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I have never had to use threads much - only a few occasions. But today, I was bored, and wanted to play with them... and try build an understanding. It looks like BackgroundWorkerThread is a good thing... So, I tried to make a console app that simply writes 'Tick' ever 5 seconds, 5 times. And this is what I came up with:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            BackgroundWorker bw = new BackgroundWorker();

            AlarmClock ac = new AlarmClock(5);
            bw.DoWork += ac.StartAlarm;
            bw.RunWorkerAsync(5);

            bool run = true;

            while(run)
            {
                run = bw.IsBusy;  
            }
            Console.WriteLine("Finished!!");
            Console.WriteLine("Press a key...");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }

    public class AlarmClock
    {
        private int noOfTicks;

        public AlarmClock (int noOfTicks)
        {
            this.noOfTicks = noOfTicks;
        }

        public void StartAlarm(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
        {
            DateTime start = DateTime.Now;
            Console.WriteLine("Alarm set to tick ever 5 seconds.");
            int ticks = 0;
            bool runMe = true;

            while (runMe)
            {
                if (DateTime.Now.Second % 5 == 0)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Tick..");
                    ticks++;
                    Thread.Sleep(1000);
                }
                runMe = ticks < noOfTicks;
            }
            Console.WriteLine("Aboring thread.");
        }

    }
}

But it seems messy. Can anyone assist me to show me how it SHOULD be done?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As answered above, for the described case Timer is more efficient than BackgroundWorker. But if your goal is to learn how to work with BackgroundWorker class, you can do something like this:

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var worker = new BackgroundWorker {WorkerReportsProgress = true};
        worker.DoWork += DoWork;
        worker.ProgressChanged += ReportProgress;
        worker.RunWorkerAsync(5);

        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    private static void DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
        int count = (int) e.Argument;
        for (int i = 1; i <= count; i++)
        {
            (sender as BackgroundWorker).ReportProgress(i);
            Thread.Sleep(5000); // Do your work
        }
    }

    private static void ReportProgress(object sender, ProgressChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Tick " + e.ProgressPercentage);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

or you simply use System.Threading.Timer

System.Threading.Timer aTimer = new System.Threading.Timer(OnTimedEvent, null, 5000, 5000);

private static void OnTimedEvent(Object stateInfo)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Hi");
}

More info on how to prevent the timer from restarting, restart it immediately, disable periodic signaling at this link.

To find out the differences between the different timers in .NET, visit this link.

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For what you're doing you'd want to use a timer

 public static void Main()
 {
     System.Timers.Timer aTimer = new System.Timers.Timer();
     aTimer.Elapsed+=new ElapsedEventHandler(OnTimedEvent);
     // Set the Interval to 5 seconds.
     aTimer.Interval=5000;
     aTimer.Enabled=true;

     Console.WriteLine("Press \'q\' to quit the sample.");
     while(Console.Read()!='q');
 }

 // Specify what you want to happen when the Elapsed event is raised.
 private static void OnTimedEvent(object source, ElapsedEventArgs e)
 {
     Console.WriteLine("Hello World!");
 }
share|improve this answer

That actually looks pretty good. Not counting your alarm clock class, since it just represents worker code that just does whatever you need done, the only thing you are doing with the background worker is adding an event, calling a method, and waiting for IsBusy to be false. Nothing messy there.

There are a few things you could improve though. First, would be that your while loop doesn't need a run variable that just gets set to IsBusy. Just check IsBusy directly. Also, you should be putting some kind of sleep in the loop to keep from over-taxing the CPU uselessly. Event a rest of 10 milliseconds between checks will help a lot. Second would be a suggestion, for a more real-world program than this, to use the RunWorkerCompleted event to alert when it's done, instead of constantly checking it. This leads to much simpler and more flexible code.

One last thing, especially for GUI program is to understand the ProgressChanged event. Setting this in your work method, and accessing it from your GUI allows you to easily update the interface with the worker thread's progress. Remember that you can never update the GUI from any thread except the GUI thread.

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