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I encounter a problem using std::string in parameters :

MyClass has a method like this

public:  
    void loadDatas(string filename);

In my main.cpp I have the following simple code :

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

#include "myclass.hpp";

using namespace std;

int main()
{

    string foo = "test.txt";
    cout << foo << endl; // Print Hello Kitty, no problems

    MyClass i;
    // The following line raise :
    // obj/Release/src/main.o||In function `main':|
    // main.cpp|| undefined reference to `MyClass::loadDatas(std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >)'|
    // ||=== Build finished: 1 errors, 0 warnings ===|
    i.loadDatas(foo);

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;

}

So it looks like libstdc++ is well linked (because I'm able to print the text using cout), but passing a string in parameters raise an error and I don't understand why.

Could someone help me please ?

EDIT : I made a mistake, in fact it is i.loadDatas(foo); (I corrected it). My source code isn't in english so I tryed to made a simple version for you in english. I really call an instance method and not a static method.

EDIT 2 : Complete source code

personnage.hpp

#ifndef PERSONNAGE_H
#define PERSONNAGE_H

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

#include <libxml/tree.h>
#include <libxml/parser.h>
#include <libxml/xmlmemory.h>
#include <libxml/xpath.h>
#include <libxml/xpathInternals.h>

#include "carte.hpp"

using namespace std;

class Personnage : public Carte
{

    public:

        Personnage();

        void chargerPersonnage(string nom);

        virtual ~Personnage();

    private:

        //! Le texte d'accroche de la carte
        string _accroche;

};

#endif // PERSONNAGE_H

personnage.cpp

#include "personnage.hpp"

Personnage::Personnage() : Carte("Sans titre")
{

}

void chargerPersonnage(string nom)
{

}

Personnage::~Personnage()
{
    //dtor
}

main.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

#include <SFML/Graphics.hpp>

#include "personnage.hpp"

using namespace sf;
using namespace std;

int main()
{

    string test = "Hello Kitty";
    cout << test << endl;

    Personnage test2;
    test2.chargerPersonnage(test);

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

error log

obj/Release/src/main.o||In function `main':|
main.cpp|| undefined reference to `Personnage::chargerPersonnage(std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >)'|
||=== Build finished: 1 errors, 0 warnings ===|
share|improve this question
    
Without seeing myclass.hpp and myclass.cpp, it's difficult to say. Also, we'd need to see how you're invoking the compiler/linker. – Oliver Charlesworth Apr 2 '11 at 13:56
1  
@Oli Charlesworth : The function in myclass.cpp is empty (to avoid other possible errors), and myclass.hpp only declare The constructor, the destructor and this methode. Libraries included are : iostream and string (there is libxml/tree.h, but it is not used in the source code). And the compiler is invoked by Code::Blocks (it use g++ and link with -lxml2 only (I tryed using -llibstdc but I doesn't change anything)). – MARTIN Damien Apr 2 '11 at 14:19
    
Please add the code for both of these files to your question. It's very difficult to come to any conclusion without seeing the exact code that is causing the problem. – Oliver Charlesworth Apr 2 '11 at 14:22
    
@Oli Charlesworth I added the complete source code (it's only missing one class (Carte) but it don't do anything for the moment I could remove the inheritance if necessary). – MARTIN Damien Apr 2 '11 at 14:32
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is that you've defined class Personnage as having a member function chargerPersonnage, but in personnage.cpp you define a free function chargerPersonnage instead.

You appear to know the correct syntax, as you did Personnage's constructor and destructor correctly, but just to make it clear: Change void chargerPersonnage(string nom) { } to void Personnage::chargerPersonnage(string nom) { } in personnage.cpp.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much ! 5 years without programming in C++ has had a bad effect on me... I'm feeling so stupid... Thank you again ildjarn. – MARTIN Damien Apr 2 '11 at 15:05
MyClass i;
MyClass.loadDatas(foo); 
     //^this syntax is wrong. Dot is used with "instance" of class!

Wrong syntax. I think you wanted to write:

i.loadDatas(foo);

However, if loadData is a static member function, then you've to write it:

MyClass::loadDatas(foo);
     //^^ note the difference!

REPLY TO YOUR EDIT:

I don't think it's possible to point out the error in your code without seeing more code. Maybe, you've not defined the function loadDatas. Make sure you've defined it. Also, check out the spelling, syntax and all.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1: Good catch! – Oliver Charlesworth Apr 2 '11 at 13:59

Just a guess: if you do not use use namespace std; in your header file (which you shouldn't because it can be evil), you need to define your method with std::string filename.

share|improve this answer
    
+1; not the solution to this problem, but excellent advice in general. – ildjarn Apr 2 '11 at 15:03
    
Just a note: I posted my answer before the OP added his complete source. – dwo Apr 2 '11 at 16:53
    
Oh, I know, I saw the timestamps. I just wanted to call extra attention to your answer even though it wouldn't be the accepted answer. :-] – ildjarn Apr 2 '11 at 19:19

I see two problems in your code:

  • loadDatas lacks a return type
  • I think you mean i.loadDatas(foo); and not MyClass.loadDatas(foo);
share|improve this answer
    
Yes that's write and return type is void (see EDIT note). – MARTIN Damien Apr 2 '11 at 14:15

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