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I'm testing the following code to populate a dictionary recursively. However the type inference does not seem to recognize the dictionary type. I've tried using a type annotation but that did not seem to help.

Are there some restrictions on the use of dictionaries in a recursive routine. Do I need to make the dictionary mutable since I expect to change it during iterations.

open System
open System.Collections.Generic

////dictionary recursion test

let pop_dict tlist = 
   // let rec inner tlist acc ddict:Dictionary<string,int> =
    let rec inner tlist acc ddict =
       match tlist with 
            | [] ->  ddict.Add ("dummykey", acc)                             
            | x::xs  -> inner xs  (x::acc) ddict
    let  ddict = Dictionary<string,int>()
    inner tlist [] ddict 


// Main Entry Point
let main() =

    let tlist = [1;2;3;4]
    let d = pop_dict tlist

main()
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You want a mutable dictionary with one key ("dummykey") that contains the list you passed in? let dic = Dictionary<string,int list>(); dic.add("dummykey", [1,2,3,4]) –  Robert Jeppesen Apr 2 '11 at 22:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

First of all, your types don't match up.

You're trying to add an int list (which is what acc is) to a dictionary that is supposed to contain ints.

Apart from that, however, the reason that the compiler cannot infer the type of ddict is. Remember, when the type checker determines types for the function, it doesn't look at what it gets called with later. It only has the following information available:

let rec inner tlist acc ddict =
   match tlist with 
        | [] -> ddict.Add ("dummykey", acc)                             
        | x::xs  -> inner xs  (x::acc) ddict

That means, that the only information it knows about ddict when it compiles the function, is that it has a method named Add, which string * 'a list -> ?.

To fix it, change

let rec inner tlist acc ddict =

to

let rec inner tlist acc (ddict:Dictionary<string,int>) =

You still have the trouble with the mismatching types on the dictionary, however, so you probably want it to be Dictionary<string, int list>, if you plan on storing int lists in it.

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Good explanation - getting/checking the type checking rules clear is maybe the the trickiest part of learning F# - however it does focus the mind and (hopefully) improves our coding skills. –  BrendanC Apr 2 '11 at 13:14

is that what you wanted?

let pop_dict tlist = 
    let rec inner tlist acc (ddict:Dictionary<string,int list>) =
       match tlist with 
            | [] ->  ddict.Add ("dummykey", acc)                             
            | x::xs  -> inner xs  (x::acc) ddict
    let  ddict = Dictionary<string,int list>()
    inner tlist [] ddict 


// Main Entry Point
let main() =

    let tlist = [1;2;3;4]
    let d = pop_dict tlist
    ()
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