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I am wanting to know if it's possible to instantiate a null object inside of an extension method for that object.

Example:

Simple class

public class TestClass
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
}

Extension Method

public static class ExtensionMethods
{
    public static void GetTestClass(this TestClass tc, string name)
    {
        using (SqlConnection cn = new SqlConnection(myConnectionString))
        using (SqlCommand cmd = cn.CreateCommand())
        {
             cmd.CommandText= "SELECT Name, Age FROM Person WHERE Name = @Name";
             cn.Open();

             cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Name", name);

             using (SqlDataReader dr = cmd.ExecuteReader())
             {
                 if (dr.Read())
                 {
                     tc = new TestClass();
                     tc.Name = name;
                     tc.Age = int.Parse(dr["Age"]);
                 }
             }
        }
    }
}

The user is going to give me a name, and I want to validate that the name exists by doing this...

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    TestClass tc = null;
    tc.GetTestClass("Some Name");

    if (tc == null)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Not Found");
    }

    Console.Read();
}

Is this possible? My current code leaves the original object as null. I didn't know if I was doing something wrong of it this was just not possible.

Thanks.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No - this code doesn't make sense:

TestClass tc = null;
tc.GetTestClass("Some Name");

This could looks like it should throw a NullReferenceException...

OK - so it doesn't (see example on http://www.pvle.be/2008/11/extension-methods-and-null-objects/) but it also doesn't pass tc in by ref either... so it won't update tc for you


MSDN on extensions says:

In general, we recommend that you implement extension methods sparingly and only when you have to. Whenever possible, client code that must extend an existing type should do so by creating a new type derived from the existing type.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb383977.aspx


IMO it would be better to implement what you are looking for as some sort of Factory method.

Or you could use something like:

   TestClass tc = new TestClass();
   if (tc.TryFillFrom("Some Name"))
   {
       // do stuff
   }
   else
   {
       // handle missing error
   }

or you could use a FillFrom method which throws some NotFoundException

share|improve this answer
    
Extension methods can be called on null objects, without receiving a NullReferenceException –  Eclipsed4utoo Apr 2 '11 at 13:27
    
I haven't tested it myself, but I'm pretty sure that the code works (the this ... tc parameter is just a normal parameter that only syntactically looks like the LHS of a method invocation); it just doesn't do what the OP expects. –  Marcelo Cantos Apr 2 '11 at 13:29
    
@eclipsed - agreed and fixed - sorry I typed too quick for my own good. Have gone back and corrected my mistake - thanks! (Regardless, I still don't think the proposed extension method is good :) –  Stuart Apr 2 '11 at 13:36
    
Thanks for the help. I am going to go with throwing a custom exception if it's not found. –  Eclipsed4utoo Apr 2 '11 at 13:45

I'm surprised that everyone is offering static method solutions. If this is how your class is always instantiated, use a constructor. That's what they're for. If it's not the only way then create an empty constructor and overload it to pass in your parameters when you DO want it instantiated that way. I would prefer to have the two constructors like this

public class TestClass
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }

    public TestClass() { }

    public TestClass(string name)
    {
        using (SqlConnection cn = new SqlConnection(myConnectionString))
        using (SqlCommand cmd = cn.CreateCommand())
        {
             cmd.CommandText= "SELECT Name, Age FROM Person WHERE Name = @Name";
             cn.Open();

             cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Name", name);

             using (SqlDataReader dr = cmd.ExecuteReader())
             {
                 if (dr.Read())
                 {
                     Name = name;
                     Age = int.Parse(dr["Age"]);
                 }
             }
        }
    }
}

To me, this is more straight forward. Extension methods should be used when you don't have access to a class's code to add a method of your own.

share|improve this answer
    
While I do have access to the class's code, I was told not to put the database access code in the class. I would have done it this way, but I wasn't allowed. So, personally, I like using extension methods over the Factory class with nothing but static methods. –  Eclipsed4utoo Apr 2 '11 at 17:50
    
That would be the same as not having access to the code. I just meant if you can't modify the class. Since you're instantiating a class, extension methods aren't preferred and I'd personally use a factory instead. Just because extension methods exist, don't mean they're the cure all. –  jlafay Apr 2 '11 at 18:25

No, that is not possible.

It's only a copy of the reference from the variable that is sent to the method, so you can't change the contents of the variable.

It wouldn't be intuitive to use an extension method like that, anyway. Eventhough you can call an extension method on a null reference, your method would rely on it.

Just use a regular static method instead, and return null if the record is not found:

TestClass tc = TestClass.GetTestClass("Some Name");
share|improve this answer

This cannot work, you need a method that returns an object. Assigning the this argument in an extension method won't do what you want it to do, it isn't going to modify the tc variable.

You might be falling victim to the trappings of IntelliSense here, yes it is going to show you the GetTestClass() method. But the code you'd have to write doesn't pass the right side code review door:

  tc = tc.GetTestClass("some name");

Clearly you want a static factory method here:

  tc = Mumble.CreateTest("some name");
share|improve this answer

It is possible, but when you assign to tc, the assignment only affects the parameter inside the method, not the variable passed to that parameter. It's no different to what happens with conventional parameter passing:

public static void GetTestClass(TestClass tc, string name) {
    ...
    tc = new TestClass();
    ...
}

static void Main() {
    TestClass tc = null;
    GetTestClass(tc, "Some Name");
    // The assignment to tc in GetTestClass doesn't affect the tc variable in Main.
    ...
}

As for a solution, avoid invoking extension methods on null references. It is obviously confusing. Just get the new object via simpler, more conventional idioms:

public static TestClass GetTestClass(string name) {
    ...
    TestClass tc = new TestClass();
    ...
    return tc;
}

static void Main() {
    TestClass tc = GetTestClass("Some Name");
    ...
}
share|improve this answer

I agree with @Stuart. It looks like you are hoping that the extension method will overwrite the current instance of the class with something retrieved by the database.

Either you need to remove the tc = new TestClass(); in the read loop or rewrite this extension class as a static factory method on TestClass or maybe a TestClassFactory.

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