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What stackless programming languages are available?

I know of Stackless Python, but are there any other languages which do not rely on a C stack that can be embedded into other applications?

List of stackless programming languages:

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Why does it matter ? –  mP. Feb 16 '09 at 0:59
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@mP, performance, mainly. Eve Online is a famous example of using Stackless Python to boost their server performance. –  SCdF Feb 16 '09 at 1:12
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It also allows co-routines and infinite recursion. –  Jason Baker Feb 16 '09 at 2:26
    
stackless is performance? Look at Forth, widely acknowledged to be very quick, yet it only has a stack. –  gbjbaanb May 30 '09 at 18:15
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@gbjbaanb, stackless here refers to the reliance on the C stack in the implementation. Lua, for example, relies heavily on a stack for its FFI, but manages it in an allocated chunk of memory -- not in the call stack of the C implementation. –  Boojum Jul 2 '10 at 19:36
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6 Answers 6

There are many stackless languages that can be embedded into other applications. Including:

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Is smalltalk stackless, since it uses heap-allocated activation records? –  Peter Ajtai Jul 1 '10 at 1:19
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PyPy is another Python implementation that can be stackless.

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@Infamous Cow: Lua is at lua.org/about.html and, hopefully I'm remembering this correctly, was one of Christian Tismer's influences for initially developing Stackless Python. –  Van Gale Feb 16 '09 at 4:26
    
@vangale, being a register based VM is orthogonal to being 'stackless'. Register/stack refers to how instructions are encoded and expressions evaluated, while stack/stackless refers to how function call activation records are stored. –  Aaron Feb 16 '09 at 20:15
    
@Aaron: uhh, not sure why you're telling me this. My comment is just pointing Infamous Cow to Lua website if he wanted to check climatewarrior's answer (which has since been edited). I can't find any sources about Tismer so ignore that, besides the influence would be co-routines not stacklessness. –  Van Gale Feb 24 '09 at 16:05
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TCL 8.6 is also stackless.

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That feature is usually called NRE (Non recursive engine). Details can be found at: tclcommunityassociation.org/wub/proceedings/Proceedings-2008/… –  schlenk Dec 28 '11 at 19:10
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Stackless Python is not actually stackless. The original implementation was, but maintaining it was cumbersome and the benefits were negligible. The current implementation is as stackbound as standard C Python is.

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There was a talk at one of the major Python conferences about this - there are videos floating around the web somewhere. I'll comment again if I find it. –  new123456 Jul 6 '11 at 23:02
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Lisp or scheme?

There seem to be some references here: http://objectmix.com/compilers/706608-stackless-compilers.html

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Not really sure, but I seem to remember that Lua moved to a register based VM from the traditional stack based VM. Lua is very easy to embed.

I'm not to familiar with the details, though.

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