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When an Attribute fires, can I test if was set on a Controller or an Action?

Behavior I want is: use Action attribute if exists, else use Controller attribute. Something like this:

public class TestAttribute : FilterAttribute, IAuthorizationFilter
{
    public TestAttribute(string optionalParam = "") { /*...*/ }

    public void OnAuthorization(AuthorizationContext filterContext)
    {
        bool isClassAttribute; // = ????

        bool hasActionAttribute = filterContext.ActionDescriptor.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(TestAttribute ), false).Length > 0;

        if (isClassAttribute && hasActionAttribute)
            return; // handle in Action attribute
        else
            ; // do stuff with optionalParam...
    }
}

[TestAttribute]
public class TestClass 
{    
    [TestAttribute(optionalParam:"foo"]
    public ActionResult TestMethod() { return null; }    
}

I could do this with the Order property, but don't want to have to set it every time (or get funky).

Edit / Solution

OK, found a solution to my issue (but not the question) - setting the Attribute base parameter AllowMultiple=false means last instance of the same filter type is allowed, and all others are discarded (and Controller attributes run first(?) so should be good to go...).

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Method | AttributeTargets.Class, Inherited = true, AllowMultiple = false)]
public class TestAttribute : FilterAttribute, IAuthorizationFilter
{
    public TestAttribute(string optionalParam = "") { /*...*/ }

    public void OnAuthorization(AuthorizationContext filterContext)
    {
        // this should be the Action attribute (if exists), else the Controller attribute...
    }
}

Anyway I asked a slightly different question, so will still give points for answer ;)

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1 Answer 1

I believe the item executes on each method call anyway but you can reference for instance:

public void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext) { }
..
..

string controllerName = filterContext.Controller.GetType().Name;
//either or:
string actionMethodName = filterContext.ActionDescriptor.ActionName;
string actionMethodName = filterContext.RouteData.Values["action"].ToString();

If your actionMethodName is null, then it's potentially from your controller - although like I said they may only get called when an action method is called as it is (not 100% sure on this one though test out the above code and that should answer your question)

Hope it helps : )

share|improve this answer
    
Thnaks Adam, but the ActionName property exists for Contoller level attributes too. –  Seba Illingworth Apr 6 '11 at 21:27

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