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When I was introduced to the singleton pattern, this was the way to implement it:

public class MySingleton
{
    private MyStingleton instance;

    private MySingleton()
    {
        //constructor
    }

    public static MySingleton GetInstance()
    {
        if(instance== null)
        {
            instance = new MySingleton();    
        }
        return instance;
    }
}

What is the advantage doing it this way, compared to this:

public class MySingleton
{
    public static readonly MyStingleton Instance = new MySingleton();

    private MySingleton()
    {
        //constructor
    }

}
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2  
How about "avoid global data, untestable designs, hidden dependencies, and coupling every class in your application to a Singleton"? Look into Dependency Injection instead. –  TrueWill Apr 2 '11 at 6:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The first example is not thread safe. You may take a look at the following article.

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Both of those singleton implementations are unsafe, and I see no benefit from using the second one over the first one.

You should probably check out this link: http://www.yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/singleton.html where a number of singleton implementations is listed, for each one is explained why they are good or bad.

The final correct singleton is this:

public sealed class Singleton
{
    Singleton()
    {
    }

    public static Singleton Instance
    {
        get
        {
            return Nested.instance;
        }
    }

    class Nested
    {
        // Explicit static constructor to tell C# compiler
        // not to mark type as beforefieldinit
        static Nested()
        {
        }

        internal static readonly Singleton instance = new Singleton();
    }
}
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2  
Please note that there's a link at the top to an updated version of the article, with an extra pattern using Lazy<T>. –  Jon Skeet Apr 2 '11 at 6:58
    
What is not thread-safe about the second one? It looks good... –  Petar Minchev Apr 2 '11 at 6:59
    
Hey Jon, I missed that link myself, that's a really nice feature in .NET4.0. Always fun to learn more by answering questions :). @Petar ah it might be yes, maybe I confused it with instance = null instead of instance = new(..) which would be unsafe. –  Roy T. Apr 2 '11 at 7:01

In the first one, the instance is not created until you call the GetInstance static method. you create the instance just when you call this method.

In the second one the instance is a constant, is conceptually different.

used to use the first one, is the pattern I have always seen, and you can control when the instance is created.

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