string, leaving the original untouched
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The code that others are giving you only replace one occurrence, while using regular expressions replaces them all (like @sorgit said). To replace all the "want" with "not want", us this code:

var text = "this is some sample text that i want to replace";
var new_text = text.replace(/want/g, "dont want");
document.write(new_text);

The variable "new_text" will result in being "this is some sample text that i dont want to replace".

To get a quick guide to regular expressions, go here:
http://www.cheatography.com/davechild/cheat-sheets/regular-expressions/
To learn more about str.replace(), go here:
https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/String/replace
Good luck!

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var new_text = text.replace("want", "dont want");
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hm.. Did you check replace() ?

Your code will look like this

var text = "this is some sample text that i want to replace";
var new_text = text.replace("want", "dont want");
document.write(new_text);
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