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I am trying to work out a data model where it will be important to retain history of certain contact information such as email addresses. How would I capture an end date for an email address without having an attribute in my Email table sitting as a Null waiting to be filled in?

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2 Answers 2

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The most robust solution is to use a third-party logging tool that will let you log inserts, updates, deletes and even selects. However, if you just want a simply tracking system, I would create a table for the current data and another for the history. You could then use a trigger to populate the history table whenever a insert or update is made.


Third-party auditing or database actvity monitoring applications for MySQL:

Idera Database Activity Monitoring

Hedgehog Enterprise

SQL Shark ( more of a monitoring tool but could be used to store changes )

DB Audit

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Do you know of any of these tools that you refer to that would work with MySQL so I can go chase down more information on them? –  swisscheese Apr 2 '11 at 1:28
    
@swisscheese - I've posted a couple. There also might be libraries out there that will manage the trigger creation to populate history tables. –  Thomas Apr 2 '11 at 3:54

How would I capture an end date for an email address without having an attribute in my Email table sitting as a Null waiting to be filled in?

The purist approach to capture the End Date would be to create a new table with the same key as the existing table and the End Date:

create table email_end_date(
   email     datatype  not null
  ,end_date  datatype  not null
  ,primary key(email)
  ,foreign key(email) references the_email_table(email)
);

That table would be in 6NF.

I would think twice before going down this road, and try to analyze the query patterns and the data distribution. If most queries need to check for the end_date, this approach will have a performance penalty. The more dense data you have (high % of emails that have end date) the worse this approach will be.

On the other hand, if none or few of your queries care about the end date, and those queries that do are specifically interested in the end dates, the above approach will often perform better. The more sparse data you have (low % of emails that have end date) the better this approach will perform.

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