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I have a collection of periods [FromDate, ToDate].

I would know whether there is any overlap between a given period and the periods in the collection.

I've already started with this:

 // periodToCheck is the given item
 bool conflict = Periods.Any(p => ((p.FromDate >= periodToCheck.fromDate && 
                                    p.FromDate <= periodToCheck.toDate)
                                  ||
                                   (p.ToDate >= periodToCheck.fromDate && 
                                    p.ToDate <= periodToCheck.toDate))
                             );

The problem that it does not cover all the situation, for example:

[2010.1.1], [2010.1.31]
[2010.1.5], [2010.1.6] // Is valid in the query in spite of it is not valid 
                       // (because there is intersection).

And if I discuss more situation I think the query will become more complicated.

I wonder if you could help me with the simplest valid way.

Regards.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Approach it this way instead: There is no intersaction if the check date's todate < the from date, or the check date's fromdate > the to date. This is assuming check.from <= check.to.

Periods.Any(p => !(check.ToDate < p.FromDate || check.FromDate > p.ToDate));

or (after unwrapping the negative):

Periods.Any(p => check.ToDate >= p.FromDate && check.FromDate <= p.ToDate));
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2  
+1 for using =>, <=, and >= all in one expression –  Gabe Apr 2 '11 at 8:42
    
@Gabe, +1. :-) If this code is embedded in an ASP.NET file, and it is commented out with <!-- -->, then we'll have <!-- and --> in the same expression also! Unfortunately I can't mix C/C++ code, otherwise I can also put in "->"... –  Stephen Chung Apr 2 '11 at 8:45
1  
The -> operator in C# does the same thing as it does in C/C++ (see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/s8bz4d5h(v=VS.80).aspx). Also, don't forget the --> and <-- operators (see blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2010/04/01/…)! –  Gabe Apr 2 '11 at 8:54
    
Thanks. It's perfect. –  Homam Apr 2 '11 at 9:01
    
@Gabe, I know, but it needs unmanaged (unsafe) code to use ->... But that link on --> and <-- are just totally wild! +1 –  Stephen Chung Apr 2 '11 at 9:03

If FromDate <= ToDate always holds true for your Period objects, you can define a helper extension method OverlapsWith as follows:

public static bool OverlapsWith(this Period a, Period b)
{
    return !(b.ToDate <= a.FromDate || a.ToDate <= b.FromDate);
}

To illustrate what's going on, let's look at the two cases where there is no overlap between a and b:

//                         a
//                |-----------------|
//   |--------|                          |-----------|
//       b1                                    b2

You can check the above condition against this diagram. Since the diagram shows the cases where no overlap occurs, but the method really ought to test for overlap, the condition needs to be negated. It could be simplified to the following:

           b.ToDate > a.FromDate && a.ToDate > b.FromDate

When you use this method in a LINQ query, it turns out very easy to understand:

    Periods.Any(period => period.OverlapsWith(periodToCheck))
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, and this is exactly what Stephen Chung has written. check.ToDate >= p.FromDate && check.FromDate <= p.ToDate –  Homam Apr 2 '11 at 9:31
    
@Homam, I'm aware of that, but I didn't just want to show a correct formula; I also wanted to explain the thinking behind it by a visual means. Second, I wanted to demonstrate that you get an easy-to-understand LINQ query with some expressive helper methods. –  stakx Apr 2 '11 at 18:55
    
Thank you very much. I really appreciate that. –  Homam Apr 2 '11 at 19:19

You may find the following article useful and especially the TimePeriodIntersector class.

Sample excerpt:

public void TimePeriodIntersectorSample()
{
    TimePeriodCollection periods = new TimePeriodCollection();

    periods.Add( new TimeRange( new DateTime( 2011, 3, 01 ), new DateTime( 2011, 3, 10 ) ) );
    periods.Add( new TimeRange( new DateTime( 2011, 3, 05 ), new DateTime( 2011, 3, 15 ) ) );
    periods.Add( new TimeRange( new DateTime( 2011, 3, 12 ), new DateTime( 2011, 3, 18 ) ) );

    periods.Add( new TimeRange( new DateTime( 2011, 3, 20 ), new DateTime( 2011, 3, 24 ) ) );
    periods.Add( new TimeRange( new DateTime( 2011, 3, 22 ), new DateTime( 2011, 3, 28 ) ) );
    periods.Add( new TimeRange( new DateTime( 2011, 3, 24 ), new DateTime( 2011, 3, 26 ) ) );

    TimePeriodIntersector<TimeRange> periodIntersector = 
                    new TimePeriodIntersector<TimeRange>();
    ITimePeriodCollection intersectedPeriods = periodIntersector.IntersectPeriods( periods );

    foreach ( ITimePeriod intersectedPeriod in intersectedPeriods )
    {
        Console.WriteLine( "Intersected Period: " + intersectedPeriod );
    }
    // > Intersected Period: 05.03.2011 - 10.03.2011 | 5.00:00
    // > Intersected Period: 12.03.2011 - 15.03.2011 | 3.00:00
    // > Intersected Period: 22.03.2011 - 26.03.2011 | 4.00:00
} // TimePeriodIntersectorSample
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Thanks, I'll have a look at it. –  Homam Apr 2 '11 at 9:07

Do 2 periods having common date, say ToDate for period 1 and FromDate of period 2 are the same, count as in intersection ?

If yes then a little modification to your query to simply check the dates of a period if are within the checked period separately as if one of the dates falls inside a period then there is intersection:

bool conflict = Periods.Any(p => ((p.FromDate >= periodToCheck.fromDate && 
                                    p.ToDate <= periodToCheck.fromDate)
                                  ||
                                   (p.FromDate >= periodToCheck.toDate && 
                                    p.ToDate <= periodToCheck.toDate))
                             );
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