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EDIT #1 So I think my solution is to pass the class around through the functions, si then I have to get the size values in main and pass them into the class. So how would I create a multidimensional array within the class based on 2 int values? This is what I have, but I get the error "`ii' cannot appear in a constant-expression "

class tempHolder{
  public: 
  bool C1[col1][row1];

  tempHolder(){
  }

  tempHolder(int i, int ii){              
  int* C1 = new bool[i][ii];
  }
}

So my program has a multidimensional array, but I'm using global variables (which I know is bad style) to declare the size of the array. The problem is that I also pass this array to functions and I use it in a class, like the code below...

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
const int row1 = 12;
const int col1 = 32;
class tempHolder{
      public: 
      bool C1[col1][row1];
      void operator=(bool C2[col1][row1]){
                for(int i=0;i<row1;i++)
                  for(int ii=0;ii<col1;ii++)
                    C1[i][ii] = C2[i][ii];
      }
};
void printTable(bool CC[][row1], int, bool);

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    col1=5; //error
    bool C1[col1][row1];

So I want to be able to change the values of row1 and col1 right at the beginning of main, which would then change the array size for the entire program. If I declare the global variables like above, then the program compiles, but since they are constants, I won't be able to change them. I can't use a #define because those are not changeable at all. So what can I do to resize the array for the entire program?

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You can use dynamic allocation with new and delete to change the size of your array. Or better yet, just use a std::vector for your multidimensional array instead of raw arrays. –  greatwolf Apr 2 '11 at 3:53

2 Answers 2

You cannot simply change the size of the array by simply changing the dimensions at runtime - you need to allocate the memory dynamically with new. Best is usually to use the STL containers - they have their length property built in and can be easily resized.

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The size of the arrays is set before main begins, when the program is compiled.

So, even if col1 only changes once at startup, it still must be a proper non-const variable.

You likely want std::vector to implement a variable-sized array. Note that vector<bool> is a specially-optimized class which uses one bit, not one byte, per Boolean value. You might try using vector<char> instead if there are problems or performance is poor.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int row1 = 12;
int col1 = 32;

typedef vector< vector< bool > > bit_array_2d;

class tempHolder{
      public: 
      bit_array_2d C1;
      void operator=( bit_array_2d const &C2 ){
          C1 = C2;
      }
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    col1=5; // OK
    bit_array_2d C1( col1, vector< bool >( row1 ) );

A more advanced approach, if there are only a few potential sizes to select from, is to use template-parameterized C arrays.

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