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I am using sed for the first time so it might not even be the right tool for the job but after extensive googling it seems to be what would do the job. My problem is that i have a data file from which I need to extract some data and discard the rest.

Sample data

    #Ranger (62:0)
Device pose: (0, 0, 0), (0, 0, 0)
Device size: (0, 0, 0)
Configuration: 
Minimum angle: 0    Maximum angle: 0    Angular resolution: 0
Minimum range: 0    Maximum range: 0Range resolution: 0
Scanning frequency: 0
682 range readings:
  [0.529, 0.524, 0.511, 0.506, 0.505, 0.505, 0.505, 0.505, 0.505, 0.503, 0.495, 0.483, 0.471, 0.469, 0.469, 0.469, 0.469, 0.465, 0.458, 0.458, 0.454, 0.454, 0.454, 0.45, 0.443, 0.442, 0.442, 0.443]
    #Ranger (62:0)
Device pose: (0, 0, 0), (0, 0, 0)
Device size: (0, 0, 0)
Configuration: 
Minimum angle: 0    Maximum angle: 0    Angular resolution: 0
Minimum range: 0    Maximum range: 0Range resolution: 0
Scanning frequency: 0
682 range readings:
  [0.529, 0.524, 0.511, 0.506, 0.505, 0.505, 0.505, 0.505, 0.505, 0.503, 0.495, 0.483, 0.471, 0.469, 0.469, 0.469, 0.469, 0.465, 0.458, 0.458, 0.454, 0.454, 0.454, 0.45, 0.443, 0.442, 0.442, 0.443]

This pattern is repeated quite a few number of times. The data that I want is between the [ and ]. I want all the data between all the [ ] pairs. I have tried a few sed scripts including one that was sent as a solution to a very similar problem but to no avail. The script

sed -n -e '/\[[^]]/s/^[^[]*\[\([^]]*\)].*$/\1/p' <a.txt >b.txt

produces an empty b.txt. Then I tried

sed -e '1s/#/<rem>\n&/g'  -e 's/\]/\n<rem>/g' -e 's/\[/<\/rem>\n/g' -e '/^$/d' -e 's/[ ]*//g' <a.txt > b.txt

Which produces nice delimited blocks of data that are surrounded by <rem> and </rem> tags like so

<rem>
#Ranger(62:0)
Devicepose:(0,0,0),(0,0,0)
Devicesize:(0,0,0)
Configuration:
Minimumangle:0  Maximumangle:0  Angularresolution:0
Minimumrange:0  Maximumrange:0Rangeresolution:0
Scanningfrequency:0
682rangereadings:
</rem>
0.529,0.524,0.511,0.506,0.505,0.505,0.505,0.505,0.505,0.503,0.495,0.483,0.471,0.469,0.469,0.469,0.469,0.465,0.458,0.458,0.454,0.454,0.454,0.45,0.443,0.442,0.442,0.443,0.451,0.459,0.459
<rem>
#Ranger(62:0)
Devicepose:(0,0,0),(0,0,0)
Devicesize:(0,0,0)

After this when I try

sed -e '/<rem>/,/<\/rem>/d' <b.txt >c.txt

I get

#Ranger(62:0)
Devicepose:(0,0,0),(0,0,0)
Devicesize:(0,0,0)
Configuration:
Minimumangle:0  Maximumangle:0  Angularresolution:0
Minimumrange:0  Maximumrange:0Rangeresolution:0
Scanningfrequency:0
682rangereadings:
#Ranger(62:0)
Devicepose:(0,0,0),(0,0,0)
Devicesize:(0,0,0)

Exactly the opposite of what I am trying to achieve. Can someone please help? Sorry for the long explanation.

share|improve this question
    
try surounding the < and > chars with [], ie [<]. I'm surprised your solution doesn't work too. –  shellter Apr 2 '11 at 14:40
    
Thanks. I did what you suggested but still no luck. Its really puzzling all the online tutorials suggest that it should work. –  Rizwan Apr 2 '11 at 18:31
1  
I had time to check this. After I copied you b.txt file and extended it so I had to rem,/rem pairs, it did work, I got 2 lines of CSV data output, as we had expected. I have seen various versions of sed have problems with processing /pat1/,/pat2/ ranges. You could also try the inverse sed command (only print lines not in the range). . sed -n '/pat1/,/pat2/!p' b.txt >c.txt. (This worked in my sed as well). Also the grep solutions provided by others seem to meet your specification, with a lot less hassle. Finally, what OS and version of SED (AIX?, ha! no wonder). Good luck! –  shellter Apr 2 '11 at 18:54
    
I am new to the *NIX environment having just recently installed Ubuntu 10.10. It has GNU sed version 4.2.1. I tried the inverse sed command and still no luck but thanks for the help and sorry for all the trouble :) –  Rizwan Apr 3 '11 at 7:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Maybe this is what you want:

sed -nr 's/\s*\[([^\]+)\]/\1/p'
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. It did the job quite nicely and was exactly what I wanted. –  Rizwan Apr 2 '11 at 18:29

This can be done easily with grep:

user@machine:~/tmp$ grep '\[' data
  [0.529, 0.524, 0.511, 0.506, 0.505, 0.505, 0.505, 0.505, 0.505, 0.503, 0.495, 0.483, 0.471, 0.469, 0.469, 0.469, 0.469, 0.465, 0.458, 0.458, 0.454, 0.454, 0.454, 0.45, 0.443, 0.442, 0.442, 0.443]
  [0.529, 0.524, 0.511, 0.506, 0.505, 0.505, 0.505, 0.505, 0.505, 0.503, 0.495, 0.483, 0.471, 0.469, 0.469, 0.469, 0.469, 0.465, 0.458, 0.458, 0.454, 0.454, 0.454, 0.45, 0.443, 0.442, 0.442, 0.443]

If you want to store the output in a new file, just redirect:

user@machine:~/tmp$ grep '\[' data > extracted_values.dat
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for the answer, it did the job. Now I feel really stupid seeing the answer is about three characters long :) –  Rizwan Apr 2 '11 at 18:27

According to your data, it seems you only need to get those in [] and no other lines contain []. Here are some other ways

$ awk '/\[/{ gsub(/\[|\]/,"");print}' file

its says search for [ and print the line, at the same time removing the brackets (if you need the brackets , remove the gsub statement

$ ruby -ne 'print if /\[/' file 

or

$ ruby -ne 'puts $_.scan(/\[(.*?)\]/) if /\[/' file #no brackets
0.529, 0.524, 0.511, 0.506, 0.505, 0.505, 0.505, 0.505, 0.505, 0.503, 0.495, 0.483, 0.471, 0.469, 0.469, 0.469, 0.469, 0.465, 0.458, 0.458, 0.454, 0.454, 0.454, 0.45, 0.443, 0.442, 0.442, 0.443
0.529, 0.524, 0.511, 0.506, 0.505, 0.505, 0.505, 0.505, 0.505, 0.503, 0.495, 0.483, 0.471, 0.469, 0.469, 0.469, 0.469, 0.465, 0.458, 0.458, 0.454, 0.454, 0.454, 0.45, 0.443, 0.442, 0.442, 0.443

with grep

$ grep "\[" file

if you insist on sed

$ sed -n '/\[/p' file
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answers, they were pretty much what I wanted. I just recently installed Ubuntu 10.10 so am pretty new to the *NIX environment. I did not try the ruby commands but the others were what I was looking for. –  Rizwan Apr 2 '11 at 18:26

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