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Using malloc and free, it is easy to allocate structures with extra data beyond the end. But how do I accomplish the same with new/delete?

I know I could use placement new syntax along with malloc for the allocation part, but will delete work properly and portably if I place an object in memory allocated by malloc?

What I want to accomplish is the same as the following example, but using new/delete instead of malloc/free, so that constructors/destructors will be called properly:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <cstring>
#include <iostream>

class Hamburger {
  int tastyness;
 public:
  char *GetMeat();
};

char *Hamburger::GetMeat() {
    return reinterpret_cast<char *>(this) + sizeof(Hamburger);
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
   Hamburger* hb;
   // Allocate a Hamburger with 4 extra bytes to store a string.
   hb = reinterpret_cast<Hamburger*>(malloc(sizeof(Hamburger) + 4));
   strcpy(hb->GetMeat(), "yum");
   std::cout << "hamburger is " << hb->GetMeat() << std::endl;
   free(hb);
}

Output: hamburger is yum

share|improve this question
    
I didn't know that. Awesome. –  karlphillip Apr 2 '11 at 2:00
    
It is awesome. int tastyness is usually called size_t size btw, just to make it obvious how useful this is. –  porgarmingduod Apr 2 '11 at 2:01
    
Why would you want to do this? What not include a char * member in the class? –  dlev Apr 2 '11 at 2:03
2  
@Chad, suppose that instead of always allocating 4 extra bytes, as in the example here, the value was determined by user input. This effectively allows for variable-sized objects. You can't do that with ordinary classes. You'd have to use multiple allocations, and then they're no longer one contiguous block. –  Rob Kennedy Apr 2 '11 at 2:17
1  
What Rob said. The use-case for this kind of stuff is to have a struct that acts as some kind of header for dynamic data that follows. –  porgarmingduod Apr 2 '11 at 2:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If I were you, I'd use placement new and an explicit destructor call instead of delete.

template< typename D, typename T >
D *get_aux_storage( T *x ) {
    return reinterpret_cast< D * >( x + 1 );
}

int main() {
    char const *hamburger_identity = "yum";
    void *hamburger_room = malloc( sizeof( Hamburger )
                                   + strlen( hamburger_identity ) + 1 );
    Hamburger *hamburger = new( hamburger_room ) Hamburger;
    strcpy( get_aux_storage< char >( hamburger ), hamburger_identity );
    cout << get_aux_storage< char const >( hamburger ) << '\n';

    hamburger->~Hamburger(); // explicit destructor call
    free( hamburger_room );
}

Of course, this kind of optimization should only be done after profiling has proven the need. (Will you really save memory this way? Will this make debugging harder?)

There might not be a significant technical difference, but to me new and delete signal that an object is being created and destroyed, even if the object is just a character. When you allocate an array of characters as a generic "block," it uses the array allocator (specially suited to arrays) and notionally constructs characters in it. Then you must use placement new to construct a new object on top of those characters, which is essentially object aliasing or double construction, followed by double destruction when you want to delete everything.

It's better to sidestep the C++ object model with malloc/free than to twist it to avoid dealing with data as objects.

Oh, an alternative is to use a custom operator new, but it can be a can of worms so I do not recommend it.

struct Hamburger {
  int tastyness;
public:
  char *GetMeat();
  static void *operator new( size_t size_of_bread, size_t size_of_meat )
      { return malloc( size_of_bread + size_of_meat ); }
  static void operator delete( void *ptr )
      { free( ptr ); }
};

int main() {
    char const *hamburger_identity = "yum";
    size_t meat_size = strlen( hamburger_identity ) + 1;
    Hamburger *hamburger = new( meat_size ) Hamburger;
    strcpy( hamburger->GetMeat(), hamburger_identity );
    cout << hamburger->GetMeat() << '\n';
}
share|improve this answer
    
Overloaded new/delete is exactly the same solution I just came up with! In fact, I was heading back here to post it as an answer and be on my happy way. I'm going to look around for information on why it can be a can of worms, but if you can elaborate that would be great. –  porgarmingduod Apr 2 '11 at 3:21
    
@porgarmingduod: Just general complication in the detailed rules behind lookup. For example, this disallows placement new on Hamburger. Since you are already restricting yourself to exactly one way of creating a Hamburger, and forbidding derived classes, it might be OK and simple as-is. –  Potatoswatter Apr 2 '11 at 3:34
    
Ah, I see what you are saying. It's not something you want to use unless you must. Btw, what do you mean by 'already forbidding derived classes'? I just implemented this in a simple class hierarchy, and it worked just fine as far as I can tell. The extra size was given a 0 default, so the derived classes that didn't need additional data could be allocated with a normal new call. –  porgarmingduod Apr 2 '11 at 3:42
    
@porgarmingduod: I see… be careful with the optional data, then. Having a hierarchy at all signals that you likely aren't trying to shave bytes from a class which is allocated millions of times. Are you sure you don't just want a std::string member of Hamburger? –  Potatoswatter Apr 2 '11 at 3:55

Urgh. Well, let's see. You definitely can't allocate with new/malloc and dispose with free/delete. You have to use matching pairs.

I suppose you could use "hp = new char[sizeof(Hamburger) + 4]" and "delete[]((char *) hp)", along with explicit constructor/destructor calls, if you really wanted to do this.

The only reason I can think why you'd want to do this would be you didn't have the Hamburger source -- i.e., it was a library class. Otherwise you'd just add a member to it! Can you explain why you'd want to use this idea?

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1  
As I mentioned, the entire point of using new/delete is to get the constructor/destructor calls. And as for the use case, it is for a class that stores a header followed by blobs of external data. The reason I want to store it as a class is because there are a bunch of other classes that follows the same pattern, but with specific data (i.e. data declared as members). Using the same base-class / header allows hashing functions to work on them uniformly. And so on. Trust me, there are use cases :) –  porgarmingduod Apr 2 '11 at 2:32
    
Ah, yes, the variable-size idea @Rob Kennedy mentions above. Yeah, I can see why this could be handy, then. Well, since you get to design the classes, just make sure they don't actually need a nontrivial destructor, and deallocate with char::delete[]. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Apr 2 '11 at 2:36

You can do this without resorting to malloc/free or undefined behavior (I'm not sure about the reinterpret_cast, but at least construction/destruction can be done just fine).

To allocate the memory you can just call the global operator new directly. After that you use good old placement new to construct the object there. You have to guard the ctor-call though, since the "placement delete" function that's called if the ctor fails will not release any memory but just do nothing (just as placement new does nothing).

To destroy the object afterwards you can (and may) call the destructor directly, and to release the memory you can call the global operator delete.

I think it should also be OK to just delete it as you would any normal object, since calling the destructor and global operator delete afterwards is just what the normal delete will do, but I'm not 100% sure.

Your example modified like that:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <cstring>
#include <iostream>

class Hamburger {
    int tastyness;
public:
    char *GetMeat();
};

char *Hamburger::GetMeat() {
    return reinterpret_cast<char *>(this) + sizeof(Hamburger);
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    Hamburger* hb;
    // Allocate space for a Hamburger with 4 extra bytes to store a string.
    void* space = operator new(sizeof(Hamburger) + 4);
    // Construct the burger in that space
    hb = new (space) Hamburger; // TODO: guard ctor call (release memory if ctor fails)
    strcpy(hb->GetMeat(), "yum"); // OK to call member function on burger now

    std::cout << "hamburger is " << hb->GetMeat() << std::endl;

    // To delete we have to do 2 things
    // 1) call the destructor
    hb->~Hamburger();
    // 2) deallocate the space
    operator delete(hb);
}
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There is another way that you could approach this if you have a reasonably constrained set of padding amounts. You could make a template class with the padding amount as the template parameter and then instantiate it with the set of possible padding amounts. So if, for example, you knew that you were only going to need padding of 16, 32, or 64 bytes, you could do it like this:

template <int Pad>
class Hamburger {
    int tastiness;
    char padding[Pad];
};

template class Hamburger<16>;
template class Hamburger<32>;
template class Hamburger<64>;
share|improve this answer
    
It's cute. But in this case, the padding amount is entirely dynamic. –  porgarmingduod Apr 2 '11 at 3:49

Is there any reason why the straightforward, easy and safe way is not applicable?

class Hamburger {
public:
    void Extend( const std::string& pExtension) {
        mContent += pExtension;
    }
    const std::string& GetMeat() ...

private:
    std::string mContent;
};

int main() {
    Hamburger hb;
    hb.Extend("yum");
    std::cout << "hamburger is " << hb.GetMeat() << std::endl;
}
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