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This is very simple function to build binnary tree.

I use Build_tree(first_TR, A); And it prints "added as first, added as first, added as first, added as first, added as first, added as first, added as first, added as first, added as first, added as first,".

That means first_TR == 0. Why? I also tried Build_tree(&first_TR, A); Doesn't work :(

typedef struct SElementBST {
    struct SElementBST  *left, *right; /* wskaźnik na kolejny element listy */
    unsigned slowo[DlugoscSlow+1]; /* przechowywana wartość */
}   TBST;

TBST *first_TR = 0; 

void Build_tree(TBST *first, unsigned char array[IloscSlow][DlugoscSlow+1])
{

    int i,k,m;
    TBST *tmp, *parent;

    for(i=0;i<IloscSlow;i++)
    {

        if(!first_TR)   
        {
            first = (TBST*) malloc(sizeof(TBST));
            first -> left = 0;
            first -> right = 0;
            printf("added as first, ");
            for(k=0;k<DlugoscSlow+1;k++)
                    first -> slowo[k] = array[i][k];
        } 
        else
        {
            tmp = first;

            while(tmp != 0)
            {
                k = 0;
                parent = tmp;

                while ((tmp->slowo[k] == array[i][k]) && (k<DlugoscSlow-1))
                               k++;

                if(tmp->slowo[k] < array[i][k]) tmp = tmp -> right;
                else tmp = tmp -> left;

            }

            tmp = (TBST*) malloc(sizeof(TBST));
            tmp -> left = 0;
            tmp -> right = 0;

            for(m=0;m<DlugoscSlow+1;m++)
                tmp-> slowo[m] = array[i][m];

            if(parent->slowo[k] < array[i][k]) parent -> right = tmp;
            else parent -> left = tmp;
        }
    }
}
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2  
Your formatting is inconsistent. It doesn't have to be perfect, but should look somewhat like the output of a pretty-printer. Also, almost everyone here (and almost every programmer) understands English. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said about any other language, so you should keep variables and comments in that language. –  phihag Apr 2 '11 at 10:09
    
If what you are building is a BST, why does your question's title mention linked list? –  MAK Apr 2 '11 at 11:47
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1 Answer 1

If you have this:

void something(type *p) {
  p = somethingelse;
}

int main() {
  type *a = ...;
  something(a);
}

The assignment in function something will not change the value of a in the caller (main here). The pointer is passed by value, meaning that a copy of the pointer's value is given to function something.

If you want to be able to change what a points to in the caller, you need to pass a pointer to pointer.

void something(type **p) {
 *p = somethingelse;
}

int main() {
 type *a;
 something(&a);
}

You're not changing first_TR anywhere in that code. So it's keeping it's null value all along.

Either you don't need first_TR and your code should be something like:

if(!first)  
{
 first = malloc(sizeof(TBST));
 ...
}

Or you do need it, and you could do:

if(!first_TR)  
{
 first = malloc(sizeof(TBST));
 ...
 first_TR = first;
}

(You don't need to cast the result of malloc in C.)

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2  
In fact, you even shouldn't cast malloc(). –  hynek Apr 2 '11 at 10:14
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