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I have this complicated structure thingie:

#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct {
    int x;
    int y;
} SUB;

typedef struct {
    int a;
    SUB *z;
} STRUCT;

#define NUM  5

int main(void)
{
    STRUCT *example;
    int i;

    example = malloc(sizeof(STRUCT));

    example->z = malloc(NUM * sizeof(SUB));

    for(i = 0; i < NUM; ++i) {
        /* how do I access variable in certain struct of array of z's */
    }

    return 0;
}

example is dynamically allocated structure and z inside the example is dynamically allocated array of SUB structures.

How do I access certain variable in certain element of structure z?

I have been trying something like this: example->z[i].x but it doesnt seem to work.

At the moment I am using this shabby looking workaraound:

SUB *ptr = example->z;
int i;

for(i = 0; i < amount_of_z_structs; ++i) {
    /* do something with  'ptr->x' and 'ptr->y' */
    ptr += sizeof(SUB);
}
share|improve this question
    
I dont see any z in your code. Can you explain? –  Thrustmaster Apr 2 '11 at 2:45
    
What a mess. XrM, please clearify z and b. –  karlphillip Apr 2 '11 at 2:55
    
Someone else messed up with them already and then removed his answer too. –  XrM Apr 2 '11 at 2:56
    
After debugging it looks like the shorter version is incrementing only 8 bytes instead of correct 64 bytes. –  XrM Apr 2 '11 at 3:02
    
I think that you haven't told us the whole story. If you have properly allocated memory for both example and example->z, then example->z[i].x is a perfectly valid expression. –  Jefromi Apr 2 '11 at 3:10

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your problem isn't where you say it is. Your code as posted gives a compile error:

error: request for member ‘z’ in something not a structure or union

at the line

example.z = malloc(sizeof(STRUCT));

because you meant to write example->z, since example is a pointer to STRUCT, not a STRUCT.

From there on, you can access example->z[i].x exactly as you said. That syntax has always been fine.

For example:

/* your declarations here */

example = malloc(sizeof(STRUCT));
example->z = malloc(NUM * sizeof(SUB));

for(i = 0; i < NUM; ++i) {
    example->z[i].x = i;
    example->z[i].y = -i;
    printf("%d %d\n", example->z[i].x, example->z[i].y);
}

/* output:
0 0
1 -1
2 -2
3 -3
4 -4
*/
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah my mistake, I misswrote it in the example. My actual program is not giving any compiling errors even with -Wall option enable. Also valgrind gives me a clear papers. –  XrM Apr 2 '11 at 3:19
    
@Xrm: And my program gives exactly the output I'd expect. I don't know what your problem is - it's not in here. –  Jefromi Apr 2 '11 at 3:39
    
I compiled that with my windows Dev-C++ IDE and its printing rubbish. When I compiled the same code on my unix box with GCC 4.4, it works. Could it be possible that the old GCC version bundled with Dev-C++ is somehow broken. –  XrM Apr 2 '11 at 3:48
    
@XrM: That's... interesting. This code is so basic I have a hard time seeing what could go wrong. Try checking the values of example and example->z - if malloc somehow failed they should be NULL. –  Jefromi Apr 2 '11 at 4:49
    
Error checking is on place in actual code. No problems there. I must admit that I have very old version of Dev-C++ installed on my laptop. This might some kind of libc implementation error too. I updated to Code::Blocks with GCC 4.x and everything is fine. –  XrM Apr 2 '11 at 4:55

When you have pointers pointing to pointers you often end up running into precedence issues. I can't recall if this is one, but you might try (example->b)[i].x.

share|improve this answer
    
Same as example->z[i].x. Note: b changed to z. –  XrM Apr 2 '11 at 3:05

First of all, your second malloc is wrong; example is a pointer so this:

example.z = malloc(NUM * sizeof(SUB));

should be this:

example->z = malloc(NUM * sizeof(SUB));

Then in your loop you can say things like this:

example->z[i].x = i;
example->z[i].y = i;

You'll also want to have this near the top of your file:

#include <stdlib.h>
share|improve this answer
    
Already fixed . -> ->. 2. I know that that stdlib.h is needed. –  XrM Apr 2 '11 at 3:39

Try this:

int my_x = example[3].z[2].x;
  • The above code will first access the example[3] (the fourth element of the example array).
  • Once you get that particular element, its contents can be automatically access in the same way as you do with normal objects.
  • You then access z[2] from that element. Note that, example[3] is an element, so you could use a . to access its members; if its an array, you can access it as an array.
  • So till now, example[3].z[2] is one element of the SUB array inside one element of the example array.
  • Now you can simply access the member x using the way shown above.

typedef struct {
    int x;
    int y;
} SUB;

typedef struct {
    int a;
    SUB *z;
} STRUCT;

STRUCT *example;

int main() {
    example = malloc(sizeof(STRUCT)*10); //array of 10;
    int i=0,j=0;
    for (;i<10;i++){
        example[i].a = i;
        example[i].z = malloc(sizeof(SUB)*5);
        for (j=0; j<5; j++)
            example[i].z[j].x = example[i].z[j].y = j;
    }
    //access example[3] and access z[2] inside it. And finally access 'x'
    int my_x = example[3].z[2].x;
    printf("%d",my_x);

    for (i=0;i<10;i++){
        printf("%d |\n",example[i].a);
        //example[i].z = malloc(sizeof(SUB)*5);
        for (j=0; j<5; j++)
            printf("%d %d\n",example[i].z[j].x,example[i].z[j].y);
        free(example[i].z);
    }
    free(example);
}

share|improve this answer
    
Not a particularly useful answer. If everything has been allocated to make this work, example->z[2].x would work too, being the same as example[0].z[2].x. –  Jefromi Apr 2 '11 at 3:12
    
I never denied what you said. He isnt wrong with the syntax. Only with the logical way. :-) –  Thrustmaster Apr 2 '11 at 3:31
    
@Thrustmaster: There's not necessarily anything wrong with the logic either. Pointers don't always point to arrays - they could be single objects too. –  Jefromi Apr 2 '11 at 3:45
    
I didnt deny this either. I dont get your point. Please explain. –  Thrustmaster Apr 2 '11 at 3:50
    
My point is that the bulk of your answer is suggesting that the OP access this variable as an array, when it actually isn't. It doesn't address whatever the real problem is. –  Jefromi Apr 2 '11 at 4:47

In the 'shabby workaround', you wrote:

SUB *ptr = example->z;
int i;

for(i = 0; i < amount_of_z_structs; ++i) {
    /* do something with  'ptr->x' and 'ptr->y' */
    ptr += sizeof(SUB);
}

The problem here is that C scales pointers by the size of the object pointed to, so when you add 1 to a SUB pointer, the value is advanced by sizeof(SUB). So, you simply need:

SUB *ptr = example->z;
int i;

for (i = 0; i < NUM; ++i) {
    ptr->x = ptr->y = 0;
    ptr++;
}

Of course, as others have said, you can also do (assuming C99):

for (int i = 0; i < NUM; ++i)
    example->z[i].x = example->z[i].y = 0;
share|improve this answer
#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<conio.h>

#define NUM 5

typedef struct
{
    int x;
    int y;
}SUB;

typedef struct
{
    int a;
    SUB* z;
}STRUCT;

void main(void)
{
    clrscr();
    printf("Sample problem..\n\n");

    STRUCT* example;
    int i;

    example = (STRUCT*)malloc(sizeof(STRUCT));
    example->z = (SUB*)malloc(NUM * sizeof(SUB));

    for(i = 0; i < NUM; i++)
    {
        example->z[i].x = i +1;
        example->z[i].y = (example->z[i].x)+1;
        printf("i = %d: x:%d y:%d\n", i, example->z[i].x, example->z[i].y);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
probably you just did not access the structure well... –  Jenn Eve Apr 2 '11 at 9:18

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